Nordic countries

NordicNordic regionNordic countryNordicsNorseNordic statesScandinaviaScandinavian countriesthe Nordic countriesMinister for Nordic Cooperation
The Nordic countries, or the Nordics, are a geographical and cultural region in Northern Europe and the North Atlantic, where they are most commonly known as Norden (literally "the North").wikipedia
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Denmark

DanishKingdom of DenmarkConstituent country
The term includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, as well as Greenland and the Faroe Islands—which are both part of the Kingdom of Denmark—and the Åland Islands and Svalbard archipelagos that belong to Finland and Norway respectively, whereas the Norwegian Antarctic territories are often not considered a part of the Nordic countries, due to their geographical location.
Denmark (Danmark, ), officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a Nordic country.

Finland

FinnishFINRepublic of Finland
The term includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, as well as Greenland and the Faroe Islands—which are both part of the Kingdom of Denmark—and the Åland Islands and Svalbard archipelagos that belong to Finland and Norway respectively, whereas the Norwegian Antarctic territories are often not considered a part of the Nordic countries, due to their geographical location.
Finland (Suomi ; Finland, ), officially the Republic of Finland (Suomen tasavalta, Republiken Finland ), is a Nordic country in Northern Europe bordering the Baltic Sea, Gulf of Bothnia, and Gulf of Finland, between Norway to the north, Sweden to the northwest, and Russia to the east.

Iceland

IcelandicISLRepublic of Iceland
The term includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, as well as Greenland and the Faroe Islands—which are both part of the Kingdom of Denmark—and the Åland Islands and Svalbard archipelagos that belong to Finland and Norway respectively, whereas the Norwegian Antarctic territories are often not considered a part of the Nordic countries, due to their geographical location.
Iceland (Ísland; ) is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 360,390 and an area of 103000 km2, making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe.

Norway

NorwegianKingdom of NorwayNOR
The term includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, as well as Greenland and the Faroe Islands—which are both part of the Kingdom of Denmark—and the Åland Islands and Svalbard archipelagos that belong to Finland and Norway respectively, whereas the Norwegian Antarctic territories are often not considered a part of the Nordic countries, due to their geographical location.
Norway (Norwegian: (Bokmål) or (Nynorsk); Norga; ; ), officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northwestern Europe whose territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula; the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard are also part of the Kingdom of Norway.

North Germanic peoples

North GermanicScandinaviansNorse
Scandinavians, who comprise over three quarters of the region's population, are the largest group, followed by Finns, who comprise the majority in Finland; other ethnic groups are the Greenlandic Inuit, the Sami people, and recent immigrants and their descendants.
North Germanic peoples, commonly called Scandinavians, Nordic peoples and in a medieval context Norsemen, are a Germanic ethnolinguistic group of the Nordic countries.

Nordic Council

Nordic Council of MinistersPresident of the Nordic CouncilNC
Politically, Nordic countries do not form a separate entity, but they co-operate in the Nordic Council and the Nordic Council of Ministers.
The Nordic Council is the official body for formal inter-parliamentary co-operation among the Nordic countries.

Nordic model

Swedish modelNordic welfare modelNordic social welfare system
Each of the Nordic countries has its own economic and social models, sometimes with large differences from its neighbours, but to varying degrees the Nordic countries share the Nordic model of economy and social structure: a market economy is combined with strong labour unions and a universalist welfare sector financed by heavy taxes.
The Nordic model comprises the economic and social policies, as well as typical cultural practices, common to the Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway, and Sweden).

Scandinavia

Scandinavian countriesScandinavianNordic
It is meant usually to refer to this larger group, since the term Scandinavia is narrower and sometimes ambiguous.
In English usage, Scandinavia also sometimes refers to the Scandinavian Peninsula, or to the broader region including Finland and Iceland, which is always known locally as the Nordic countries.

Welfare state

welfarewelfare statessocial state
Each of the Nordic countries has its own economic and social models, sometimes with large differences from its neighbours, but to varying degrees the Nordic countries share the Nordic model of economy and social structure: a market economy is combined with strong labour unions and a universalist welfare sector financed by heavy taxes.
Modern welfare states include Germany, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, as well as the Nordic countries, which employ a system known as the Nordic model.

Norwegian language

NorwegianNeutralNorwegian:
The native languages Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese are all North Germanic languages rooted in Old Norse.
Under the Nordic Language Convention, citizens of the Nordic countries who speak Norwegian have the opportunity to use their native language when interacting with official bodies in other Nordic countries without being liable to any interpretation or translation costs.

