North-West Rebellion

Northwest RebellionRiel RebellionNorth West RebellionSecond Riel Rebellion1885North-West ResistanceSaskatchewan RebellionNorth West ResistanceNorth West Canada 1885North-West
The North-West Rebellion of 1885 was a rebellion by the Métis people under Louis Riel and an associated uprising by First Nations Cree and Assiniboine of the District of Saskatchewan against the government of Canada.wikipedia
480 Related Articles

Louis Riel

RielexecutionRiel Rebellions
The North-West Rebellion of 1885 was a rebellion by the Métis people under Louis Riel and an associated uprising by First Nations Cree and Assiniboine of the District of Saskatchewan against the government of Canada.
Instead he organized a military resistance that escalated into a military confrontation, the North-West Rebellion of 1885.

Battle of Batoche

BatocheBatoche National Historic SiteSaskatchewan
Despite some notable early victories at Duck Lake, Fish Creek and Cut Knife, the rebellion ended when the Métis were defeated at the Siege of Batoche.
The Battle of Batoche was the decisive battle of the North-West Rebellion, which pitted the Canadian authorities against a force of Cree, Sioux, and Métis people.

District of Saskatchewan

SaskatchewanSaskatchewan DistrictProvisional District of Saskatchewan
The North-West Rebellion of 1885 was a rebellion by the Métis people under Louis Riel and an associated uprising by First Nations Cree and Assiniboine of the District of Saskatchewan against the government of Canada.
The conflicts during the North-West Rebellion of 1885 occurred in the District of Saskatchewan.

Battle of Fish Creek

Fish CreekBattle of Tourond's Coulee / Fish CreekBattle of Tourond's Coulee/Fish Creek
Despite some notable early victories at Duck Lake, Fish Creek and Cut Knife, the rebellion ended when the Métis were defeated at the Siege of Batoche.
The Battle of Fish Creek (also known as the Battle of Tourond's Coulée ), fought April 24, 1885 at Fish Creek, Saskatchewan, was a major Métis victory over the Canadian forces attempting to quell Louis Riel's North-West Rebellion.

Batoche, Saskatchewan

BatocheBatoche National Historic SiteBatoche, District of Saskatchewan
After the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870, many of the Métis moved from Manitoba to the Fort Carlton region of the Northwest Territories, where they founded the Southbranch settlements of Fish Creek, Batoche, St. Laurent, St. Louis, and Duck Lake on or near the South Saskatchewan River.
Batoche, Saskatchewan was the site of the historic Battle of Batoche during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885.

Battle of Duck Lake

Duck Lakeresulting fight
Despite some notable early victories at Duck Lake, Fish Creek and Cut Knife, the rebellion ended when the Métis were defeated at the Siege of Batoche. On March 26, 1885, the 150 to 200 Métis and Aboriginal warriors under the command of Gabriel Dumont defeated a combined group of 90 Prince Albert Volunteers and North-West Mounted Police led by their superintendent Leif Newry Fitzroy Crozier at Battle of Duck Lake, outside Batoche.
The battle is considered the initial engagement of the North-West Rebellion.

Canadian Pacific Railway

Canadian PacificCPRCP Rail
Due to the key role that the Canadian Pacific Railway played in transporting troops, Conservative political support for it increased and Parliament authorized funds to complete the country's first transcontinental railway.
In March 1885, the North-West Rebellion broke out in the District of Saskatchewan.

Gabriel Dumont (Métis leader)

Gabriel DumontDumont, Gabriel
In March 1885, Riel, Gabriel Dumont, Honoré Jackson (a.k.a. Will Jackson), and others set up the Provisional Government of Saskatchewan, believing that they could influence the federal government in the same way as they had in 1869. On March 26, 1885, the 150 to 200 Métis and Aboriginal warriors under the command of Gabriel Dumont defeated a combined group of 90 Prince Albert Volunteers and North-West Mounted Police led by their superintendent Leif Newry Fitzroy Crozier at Battle of Duck Lake, outside Batoche.
Dumont was well known for his movements within the North-West Rebellion at the battles of Batoche, Fish Creek, and Duck Lake as well as for his role in the signing of treaties with the Blackfoot tribe, the traditional main enemy of the Métis.

Southbranch Settlement

Southbranch settlementsSouth BranchSt-Laurent-Grandin Métis settlements
After the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870, many of the Métis moved from Manitoba to the Fort Carlton region of the Northwest Territories, where they founded the Southbranch settlements of Fish Creek, Batoche, St. Laurent, St. Louis, and Duck Lake on or near the South Saskatchewan River.
The settlements became the centre of Métis resistance during the North-West Rebellion when in March 1885, Louis Riel, Gabriel Dumont, Honoré Jackson, and others set up the Provisional Government of Saskatchewan with their headquarters at Batoche.

Provisional Government of Saskatchewan

provisional governmentMétis militiaMétis provisional government
In March 1885, Riel, Gabriel Dumont, Honoré Jackson (a.k.a. Will Jackson), and others set up the Provisional Government of Saskatchewan, believing that they could influence the federal government in the same way as they had in 1869.
The Provisional Government of Saskatchewan was an independent state declared during the North-West Rebellion of 1885 in the District of Saskatchewan of the Northwest Territories.

Honoré Jackson

Honoré JaxonHonore JaxonHonore Jaxon (née Henry Jackson)
In March 1885, Riel, Gabriel Dumont, Honoré Jackson (a.k.a. Will Jackson), and others set up the Provisional Government of Saskatchewan, believing that they could influence the federal government in the same way as they had in 1869.
William Henry Jackson (May 3, 1861 – January 10, 1952), also known as Honoré Jackson or Jaxon, was secretary to Louis Riel during the North-West Rebellion in Canada in 1885.

