North Carolina

Ceremony of Secotan warriors in North Carolina. Watercolour painted by English colonist John White in 1585.
1st Maryland Regiment holding the line at the Battle of Guilford Court House, 1781
Map of the roads and railroads of North Carolina, 1854
Union troops capture Fort Fisher, 1865
Bennett Place historic site in Durham
Segregated drinking fountain during the Jim Crow era in Halifax
First successful flight of the Wright Flyer, near Kitty Hawk, 1903
North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, 2008
Deer in the Eno River as it flows through the Piedmont region of North Carolina
Köppen climate types of North Carolina
Cullasaja Falls in Macon County
Graveyard Fields in the fall
The Blue Ridge Mountains of the Shining Rock Wilderness Area
North Carolina population density map (2010)
majority-minority counties in North Carolina (2020 Census)
Fiddlin' Bill Hensley, mountain fiddler, Asheville, 1937
2008 Lexington Barbecue Festival
USS North Carolina on permanent display in Wilmington
Troopers of the 82nd Airborne Division training on Fort Bragg, March 2011
Biltmore Estate, Asheville
A lesson at New Kituwah Academy on the Qualla Boundary in North Carolina. This bilingual language immersion school, operated by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, teaches the same curriculum as other state elementary schools
A North Carolina license plate
North Carolina State Legislative Building
John White returns to find the colony abandoned
Map of the coast of Virginia and North Carolina, drawn 1585–1586 by Theodor de Bry, based on map by John White of the Roanoke Colony
Reconstructed royal governor's mansion Tryon Palace in New Bern
3D Topographical Map of North Carolina

State in the Southeastern region of the United States.

- North Carolina

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Charlotte metropolitan area

Fury 325 at Carowinds
Bank of America Stadium, home of the Carolina Panthers and Charlotte FC
Bank of America Corporate Center, the world headquarters for Bank of America

The Charlotte metropolitan area or Metrolina is a metropolitan area of the U.S. states of North and South Carolina, within and surrounding the city of Charlotte.

IBM's Research Triangle Park facility, pictured in around 1982

Research Triangle Park

Largest research park in the United States.

Largest research park in the United States.

IBM's Research Triangle Park facility, pictured in around 1982

The Research Triangle region of North Carolina received its name as an extension of the name of the park.

The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

Outer Banks

The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)
View from the International Space Station in 2019 (north in the lower left)
Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right
Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, Hatteras, North Carolina, June 2007
Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck (2009)
The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October 2008)
Sunset over Avon
Jockey's Ridge State Park

The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a 200 mi string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States.

Confederate States of America

Unrecognized breakaway republic in North America that existed from February 8, 1861, to May 9, 1865.

Unrecognized breakaway republic in North America that existed from February 8, 1861, to May 9, 1865.