North Germanic languages

ScandinavianScandinavian languagesNorth Germanic
The native languages Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese are all North Germanic languages rooted in Old Norse.
Approximately 20 million people in the Nordic countries speak a Scandinavian language as their native language, including an approximately 5% minority in Finland.

Stockholm

Stockholm, SwedenStockholm Citycity of Stockholm
Helsinki, Oslo and Stockholm are all close to the same latitude as the southernmost point of Greenland, Egger Island (Itilleq): about 60°N.
Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and the most populous urban area in the Nordic countries; 972,647 people live in the municipality, approximately 1.6 million in the urban area, and 2.4 million in the metropolitan area.

Copenhagen

Copenhagen, DenmarkKøbenhavnKopenhagen
During the renaissance the city served as the de facto capital being the seat of government of the Kalmar Union, governing the entire present day Nordic region in a personal union with Sweden and Norway ruled by the Danish monarch serving as the head of state.

Foreningen Norden

Foreningene Nordens ForbundHenry George fora ingenNordic Society
Foreningen Norden (Norwegian and Danish), Föreningen Norden (Swedish), Norræna félagið (Icelandic), Norrøna Felagið (Faroese), Peqatigiiffik Nunat Avannarliit (Greenlandic) and Pohjola-Norden (Finnish), The Norden Associations, sometimes referred to as The Nordic Associations are non-governmental organisations in the Nordic countries promoting civil cooperation between the Nordic countries.

Tampere

Tampere, FinlandTammerforsCity of Tampere
It is the most populous inland city in the Nordic countries.

Aarhus

ÅrhusAarhus, DenmarkArhus
It is a centre for research and education in the Nordic countries and home to Aarhus University, Scandinavia's largest university, including Aarhus University Hospital and INCUBA Science Park.

Sweden

SwedishSWEKingdom of Sweden
The term includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, as well as Greenland and the Faroe Islands—which are both part of the Kingdom of Denmark—and the Åland Islands and Svalbard archipelagos that belong to Finland and Norway respectively, whereas the Norwegian Antarctic territories are often not considered a part of the Nordic countries, due to their geographical location.
During the last year of the war, Sweden began to play a role in humanitarian efforts, and many refugees, among them several thousand Jews from Nazi-occupied Europe, were rescued thanks to the Swedish rescue missions to internment camps and partly because Sweden served as a haven for refugees, primarily from the Nordic countries and the Baltic states.

Gothenburg

Gothenburg, SwedenGöteborgGöteborg, Sweden
Gothenburg (abbreviated Gbg; Göteborg ) is the second-largest city in Sweden, fifth-largest in the Nordic countries, and capital of the Västra Götaland County.

Stavanger

Stavanger, NorwayStavengerStavanger, Rogaland
Norwegian energy company Equinor, the largest company in the Nordic region, is headquartered in Stavanger.

Finnish language

FinnishFinnish-languagefi
Native non-Germanic languages are Finnish, Greenlandic and several Sami languages.
Under the Nordic Language Convention, citizens of the Nordic countries speaking Finnish have the opportunity to use their native language when interacting with official bodies in other Nordic countries without being liable to any interpretation or translation costs.

Flag

flagpoleflagsflagstaff
The oldest flag of the Nordic countries is the flag of Denmark with a description dating from 1748.

Mandatory Swedish

compulsory school subjectscompulsory subjectsmandatory subjects
For example, Swedish is a mandatory subject in Finnish schools, since Finland by law is a bilingual country.
Supporters of Mandatory Swedish argue that it brings Finland closer to the Nordic countries, since Swedish is part of the larger Scandinavian dialect continuum and, at least for proficient speakers, mutually intelligible with both Danish and Norwegian, while Finnish belongs to the unrelated Finnic language group.

Scania

SkåneSkane(Skåne)
The nearby Copenhagen Airport, which is the largest international airport in the Nordic countries, also serves the province.

Swedish language

SwedishSwedish-languageSwedish-speaking
The native languages Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese are all North Germanic languages rooted in Old Norse.
There is considerable migration between the Nordic countries, but owing to the similarity between the cultures and languages (with the exception of Finnish), expatriates generally assimilate quickly and do not stand out as a group.

Icelandic króna

ISKkrónurkróna
Like the Nordic currencies (such as the Danish krone, Swedish krona and Norwegian krone) that participated in the historical Scandinavian Monetary Union, the name króna (meaning crown) comes from the Latin word corona ("crown").