North American fur trade

fur tradefur tradersfur tradingfur traderfurfur trade erafur trade in North Americafur trade routefur trappersthe fur trade
The North American fur trade was industry and activity related to the acquisition, trade, exchange, and sale of animal furs in North America.wikipedia
461 Related Articles

New Netherland

New NetherlandsDutchNieuw-Nederland
The French started trading in the 16th century, the English established trading posts on Hudson Bay in present-day Canada during the 17th century, while the Dutch had trade by the same time in New Netherland.
The colony was conceived by the Dutch West India Company (WIC) in 1621 to capitalize on the North American fur trade.

American Fur Company

American Fur Trading CompanyAmerican Fur Trading Co.1832 expedition
The American Fur Company and some other companies failed.
Astor capitalized on anti-British sentiments and his commercial strategies to become one of the first trusts in American business and a major competitor to the British commercial dominance in North American fur trade.

New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
The discovery of the superior felting qualities of beaver fur, along with the rapidly increasing popularity of beaver felt hats in fashion, transformed the incidental trading of fishermen in the sixteenth century into a growing trade in the French and later English territories in the next century.
Here French economic interests would shift and concentrate itself on the development of the North American fur trade.

Population history of indigenous peoples of the Americas

Population history of American indigenous peoplesNative American populationpopulations
More significantly, new infectious diseases brought by the French decimated native groups and broke up their communities.
For example, during the late 1630s, smallpox killed over half of the Wyandot (Huron), who controlled most of the early North American fur trade in what became Canada.

Voyageurs

voyageurexperienced companionsFrench explorers
Licensed voyageurs, allied with Montreal merchants, used water routes to reach the far-flung corners of the North West with canoe loads of trade goods.
The voyageurs were French Canadians who engaged in the transporting of furs by canoe during the fur trade years.

Coureur des bois

coureurs des boisvoyageurcoureurs de bois
Unlicensed independent traders, known as coureurs des bois (or "runners of the woods"), began to do business in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.
These expeditions were part of the beginning of the fur trade in the North American interior.

Fort Frontenac

CataraquiCataracouiFort Cataracoui
To bolster these territorial claims, the French constructed a series of small fortifications, beginning with Fort Frontenac on Lake Ontario in 1673.
The intent of Fort Frontenac was to control the lucrative fur trade in the Great Lakes Basin to the west and the Canadian Shield to the north.

Iroquois

Iroquois ConfederacyHaudenosauneeSix Nations
Champlain supported the northern groups in their preexisting military struggle with the Iroquois Confederacy to the south.
Many Iroquois (mostly Mohawk) and Iroquois-descended Métis people living in Lower Canada (primarily at Kahnawake) took employment with the Montreal-based North West Company during its existence from 1779 to 1821 and became voyageurs or free traders working in the North American fur trade as far west as the Rocky Mountains.

Pierre-Esprit Radisson

RadissonPierre Esprit RadissonPierre Radisson
The 1659–1660 voyage of French traders Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard Chouart des Groseilliers into the country north and west of Lake Superior symbolically opened this new era of expansion.
The reason for the year-long trip was to collect furs, in order to participate in the ever-lucrative fur trade.

Métis buffalo hunt

buffalo huntersPemmicanannual buffalo hunt
The Metis buffalo hunts were held at two times during a year by the Métis of the Red River settlements during the North American fur trade.

Chipewyan

DenesulineChipewyan peopleChipewyans
The Chipewyan began trading fur in exchange for metal tools and instruments with the Hudson's Bay Company in 1717, which caused a drastic change in their lifestyle, going from a people engage in daily subsidence activities to a people engaging in far-reaching trade as the Chipewyan become the middlemen between the Hudson's Bay Company and the other Indians living further inland.
Later, with the emerging North American fur trade, they organized into several major regional groups in the vicinity of the European trading posts to control, as middleman, the carrying trade in furs and the hunting of fur-bearing animals.

Henry Hudson

HudsonHendrik HudsonHudson, Henry
In contrast to "the huddy buddy narration of Canada as Hudson's country", propagated either in popular culture as well in elitist circles as the Beaver Club, founded 1785 in Montreal the often male-centered scholarly description of the fur business does not fully describe the history.
Besides numerous geographical features, Hudson is also the namesake of Hudson's Bay Company, known for its exploration of the vast Hudson Bay watershed and its decisive role in the North American fur trade in the following centuries.

Marriage 'à la façon du pays'

Marriage ''à la façon du pays''country marriageEuropean men married Aboriginal women
Marriage and kinship with native women would play an important role in the western fur trade.
Marriage à la façon du pays ("according to the custom of the country") refers to the practice of common-law marriage between European fur traders and aboriginal or Métis women in the North American fur trade.

British colonization of the Americas

BritishEnglishEnglish colonization of the Americas
Europeans established fisheries in the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, and traded metal, glass, and cloth for food and fur, beginning the North American fur trade.

York Factory

York Factory, ManitobaFort BourbonYork Fort
At York Factory in the 18th century, the factors reported that flotillas of up to 200 canoes would arrive at a time bearing Indian men coming to barter their fur for HBC's goods.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
Aboriginal peoples in Canada and Native Americans in the United States of various regions traded among themselves in the pre–Columbian Era.

Pre-Columbian era

pre-Columbianpre-Hispanicprehispanic
Aboriginal peoples in Canada and Native Americans in the United States of various regions traded among themselves in the pre–Columbian Era.

Hudson Bay

Hudson's BayHudsonBaie d'Hudson
The French started trading in the 16th century, the English established trading posts on Hudson Bay in present-day Canada during the 17th century, while the Dutch had trade by the same time in New Netherland.

Jacques Cartier

CartierCartier, JacquesFrench navigator and explorer
French explorer Jacques Cartier in his three voyages into the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the 1530s and 1540s conducted some of the earliest fur trading between European and First Nations peoples associated with sixteenth century and later explorations in North America.

Gulf of Saint Lawrence

Gulf of St. LawrenceGulf of St LawrenceGulf
French explorer Jacques Cartier in his three voyages into the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the 1530s and 1540s conducted some of the earliest fur trading between European and First Nations peoples associated with sixteenth century and later explorations in North America.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
French explorer Jacques Cartier in his three voyages into the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the 1530s and 1540s conducted some of the earliest fur trading between European and First Nations peoples associated with sixteenth century and later explorations in North America. Cartier attempted limited fur trading with the First Nations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and along the St. Lawrence River.

Saint Lawrence River

St. Lawrence RiverSt Lawrence RiverSt. Lawrence
Cartier attempted limited fur trading with the First Nations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and along the St. Lawrence River.

North American beaver

beaverCastor canadensisbeavers
He overlooked the fur that would become the driving force of the fur trade in the north, the beaver pelt, which would become fashionable in Europe.

Atlantic cod

codNorthern CodCod, Atlantic
The earliest European trading for beaver pelts dated to the growing cod fishing industry that spread to the Grand Banks of the North Atlantic in the 16th century.

Grand Banks of Newfoundland

Grand BanksNewfoundland BanksGreat Banks
The earliest European trading for beaver pelts dated to the growing cod fishing industry that spread to the Grand Banks of the North Atlantic in the 16th century.