Norridgewock

KennebecCaniba
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.wikipedia
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Acadia

Acadiel'AcadieHistory of Acadia
During colonial times, this area was territory disputed between British and French colonists, and was set along the claimed western border of Acadia, the western bank of the Kennebec River.
During much of the 17th and early 18th centuries, Norridgewock on the Kennebec River and Castine at the end of the Penobscot River were the southernmost settlements of Acadia.

Madison, Maine

MadisonEast Madison, Maine
The last one, where the French Jesuit priest Sebastian Rale had a mission, is today called Old Point, and is located in Madison.
Madison (formerly Norridgewock) is a town in Somerset County, Maine, United States.

Abenaki

Abenaki peopleAbenakisAbnaki
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.
The Massachusetts government then declared war and bloody battles were fought at Norridgewock (1724), where Rasles was killed, and at a daylong battle at the Indian village near present-day Fryeburg, Maine, on the upper Saco River (1725).

Maine

MEState of MaineMaine, United States
The tribe occupied an area in the interior of Maine.
The other Abenaki tribes suffered several severe defeats, particularly during Dummer's War, with the capture of Norridgewock in 1724 and the defeat of the Pequawket in 1725, which greatly reduced their numbers.

Norridgewock, Maine

NorridgewockNorridgewock FallsNorridgewock, ME
Other sites are located nearby in Starks and the present-day town of Norridgewock.
Situated on the New England and Acadia border, which New France defined as the Kennebec River, the area was once territory of the Norridgewock Indians, a band of the Abenaki nation.

Kennebec River

KennebecAtkins BayKennebec River Valley
During colonial times, this area was territory disputed between British and French colonists, and was set along the claimed western border of Acadia, the western bank of the Kennebec River.
In 1605, Samuel de Champlain navigated the coast of what is now Maine, charting the land and rivers of what was then called New France, L'Acadie including the Kennebec as far up as Bath, as well as the St. Croix, and Penobscot rivers The Abenaki village of Norridgewock was located on the Kennebec in the 1600s.

New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
The French of New France called the village Kennebec.
To secure New France's claim to the region, it established Catholic missions among the three largest indigenous villages in the region: one on the Kennebec River (Norridgewock); one further north on the Penobscot River (Penobscot) and one on the Saint John River (Medoctec).

King William's War

1688Indian warsSecond Indian War
During King William's War, on July 18, 1694, French soldier Claude-Sébastien de Villieu with about 250 Abenakis from Norridgewock under command of their sagamore (paramount chief), Bomazeen (or Bomoseen) raided the English settlement of Durham, New Hampshire, in the "Oyster River Massacre".
To secure New France's claim to present-day Maine, New France established Catholic missions among the three largest native villages in the region: one on the Kennebec River (Norridgewock); one further north on the Penobscot River (Penobscot) and one on the Saint John River (Medoctec).

Durham, New Hampshire

DurhamDurham, NH Durham
During King William's War, on July 18, 1694, French soldier Claude-Sébastien de Villieu with about 250 Abenakis from Norridgewock under command of their sagamore (paramount chief), Bomazeen (or Bomoseen) raided the English settlement of Durham, New Hampshire, in the "Oyster River Massacre".
During King William's War, on July 18, 1694, the English settlement was attacked in the Raid on Oyster River by French career soldier Claude-Sébastien de Villieu with about 250 Abenaki from Norridgewock under command of their sagamore Bomazeen (or Bomoseen).

Northeast Coast Campaign (1703)

1703Northeast Coast Campaignmilitary campaign against the New England frontier
On the contrary, however, the Norridgewock tribe in August joined a larger force of French and Indians, commanded by Alexandre Leneuf de Beaubassin, to attack Wells in the Northeast Coast Campaign.
Alexandre Leneuf de La Vallière de Beaubassin led 500 troops made up of French colonial forces and the Wabanaki Confederacy of Acadia (200 Mi'kmaq and others from Norridgewock).

