North India

Northern IndianorthernNorth IndianNorthUpper IndiaNorthern Indiannorthern partnorthern statesIndiaN. India
North India is a loosely defined region consisting of the northern part of India.wikipedia
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Mughal Empire

MughalMughalsMughal India
North India has been the historical centre of the Mughal, Delhi Sultanate and British Indian Empire.
The Mughal Empire is conventionally said to have been founded in 1526 by Babur, a warrior chieftain from what today is Uzbekistan, who employed aid from the neighboring Safavid and Ottoman empires to defeat the Sultan of Delhi, Ibrahim Lodhi, in the First Battle of Panipat, and to sweep down the plains of Upper India.

Allahabad

PrayagrajPrayagAllahbad
It has a diverse culture, and includes the Hindu pilgrimage centres of Char Dham, Haridwar, Varanasi, Ayodhya, Mathura, Allahabad, Vaishno Devi and Pushkar, the Buddhist pilgrimage centres of Sarnath and Kushinagar, the Sikh Golden Temple as well as world heritage sites such as the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, Khajuraho temples, Hill Forts of Rajasthan, Jantar Mantar (Jaipur), Bhimbetka Caves, Sanchi monuments, Qutb Minar, Red Fort, Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri and the Taj Mahal.
As of 2011, Allahabad is the seventh most populous city in the state, twelfth in Northern India and thirty-eighth in India, with an estimated population of 1.11 million in the city and 1.21 million in its metropolitan region.

Administrative divisions of India

RegionDivisionMajor villages
The term North India has varying definitions—the Ministry of Home Affairs in its Northern Zonal Council Administrative division included the states of Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir, Punjab and Rajasthan and Union Territories of Delhi, Chandigarh.

Rajasthan

Rajasthan, IndiaRajasthan StateRajastan
The term North India has varying definitions—the Ministry of Home Affairs in its Northern Zonal Council Administrative division included the states of Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir, Punjab and Rajasthan and Union Territories of Delhi, Chandigarh.
Up to the 10th century AD, almost all of North India acknowledged the supremacy of the Gurjars, with their seat of power at Kannauj.

Hindi

Hindi languageHindi-languageStandard Hindi
The languages that have official status in one or more of the states and union territories located in North India are Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi and English.
Modern Hindi is the standardised and Sanskritised register of the Hindustani language, which itself is based primarily on the Khariboli dialect of Delhi and other nearby areas of Northern India.

Delhi

Delhi, IndiaNational Capital Territory of DelhiNational Capital Territory
The term North India has varying definitions—the Ministry of Home Affairs in its Northern Zonal Council Administrative division included the states of Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir, Punjab and Rajasthan and Union Territories of Delhi, Chandigarh.
Delhi is located in Northern India, at 28.61°N, 77.23°W.

Urdu

Urdu languageUrdu:Hindi
The languages that have official status in one or more of the states and union territories located in North India are Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi and English.
The Urdu variant of Hindustani received recognition and patronage under British rule when the British replaced the local official languages with English and Hindustani written in Nastaʿlīq script, as the official language in North and Northwestern India.

Harsha

HarshavardhanaEmpire of HarshaHarshavardhan
590–647 CE), also known as Harshavardhana, was an Indian emperor who ruled North India from 606 to 647 CE.

Aravalli Range

AravalliAravalli hillsAravali
To its west is the Thar desert, shared between North India and Pakistan and the Aravalli Range, beyond which lies the state of Gujarat.
The Aravalli Range (Devanagari, also spelled Aravali range, is a range of mountains running approximately 692 km (430 mi) in a southwest direction, starting in North India from Delhi and passing through southern Haryana, through to Western India across the states of Rajasthan and ending in Gujarat.

Varanasi

BenaresBanarasKashi
It has a diverse culture, and includes the Hindu pilgrimage centres of Char Dham, Haridwar, Varanasi, Ayodhya, Mathura, Allahabad, Vaishno Devi and Pushkar, the Buddhist pilgrimage centres of Sarnath and Kushinagar, the Sikh Golden Temple as well as world heritage sites such as the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, Khajuraho temples, Hill Forts of Rajasthan, Jantar Mantar (Jaipur), Bhimbetka Caves, Sanchi monuments, Qutb Minar, Red Fort, Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri and the Taj Mahal.
Varanasi is located at an elevation of 80.71 m in the centre of the Ganges valley of North India, in the Eastern part of the state of Uttar Pradesh, along the left crescent-shaped bank of the Ganges, averaging between 50 ft and 70 ft above the river.

Maratha Empire

MarathaMarathasMaratha Confederacy
Ten years after Panipat, the young Peshwa Madhavrao I's Maratha Resurrection reinstated Maratha authority over North India.