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Map of the division of the states in the American Civil War (1861–1865). Blue indicates the northern Union states; light blue represents five Union slave states (border states) that primarily stayed in Union control. Red represents southern seceded states in rebellion, also known as the Confederate States of America. Uncolored areas were U.S. territories, with the exception of the Indian Territory (later Oklahoma).
Evolution of the Confederate States, December 20, 1860 – July 15, 1870
Alexander H. Stephens, Confederate Vice President; author of the 'Cornerstone Speech'
The inauguration of Jefferson Davis in Montgomery, Alabama
Elias Boudinot, Cherokee secessionist, Rep. Indian Territory
William T. Sutherlin mansion, Danville, Virginia, temporary residence of Jefferson Davis and dubbed "Last Capitol of the Confederacy"
Map of the county secession votes of 1860–1861 in Appalachia within the ARC definition. Virginia and Tennessee show the public votes, while the other states show the vote by county delegates to the conventions.
The Seal, symbols of an independent agricultural Confederacy surrounding an equestrian Washington, sword encased
Recruitment poster: "Do not wait to be drafted". Under half re-enlisted.
Unionists throughout the Confederate States resisted the 1862 conscription
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy from 1861 to 1865
Davis's cabinet in 1861, Montgomery, Alabama
Front row, left to right: Judah P. Benjamin, Stephen Mallory, Alexander H. Stephens, Jefferson Davis, John Henninger Reagan, and Robert Toombs
Back row, standing left to right: Christopher Memminger and LeRoy Pope Walker
Illustration printed in Harper's Weekly
Provisional Congress, Montgomery, Alabama
surviving Confederate mail
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Main railroads of Confederacy, 1861; colors show the different gauges (track width); the top railroad shown in the upper right is the Baltimore and Ohio, which was at all times a Union railroad
Passers-by abusing the bodies of Union supporters near Knoxville, Tennessee. The two were hanged by Confederate authorities near the railroad tracks so passing train passengers could see them.
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Richmond bread riot, 1863
Confederate memorial tombstone at Natchez City Cemetery in Natchez, Mississippi
This Confederate Flag pattern is the one most often thought of as the Confederate Flag today; it was one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. Variations of this design served as the Battle Flag of the Armies of Northern Virginia and Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
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A Home on the Mississippi, Currier and Ives, 1871
St. John's Episcopal Church, Montgomery. The Secession Convention of Southern Churches was held here in 1861.
Major-General John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War (1865)
General Robert E. Lee, General in Chief (1865)
William L. Yancey, {{small|Alabama Fire-Eater, "The Orator of Secession"}}
William Henry Gist, {{small|Governor of South Carolina, called the Secessionist Convention}}
CSA Naval Jack
{{small|Battle Flag – square}}
Gen. Gabriel J. Rains, {{small|Conscription Bureau chief, April 1862 – May 1863}}
Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, {{small|military recruiter under Bragg, then J.E. Johnston<ref>Coulter, The Confederates States of America, p. 324.</ref>}}
Joseph E. Brown, governor of Georgia
Pendleton Murrah, governor of Texas
Jesse J. Finley
Henry R. Jackson
Asa Biggs
Andrew Magrath
John H. Reagan
Jefferson Davis, 5 cent
Andrew Jackson
George Washington
Potters House, Atlanta Ga
Downtown Charleston SC
Navy Yard, Norfolk Va
Rail bridge, Petersburg Va
1st National Flag
2nd National Flag
3rd National Flag
Battle Flag

They were South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina.

The James River winds its way among Piedmont hills in central Virginia. Most of the hills in the Piedmont region are smaller than these.

Piedmont (United States)

Plateau region located in the Eastern United States.

Plateau region located in the Eastern United States.

The James River winds its way among Piedmont hills in central Virginia. Most of the hills in the Piedmont region are smaller than these.
The Piedmont Plateau, looking east from Rocky Ridge in Maryland, c. 1898
The Piedmont plateau region (shaded)

The width of the Piedmont varies, being quite narrow above the Delaware River but nearly 300 miles (475 km) wide in North Carolina.

Kitty Hawk, North Carolina

Kitty Hawk is a town in Dare County, North Carolina, United States, and is a part of what is known as North Carolina's Outer Banks.

Pre-contact distribution of the Catawba

Catawba people

The Catawba, also known as Issa, Essa or Iswä but most commonly Iswa (Catawba: Ye Iswąˀ – "people of the river"), are a federally recognized tribe of Native Americans, known as the Catawba Indian Nation. Their current lands are in South Carolina, on the Catawba River, near the city of Rock Hill.

The Catawba, also known as Issa, Essa or Iswä but most commonly Iswa (Catawba: Ye Iswąˀ – "people of the river"), are a federally recognized tribe of Native Americans, known as the Catawba Indian Nation. Their current lands are in South Carolina, on the Catawba River, near the city of Rock Hill.

Pre-contact distribution of the Catawba
A c. 1724 annotated copy of a deerskin Catawba map of the tribes between Charleston (left) and Virginia (right) following the displacements of a century of disease and enslavement and the 1715–7 Yamasee War. The Catawba are labelled as "Nasaw".
Catawba at The Corn Exposition 1913, Rock Hill, South Carolina
The Catawba women are well known in the Carolinas for their pottery.
A Catawba family in 1908 South Carolina.

Their territory once extended into North Carolina, as well, and they still have legal claim to some parcels of land in that state.