Queen Anne's War

at this timeEuropean conflictsexpedition against Canada
When Queen Anne's War broke out, with New France and New England again fighting over the border between New England and Acadia, Massachusetts Governor Joseph Dudley arranged a conference with tribal representatives in 1703 to propose that they remain neutral.
There were Catholic missions at Norridgewock and Penobscot and a French settlement in Penobscot Bay near Castine, Maine, which had all been bases for attacks on New England settlers migrating toward Acadia during King William's War.

Dummer's War

Father Rale's War1724against Canada
During Father Rale's War, at about 3:00 pm on August 23, 1724 (N. S.), English troops attacked Norridgewock for the last time.
New France established Catholic missions among the four largest Indian villages in the region: one on the Kennebec River (Norridgewock), one farther north on the Penobscot River (Penobscot Indian Island Reservation), one on the Saint John River (Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic), and one at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia (Saint Anne's Mission).

Brunswick, Maine

BrunswickBrunswick, MEScituate
The tribe retaliated for the invasion by attacking settlements below them on the Kennebec, burning Brunswick on June 13, 1722.
But during Dummer's War on July 13, 1722, Abenaki warriors from Norridgewock burned the village.

Raid on Oyster River

Oyster River Massacreattackattack against Pescadouet (Oyster Bay)
During King William's War, on July 18, 1694, French soldier Claude-Sébastien de Villieu with about 250 Abenakis from Norridgewock under command of their sagamore (paramount chief), Bomazeen (or Bomoseen) raided the English settlement of Durham, New Hampshire, in the "Oyster River Massacre".
The English settlement of Oyster River was attacked by Villieu with about 250 Abenaki Indians, composed of two main groups from the Penobscot and Norridgewock under command of their sagamore Bomazeen (or Bomoseen).

Richmond, Maine

RichmondFort RichmondRichmond Corner
A force of 208 soldiers had left Fort Richmond (now Richmond) and divided, leaving about 80 soldiers including three Mohawks under the command of Captain Jeremiah Moulton.
During Dummer's War, following the battle at Arrowsic, Maine, Fort Richmond was attacked in a three-hour siege by warriors from Norridgewock (1722).

Bécancour, Quebec

BécancourBecancour, QuebecBecancour
Subsequently, most abandoned the area and, "in deplorable condition", relocated to Saint-François and Bécancour in Quebec.
They arrived from Norridgewock, Maine (formerly Acadia) in the aftermath of Father Rale's War.

Treaty of Portsmouth (1713)

Treaty of Portsmouth1713 Treaty of Portsmouth
With the Treaty of Utrecht and Treaty of Portsmouth (1713), however, peace was restored between France and England.
On July 11, 1713, Governor Dudley and various dignitaries from New Hampshire and Massachusetts Bay (which then included Maine) met with delegates from Abenaki tribes, including the Amasacontee, Maliseet, Norridgewock, Pennacook, Penobscot and Sokoki.

Winthrop Hilton

Finding the village deserted in the winter of 1705 because its occupants, including Rale had been warned of an impending attack, Colonel Winthrop Hilton ordered his 275 British soldiers to burn the village and the church.
Finding the village of Norridgewock deserted in the winter of 1705 because its occupants, including Rale, had been warned of an impending attack, Colonel Hilton ordered his 275 British soldiers to burn the village and the church.

Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec

Saint-François-du-LacSt. FrancisSaint-Francis, Quebec
Subsequently, most abandoned the area and, "in deplorable condition", relocated to Saint-François and Bécancour in Quebec.
In the summer of 1723, the Norridgewock and 250 Indian allies from St. Francis conducted a second attack against Arrowsic.

Samuel Shute

Colonel Shute
On July 28, 1721, 250 Abenakis in 90 canoes delivered a letter at Georgetown addressed to Governor Samuel Shute, demanding that English settlers quit Abenaki lands.
The force reached the Kennebec village at Norridgewock where Rale was based, but the priest escaped.

Band society

hordeshordeband
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.

Algonquian peoples

AlgonquianAlgonquinAlgonquians
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.

Tribe

tribaltribestribals
Norridgewock was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki ("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States and Canada.