Pakistan

Islamic Republic of PakistanPAKPakistani
To its west is the Thar desert, shared between North India and Pakistan and the Aravalli Range, beyond which lies the state of Gujarat.
The Pala Dynasty was the last Buddhist empire, which, under Dharmapala and Devapala, stretched across South Asia from what is now Bangladesh through Northern India to Pakistan.

Jat people

JatJatsJatt
The people of North India mostly belong to the Indo-Aryan ethno linguistic branch, and include various ethnic groups such as Brahmins, Rajputs, Banias, Jats, Ahirs, Gurjars, Kolis, Khatris, Kambojs and Dalits.
The Jat people (, spelling variants include Jatt, Jaat and Jutt) are a traditionally agricultural community native to the Indian subcontinent, comprising what is today Northern India and Pakistan.

Rajput

RajputsRajputs of GujaratHindu Rajput
The people of North India mostly belong to the Indo-Aryan ethno linguistic branch, and include various ethnic groups such as Brahmins, Rajputs, Banias, Jats, Ahirs, Gurjars, Kolis, Khatris, Kambojs and Dalits.
Several Rajput-ruled kingdoms played a significant role in many regions of central and northern India until the 20th century.

Gurjar

GujjarGujjarsGujar
The people of North India mostly belong to the Indo-Aryan ethno linguistic branch, and include various ethnic groups such as Brahmins, Rajputs, Banias, Jats, Ahirs, Gurjars, Kolis, Khatris, Kambojs and Dalits.
Historical references speak of Gurjara warriors and commoners in North India in the 7th century CE, and mention several Gurjara kingdoms and dynasties.

Hindi Belt

HindiHindi dialectsHindi dialect
A large part of North India is taken up by the so-called Hindi Belt, which here subsumes most of the Rajasthani languages, dialects of Western Hindi, Bhojpuri, Awadhi, Garhwali and Kumaoni.
The Hindi Belt or Hindi Heartland or Hindi Patti, is a linguistic region encompassing parts of northern, central, eastern and western India where Hindi (and the various languages/dialects grouped under it) are widely spoken.

Ahir

AhirsAbhirAhir caste
The people of North India mostly belong to the Indo-Aryan ethno linguistic branch, and include various ethnic groups such as Brahmins, Rajputs, Banias, Jats, Ahirs, Gurjars, Kolis, Khatris, Kambojs and Dalits.
They are known by numerous other names, including Gauli, Ghosi, Gop, Rao Saab in the north.

Awadhi language

AwadhiAvadhiawa
A large part of North India is taken up by the so-called Hindi Belt, which here subsumes most of the Rajasthani languages, dialects of Western Hindi, Bhojpuri, Awadhi, Garhwali and Kumaoni.
Awadhi is an Eastern Hindi language of the Indo-Aryan branch spoken in northern India.

Sikhism

SikhSikhsSikh religion
Other religions practiced by various ethnic communities include Islam, Sikhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Bahá'í, Christianity, and Buddhism.
The majority of Sikh scriptures were originally written in the Gurmukhī alphabet, a script standardised by Guru Angad out of Laṇḍā scripts used in North India.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
Hinduism is the dominant religion in North India.
It is believed that Hindu was used as the name for the Indus River in the northwestern part of the Indian subcontinent (modern day Pakistan and Northern India).

Punjab

Punjab regionPanjabPunjabi
Among the well-known folk dances are the bhangra of the Punjab, Ghoomar of Rajasthan and rouf and bhand pather of Kashmir.
The Punjab (,, ; native pronunciation: ), also spelled and romanised as Panjāb, is a geopolitical, cultural and historical region in South Asia, specifically in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, comprising areas of eastern Pakistan and northern India.

Kamboj

KambohMuslim KambohKamboj in Muslim and British Era
The people of North India mostly belong to the Indo-Aryan ethno linguistic branch, and include various ethnic groups such as Brahmins, Rajputs, Banias, Jats, Ahirs, Gurjars, Kolis, Khatris, Kambojs and Dalits.
The Kamboj (undefined ALA-LC:, ਕੰਬੋ Kamboj), also Kamboh, is a community mainly in the Northern India and eastern Pakistan.

Kathak

Kathak danceKathak dancerkathak dancing
Main dance forms, many with narrative forms and mythological elements, have been accorded classical dance status by India's National Academy of Music, Dance, and Drama such as Kathak''.
The origin of Kathak is traditionally attributed to the traveling bards of ancient northern India known as Kathakars or storytellers.

Indo-Aryan languages

Indo-AryanIndo-Aryan languageIndic
Linguistically, North India is dominated by Indo-Aryan languages.
The Indo-Aryan languages of North India and Pakistan form a dialect continuum.

Delhi Sultanate

Sultanate of DelhiSultan of DelhiDelhi
North India has been the historical centre of the Mughal, Delhi Sultanate and British Indian Empire.
Paper manufacturing eventually became widespread across Northern India following the establishment of the Delhi Sultanate in the 13th century, and eventually spread to Southern India between the 15th and 16th centuries.