Nonconformist

non-conformistNonconformistsNonconformismNonconformitynon-conformistsnon-conformitynon-conformismDissentersdissentingFree Church
In English church history, a Nonconformist was a Protestant who did not "conform" to the governance and usages of the established Church of England.wikipedia
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Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
Broad use of the term was precipitated after the Restoration of the British monarchy in 1660, when the Act of Uniformity 1662 re-established the opponents of reform within the Church of England.
The later phases saw the Penal Laws punish Roman Catholic and nonconforming Protestants.

Congregational church

CongregationalCongregationalistCongregationalists
By the late 19th century the term specifically included the Reformed Christians (Presbyterians, Congregationalists and other Calvinist sects), plus the Baptists and Methodists.
The report defines it very narrowly, encompassing mainly denominations in the United States and the United Kingdom, which can trace their history back to nonconforming Protestants, Puritans, Separatists, Independents, English religious groups coming out of the English Civil War, and other English dissenters not satisfied with the degree to which the Church of England had been reformed.

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsProtestant church
In English church history, a Nonconformist was a Protestant who did not "conform" to the governance and usages of the established Church of England.
The later Puritan movement, often referred to as dissenters and nonconformists, eventually led to the formation of various Reformed denominations.

Matthew Henry

HenryHenry, Matthewhis son Matthew
One influential Nonconformist minister was Matthew Henry, who beginning in 1710 published his multi-volume Commentary that is still used and available in the 21st century.
Matthew Henry (18 October 1662 – 22 June 1714) was a nonconformist minister and author, born in Wales but spending much of his life in England.

English Dissenters

DissentersDissentingDissenter
The English Dissenters such as the Puritans who violated the Act of Uniformity 1559—typically by practising radical, sometimes separatist, dissent—were retrospectively labelled as Nonconformists.
These ministers and their followers came to be known as Nonconformists, though originally this term referred to refusal to use certain vestments and ceremonies of the Church of England, rather than separation from it.

Isaac Watts

Dr Isaac WattsWattsDr. Watts’
Isaac Watts is an equally recognized Nonconformist minister whose hymns are still sung by Christians worldwide.
Watts was born in Southampton, England in 1674 and was brought up in the home of a committed religious nonconformist; his father, also Isaac Watts, had been incarcerated twice for his views.

Methodism

MethodistMethodist ChurchMethodists
By the late 19th century the term specifically included the Reformed Christians (Presbyterians, Congregationalists and other Calvinist sects), plus the Baptists and Methodists. Following the act, other groups, including Methodists, Unitarians, Quakers, Plymouth Brethren, and the English Moravians were officially labelled as Nonconformists as they became organized.
This twofold practice became distinctive of Methodism because worship in the Church of England was based, by law, solely on the Book of Common Prayer and worship in the Non-conformist churches was almost exclusively that of "services of the word", i.e. preaching services, with Holy Communion being observed infrequently.

Act of Uniformity 1662

Act of UniformityUniformity Act of 1662Uniformity Act 1662
Broad use of the term was precipitated after the Restoration of the British monarchy in 1660, when the Act of Uniformity 1662 re-established the opponents of reform within the Church of England. The Act of Uniformity of 1662 required churchmen to use all rites and ceremonies as prescribed in the Book of Common Prayer.
Although there had already been ministers outside the established church, this created the concept of non-conformity, with a substantial section of English society excluded from public affairs for a century and a half.

Puritans

PuritanPuritanismpuritanical
The English Dissenters such as the Puritans who violated the Act of Uniformity 1559—typically by practising radical, sometimes separatist, dissent—were retrospectively labelled as Nonconformists. It also required episcopal ordination of all ministers of the Church of England—a pronouncement most odious to the Puritans, the faction of the church which had come to dominance during the English Civil War and the Interregnum.
Many continued to practice their faith in nonconformist denominations, especially in Congregationalist and Presbyterian churches.

Penal law (British)

Penal LawsClarendon CodePenal Law
The strict religious tests embodied in the laws of the Clarendon Code and other penal laws excluded a substantial section of English society from public affairs and benefits, including certification of university degrees, for well more than a century and a half.
In English history, penal law refers to a specific series of laws that sought to uphold the establishment of the Church of England against Protestant nonconformists and Catholicism, by imposing various forfeitures, civil penalties, and civil disabilities upon these dissenters.

Quakers

QuakerSociety of FriendsReligious Society of Friends
Following the act, other groups, including Methodists, Unitarians, Quakers, Plymouth Brethren, and the English Moravians were officially labelled as Nonconformists as they became organized.
A young man, George Fox, was dissatisfied with the teachings of the Church of England and nonconformists.

Toleration Act 1688

Toleration ActAct of Toleration 1689Act of Toleration
The term dissenter later came into particular use after the Act of Toleration (1689), which exempted those Nonconformists who had taken oaths of allegiance from being penalized for certain acts, such as for non-attendance to Church of England services.
The Act allowed freedom of worship to nonconformists who had pledged to the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy and rejected transubstantiation, i.e., Protestants who dissented from the Church of England such as Baptists, Congregationalists or English Presbyterians, but not to Roman Catholics.

