Northampton

Northampton, EnglandNorthampton, NorthamptonshireNorthampton CBNorthampton County BoroughNorthhamptonSemilongCivic Church of All Saints', NorthamptonCounty Borough of Northamptoneponymous townGreater Northampton
Northampton is a large market town and the county town of Northamptonshire in the East Midlands of England.wikipedia
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East Midlands

EastEast MidlandEast Midlanders
Northampton is a large market town and the county town of Northamptonshire in the East Midlands of England.
There are six main urban centres, Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Mansfield, Northampton and Nottingham.

Northamptonshire

NorthantsCounty of NorthamptonNorthamptonshire, England
Northampton is a large market town and the county town of Northamptonshire in the East Midlands of England.
Apart from the county town of Northampton, other major population centres include Kettering, Corby, Wellingborough, Rushden and Daventry.

River Nene

NeneNene ValleyNene River
It lies on the River Nene, 60 mi north-west of London and 45 mi south-east of Birmingham.
It is the tenth-longest river in the United Kingdom, and is navigable for 88 mi, from Northampton to The Wash.

University of Northampton (13th century)

University of NorthamptonNorthampton13th century University of Northampton
Medieval Northampton had many churches, monasteries and the University of Northampton, all enclosed by the town walls.
The University of Northampton was based in Northampton, England, from 1261 to 1265.

Battle of Northampton (1460)

Battle of NorthamptonNorthampton1460
The town was also the site of two medieval battles, in 1264 and 1460.
The Battle of Northampton was fought on 10 July 1460 near the River Nene, Northamptonshire.

Grand Union Canal

Warwick and Birmingham CanalGrand UnionWarwick and Napton Canal
Northampton continued to grow with the arrival of the Grand Union Canal and the railways in the 19th century, becoming a centre for footwear and leather manufacture.
It has arms to places including Leicester, Slough, Aylesbury, Wendover and Northampton.

Great Fire of Northampton

The Great Fire of Northampton in 1675 destroyed much of the town.
The Great Fire of Northampton occurred in September 1675 in Northampton in Northamptonshire, England.

County town

administrative centrecounty townscounty seat
Northampton is a large market town and the county town of Northamptonshire in the East Midlands of England.

Duston

Duston, Northamptonshire
In the Roman period, a small rural settlement is thought to have existed in the present-day district of Duston; remains of Roman pottery were found there.
Duston is a suburb of and civil parish in the borough of Northampton, Northamptonshire, England.

All Saints' Church, Northampton

All Saints' ChurchAll SaintsAll Saints Church
de Senlis founded the Cluniac Priory of St Andrew's—where St Andrew's Hospital now stands—and built The Church of the Holy Sepulchre—one of four remaining round churches in England—and All Hallows Church on the current site of All Saint's Church.
All Saints' Church, Northampton situated in the centre of Northampton, is a Church of England parish church.

St Andrew's Hospital

Northampton General Lunatic AsylumNorthamptonshire County General Lunatic AsylumNorthampton Hospital
de Senlis founded the Cluniac Priory of St Andrew's—where St Andrew's Hospital now stands—and built The Church of the Holy Sepulchre—one of four remaining round churches in England—and All Hallows Church on the current site of All Saint's Church.
St Andrews Hospital is a mental health facility in Northampton, England.

The Holy Sepulchre, Northampton

Holy SepulchreSt SepulchreThe Holy Sepulchre
de Senlis founded the Cluniac Priory of St Andrew's—where St Andrew's Hospital now stands—and built The Church of the Holy Sepulchre—one of four remaining round churches in England—and All Hallows Church on the current site of All Saint's Church.
The Holy Sepulchre is a Norman round church in Sheep Street, Northampton, England.

St Peter's Church, Northampton

St Peter's ChurchAgnes PalmerSt Peter
His son, Simon II de Senlis, built St Peter's Church on a site between a former Anglo-Saxon palace and Northampton Castle.
St Peter's Church is a redundant Anglican church in Marefair, Northampton, England.