Detail of Diego Gutiérrez's 1562 map of the Western Hemisphere, showing the first known use of a variation of the place name "Appalachia" ("Apalchen") – from the map Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio

Appalachian Mountains

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America.

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America.

Detail of Diego Gutiérrez's 1562 map of the Western Hemisphere, showing the first known use of a variation of the place name "Appalachia" ("Apalchen") – from the map Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio
Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia
Bald Mountains seen from Tennessee
Shaded relief map of the Cumberland Plateau and Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians on the Virginia–West Virginia border
Old fault exposed by roadcut near Hazleton, Pennsylvania, along Interstate 81, such faults are common in the folded Appalachians
Cliffs overlooking the New River near Gauley Bridge, West Virginia
Paleogeographic reconstruction showing the Appalachian Basin area during the Middle Devonian period
USGS Appalachian zones in the United States
View from Mount Mitchell, North Carolina, at 6684 ft the highest peak east of the Mississippi River
Shenandoah National Park in Virginia
The view from Craggy Gardens on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina
Great laurel thicket in the Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina
Cranberry Glades, a bog preserve in West Virginia
Grassy balds on the Roan Highlands straddling the North Carolina/Tennessee border
Alpine tundra on Mount Washington, high point of the White Mountains of New Hampshire
Southern flying squirrel
Male eastern wild turkey

The system is divided into a series of ranges, with the individual mountains averaging around 3000 ft. The highest of the group is Mount Mitchell in North Carolina at 6684 ft, which is the highest point in the United States east of the Mississippi River.

Cherokee

The Cherokee ( ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ, or ᏣᎳᎩ) are one of the indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands of the United States.

The Cherokee ( ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ, or ᏣᎳᎩ) are one of the indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands of the United States.

Great Smoky Mountains
An annotated copy of a hand-painted Catawba deerskin map of the tribes between Charleston (left) and Virginia (right) following the displacements of a century of disease and enslavement and the 1715–7 Yamasee War. The Cherokee are labelled as "Cherrikies".
After the Anglo-Cherokee War, bitterness remained between the two groups. In 1765, Henry Timberlake took three Cherokee chiefs to London meet the Crown and help strengthen the newly declared peace.
Portrait of Major Ridge in 1834, from History of the Indian Tribes of North America.
Cherokee National Council building, New Echota
Tah-Chee (Dutch), A Cherokee Chief, 1837
Chief John Ross, c. 1840
Cherokee beadwork sampler, made at Dwight Mission, Indian Territory, 19th century, collection of the Oklahoma History Center
Cól-lee, a Band Chief, painted by George Catlin, 1834
Cherokee confederates reunion in New Orleans, 1902.
William Penn (Cherokee), His Shield (Yanktonai), Levi Big Eagle (Yanktonai), Bear Ghost (Yanktonai) and Black Moustache (Sisseton).
Map of present-day Cherokee Nation Tribal Jurisdiction Area (red)
Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary
Flag of the Cherokee Nation
Cherokee Nation Historic Courthouse in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
The Cherokee Female Seminary was built in 1889 by the Cherokee in Indian Territory.
Flag of the Eastern Band Cherokee
Flag of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians
The Mount Tabor Indian Community flag of primarily Cherokee as well as Choctaw, Chickasaw and Muscogee-Creek people located in Rusk County, Texas.

Prior to the 18th century, they were concentrated in their homelands, in towns along river valleys of what is now southwestern North Carolina, southeastern Tennessee, edges of western South Carolina, northern Georgia and northeastern Alabama.

Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka

Oceanic climate

[[File:Koppen World Map Cfb Cfc Cwb Cwc.png|upright=1.8|thumb|right|World map showing oceanic climate zones

[[File:Koppen World Map Cfb Cfc Cwb Cwc.png|upright=1.8|thumb|right|World map showing oceanic climate zones

Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka
São Joaquim, Brazil

The North Atlantic Gulf Stream, a tropical oceanic current that passes north of the Caribbean and up the East Coast of the United States to North Carolina, then heads east-northeast to the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, is thought to greatly modify the climate of Northwest Europe.