English Civil War

Civil WarCivil WarsEnglish Revolution
It also required episcopal ordination of all ministers of the Church of England—a pronouncement most odious to the Puritans, the faction of the church which had come to dominance during the English Civil War and the Interregnum.
The views of the members of Parliament ranged from unquestioning support of the King — at one point during the First Civil War, more members of the Commons and Lords gathered in the King's Oxford Parliament than at Westminster — through to radicals who sought major reforms in religious independence and redistribution of power at a national level.

Test Act

Test ActsTestTest and Corporation Acts
The Test Act of 1673 made it illegal for anyone not receiving communion in the Church of England to hold office under the crown.
The Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that served as a religious test for public office and imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics and nonconformists.

Book of Common Prayer

Prayer BookThe Book of Common Prayer1662 Book of Common Prayer
The Act of Uniformity of 1662 required churchmen to use all rites and ceremonies as prescribed in the Book of Common Prayer.
In effect, the 1662 Prayer Book marked the end of a period of just over 100 years, when a common form of liturgy served for almost all reformed public worship in England and the start of the continuing division between Anglicans and Nonconformists.

Calvinism

CalvinistReformedCalvinists
By the late 19th century the term specifically included the Reformed Christians (Presbyterians, Congregationalists and other Calvinist sects), plus the Baptists and Methodists.
Nonconforming Protestants, Puritans, Separatists, Independents, English religious groups coming out of the English Civil War, and other English dissenters not satisfied with the degree to which the Church of England had been reformed, held overwhelmingly Reformed views.

Whigs (British political party)

WhigWhigsWhig Party
The Nonconformist cause was linked closely to the Whigs, who advocated civil and religious liberty.
The Whig Party slowly evolved during the 18th century; its "tendency" supported the great aristocratic families, generally the continued disenfranchisement of Catholics and toleration of nonconformist Protestants (the dissenters, such as Presbyterians), while Tories favoured the relative smallholders (whether narrowly) or minor gentry with "High Tories" preferring high church elements or even the exiled Stuarts' claim to the throne (Jacobitism) and virtually all maintained the legitimacy of a strongly established Church of England.

Nonconformist conscience

nonconformist
The nonconformist conscience, as it was called, was repeatedly called upon by Gladstone for support for his moralistic foreign policy.
The Nonconformist conscience was the moralistic influence of the Nonconformist churches in British politics in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Act of Uniformity 1558

Act of UniformityAct of Uniformity 1559Uniformity
The English Dissenters such as the Puritans who violated the Act of Uniformity 1559—typically by practising radical, sometimes separatist, dissent—were retrospectively labelled as Nonconformists.

John Clifford (minister)

John Clifford
John Clifford formed the National Passive Resistance Committee.
John Clifford CH (16 October 1836 in Sawley, Derbyshire – 20 November 1923 in London) was a British Nonconformist minister and politician, who became famous as the advocate of passive resistance to the Education Act of 1902

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
After the Test and Corporation Acts were repealed in 1828, all the Nonconformists elected to Parliament were Liberals.
They favoured social reform, personal liberty, reducing the powers of the Crown and the Church of England (many Liberals were Nonconformists), avoidance of war and foreign alliances (which were bad for business) and above all free trade.

Great Ejection

ejected ministerejectedejected ministers
Consequently, nearly 2,000 clergymen were "ejected" from the established church for refusing to comply with the provisions of the act, an event referred to as the Great Ejection.
Although there had already been ministers outside the established church, the Great Ejection created an abiding concept of non-conformity.

Education Act 1902

1902 Education ActEducation Act of 1902Education Bill
Nonconformists were angered by the Education Act 1902, which provided for the support of denominational schools from taxes.
It was brought to Parliament by a Conservative government and was supported by the Church of England, opposed many by Nonconformists and the Liberal Party.

Dissenter

Dissentersdissentingdissenting minister
The term dissenter later came into particular use after the Act of Toleration (1689), which exempted those Nonconformists who had taken oaths of allegiance from being penalized for certain acts, such as for non-attendance to Church of England services.
In this connotation, the terms "dissenter" and "dissenting", which had acquired a somewhat contemptuous flavor, have tended since the middle of the 18th century to be replaced by "nonconformist", a term which did not originally imply secession, but only refusal to conform in certain particulars (for example the wearing of the surplice), with the authorized usages of the Established Church.

Church in Wales

Province of WalesAnglicanWales
The influence of Nonconformism in the early part of the 20th century, boosted by the 1904–1905 Welsh Revival, led to the disestablishment of the Anglican Church in Wales in 1920 and the formation of the Church in Wales.
During the 19th century, Nonconformist churches grew rapidly in Wales, and eventually the majority of Welsh Christians were Nonconformists, although the Church of England remained the largest single denomination.