Hunsbury Hill

Present-day Hunsbury Hill is an example of this settlement; a circular ditch and a bank faced with a wall of timber and enclosing an area of 160 acres which dates to around 400 BC.
Hunsbury Hill is an Iron Age hill fort two miles (3 km) south-west of the centre of the town of Northampton in the county of Northamptonshire.

Delapré Abbey

Delapre AbbeyDelapre ParkDelapré Park
Simon II de Senlis also founded Delapré Abbey—another Cluniac priory—which still stands today.
The mansion and outbuildings incorporate remains of a former monastery, the Abbey of St Mary de la Pré (the suffix meaning "in or of the Meadow"), near the River Nene 1 mi south south-east of Northampton.

St Andrew's Priory, Northampton

Priory of St AndrewSt Andrew's PrioryCluniac priory of St Andrew
de Senlis founded the Cluniac Priory of St Andrew's—where St Andrew's Hospital now stands—and built The Church of the Holy Sepulchre—one of four remaining round churches in England—and All Hallows Church on the current site of All Saint's Church.
St Andrew's Priory was a Cluniac house in Northampton, England.

Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton

Treaty of Edinburgh-NorthamptonTreaty of NorthamptonScotland's independence
Significant events in the castle's history include the trial of Thomas Becket in 1164, the publication of the Assize of Northampton in 1176, the declaration of peace with Scotland in the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton, the passage of the Statute of Northampton in 1328 and the imposition of poll tax in 1380.
The treaty was signed in Edinburgh by Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland, on 17 March 1328, and was ratified by the English Parliament at Northampton on 1 May.

Northampton Abbey of St James

Northampton AbbeySt James' AbbeyAbbey of Northampton
Other priories in medieval Northampton include St James' Abbey, Graye Friers, Blackfriars and Whitefriars.
The Northampton Abbey of St James was founded in Northampton in 1104-05 by William Peverel, as an Augustinian monastery for black canons, and was dedicated to St James.

Simon I de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton

Simon de SenlisSimon de Senlis, Earl of NorthamptonSimon de St Liz, Earl of Northampton
Northampton Castle is thought to have been built by Simon de Senlis, who became the first Earl of Northampton, circa 1084.
Sometime in the period, 1093–1100, he and his wife, Maud, founded the Priory of St Andrew's, Northampton.

Northampton's tunnels

network of medieval tunnels
A network of medieval tunnels remains under the centre of Northampton around All Saint's Church and the Market Square but their purpose,extent and significance have been disputed.
It is said by some that, underneath the streets of the town of Northampton in England, there remains a labyrinth of tunnels, along with many cellars and ancient crypts from the past.

Naseby

a villageNaseby Manor – alterations
Oliver Cromwell visited in 1645 and General Fairfax marched from the town to Naseby, where Charles I's Royalist army was decisively defeated.
The village is 14 mi (22.5 km) north of Northampton, 13.3 mi (21.4 km) northeast of Daventry, and 7 mi (11 km) south of Market Harborough.

Northampton railway station

NorthamptonNorthampton Castle stationKing's Heath depot
It is now known simply as Northampton railway station.
Northampton railway station serves the large town of Northampton in England.

Gibraltar Barracks, Northampton

Gibraltar BarracksNorthampton Barracks
A permanent military presence was established in the town with the completion of Gibraltar Barracks in 1797.
Gibraltar Barracks is a former military installation at Northampton in Northamptonshire.

Assize of Northampton

Significant events in the castle's history include the trial of Thomas Becket in 1164, the publication of the Assize of Northampton in 1176, the declaration of peace with Scotland in the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton, the passage of the Statute of Northampton in 1328 and the imposition of poll tax in 1380.
The assize is believed to have been passed at a council held in Northampton in January 1176.

Marvel's Mill

Marvell's Millroller-spinning mill
In 1741 Edward Cave opened Marvel's Mill, the world's first cotton mill to be driven by a water wheel.
Marvel's Mill or Marvell's Mill on the River Nene in Northampton, England, was the world's second factory for spinning cotton, the first to be operated as a water mill, and the first to be driven by an inanimate power-source.