Looting of Battleford

BattleforddamagedSiege of Battleford
In both the Frog Lake Massacre and the Siege of Fort Battleford, small dissident groups of Cree men revolted against the authority of Big Bear and Poundmaker.
The Looting of Battleford began at the end of March, 1885, during the North-West Rebellion, in the town of Battleford, Saskatchewan, then a part of the Northwest Territories.

Frog Lake Massacre

Frog LakeattackFrog Lake, Saskatchewan
In both the Frog Lake Massacre and the Siege of Fort Battleford, small dissident groups of Cree men revolted against the authority of Big Bear and Poundmaker.
The Frog Lake Massacre was part of the Cree uprising during the North-West Rebellion in western Canada.

North-West Mounted Police

Royal Northwest Mounted PoliceNorth West Mounted PoliceNorthwest Mounted Police
In addition, the North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) had been created, developing an armed local force. On March 26, 1885, the 150 to 200 Métis and Aboriginal warriors under the command of Gabriel Dumont defeated a combined group of 90 Prince Albert Volunteers and North-West Mounted Police led by their superintendent Leif Newry Fitzroy Crozier at Battle of Duck Lake, outside Batoche.
The force formed part of the military response to the North-West Rebellion in 1885, but faced criticism for their performance during the conflict.

Cree

Cree peopleNehiyawCree Nation
A number of factors have created the misconception that the Cree and Métis were acting in unison.
In the run-up to the 1885 North-West Rebellion, Big Bear was the leader of his band, but once the fighting started Wandering Spirit became war leader.

Edgar Dewdney

Dewdney
Although he quietly signalled to Ottawa that these two incidents were the result of desperate and starving people and were, as such, unrelated to the rebellion, Edgar Dewdney, the lieutenant-governor of the territories, publicly claimed that the Cree and the Métis had joined forces.
Additionally, as Indian Commissioner, Dewdney subsequently tackled issues pertaining to the North-West Rebellion of 1885.

Fish Creek (Saskatchewan)

Fish CreekFish Creek, SaskatchewanTourond's Coulee
After the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870, many of the Métis moved from Manitoba to the Fort Carlton region of the Northwest Territories, where they founded the Southbranch settlements of Fish Creek, Batoche, St. Laurent, St. Louis, and Duck Lake on or near the South Saskatchewan River.
It is most famous as the site of the Battle of Tourond's Coulee/Fish Creek during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885 between General Frederick Middleton of the Canadian Militia and Gabriel Dumont, adjutant general of the Metis Provisional Government of Saskatchewan.

Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis people
The North-West Rebellion of 1885 was a rebellion by the Métis people under Louis Riel and an associated uprising by First Nations Cree and Assiniboine of the District of Saskatchewan against the government of Canada. A number of factors have created the misconception that the Cree and Métis were acting in unison.
They suffered defeat by Canadian armed forces in a conflict known as the North West Rebellion, which occurred in northern Saskatchewan from March 26 to May 12, 1885.

Albert Lacombe

Father Albert LacombeFather LacombeFr. Albert Lacombe
The Catholic priest, Albert Lacombe, worked to obtain assurances from Crowfoot that his Blackfoot warriors would not participate in a rebellion.
He is now remembered for having brokered a peace between the Cree and Blackfoot, negotiating construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway through Blackfoot territory, and securing a promise from the Blackfoot leader Crowfoot to refrain from joining the North-West Rebellion of 1885.

Charles Nolin

A smaller number opposed him, led by Charles Nolin.
Charles Nolin (2 March 1838 – 28 January 1907) was a Métis farmer and political organizer noted for his role in the opposition of the North-West Resistance of 1885.

Prince Albert Volunteers

52nd Regiment (Prince Albert Volunteers)Prince Albert and Battleford Volunteers
On March 26, 1885, the 150 to 200 Métis and Aboriginal warriors under the command of Gabriel Dumont defeated a combined group of 90 Prince Albert Volunteers and North-West Mounted Police led by their superintendent Leif Newry Fitzroy Crozier at Battle of Duck Lake, outside Batoche.
The Prince Albert Volunteers or Prince Albert Rifles were organized in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, North-West Territories, for service in the Canadian Militia during the North-West Rebellion.

Frederick Dobson Middleton

Frederick MiddletonMiddletonGeneral Middleton
The federal government had, shortly before the battle at Duck Lake, sent Major General Frederick Middleton to the West.
General Sir Frederick Dobson Middleton (4 November 1825 – 25 January 1898) was a British general noted for his service throughout the Empire and particularly in the North-West Rebellion.

Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

Prince AlbertPrince Albert, SKIsbister's Settlement
The largest settlement and the capital of the district was Prince Albert with about 800 people followed by Battleford with about 500 people who were "divided about equally between French, Métis and English".
In the Northwest Rebellion of the 1885, Prince Albert Volunteers bore the heaviest casualties of the fighting at the Battle of Duck Lake.

Crowfoot

Chief CrowfootThe Ballad of CrowfootCrowfoot (Isapo-Muxika)
The Catholic priest, Albert Lacombe, worked to obtain assurances from Crowfoot that his Blackfoot warriors would not participate in a rebellion.
While many believe Chief Crowfoot had no part in the North-West Rebellion, he did in fact participate to an extent due to his son's connection to the conflict.

Fort Battleford

Fort Battleford National Historic Site
The inhabitants fled to the nearby North-West Mounted Police post, Fort Battleford.
Fort Battleford was the sixth North-West Mounted Police fort to be established in the Northwest Territories of Canada, and played a central role in the events of the North-West Rebellion / Resistance of 1885.