A report on Veneto and Northern Italy

Venice, the primary tourist destination and the capital of Veneto
Ancient peoples of Northern Italy, with Celtic peoples shown in blue.
Lake Alleghe near Belluno
Migration of the Lombards towards Northern Italy
Cortina d'Ampezzo
Member cities of the first and second Lombard League.
The Piave River
Northern Italy after the Peace of Lodi
The Venetian Lagoon at sunset
The Iron Crown of Lombardy, for centuries a symbol of the Kings of Italy
Relief map of Veneto
Anti-Fascist Partisans in the streets of Bologna after the general insurrection of April 1945
The Adige in Verona
The Alps in Val Maira, Province of Cuneo
The Tetrarchs were the four co-rulers who governed the Roman Empire as long as Diocletian's reform lasted. Here they are portrayed embracing, in a posture of harmony, in a porphyry sculpture dating from the 4th century, produced in Anatolia, located today on a corner of St Mark's Basilica in Venice.
Farming landscape in the Po Plain at Sant'Agata Bolognese
The Horses of Saint Mark, brought as loot from Constantinople in 1204.
Alpine lakes like Lake Garda are characterised by warmer microclimates than the surrounding areas
An 18th-century view of Venice by Canaletto.
Fog on the Secchia River near Modena. Fog is a common occurrence in the Po Plain
The 13th-century Castel Brando in Cison di Valmarino, Treviso.
Languages and regional varieties in Italy
Veneto's provinces.
Milan
St Mark's Basilica, the seat of the Patriarch of Venice.
Genoa
The Punta San Vigilio on the Lake Garda
Turin
Kiss of Judas by Giotto, in Padua.
Giorgione's The Tempest.
The Prato della Valle in Padua, a work of Italian Renaissance architecture.
Villa Cornaro.
Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Love's Kiss.
The Church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice
A Golden bottle of Prosecco
Asiago cheese and crackers
A slice of tiramisù
Antonio Salieri
Antonio Vivaldi
Teatro La Fenice
The Arena of Verona
Teatro Salieri
Villa Barbaro
The Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Villa Badoer
Villa Malcontenta
Villa Pisani (Bagnolo)
The mount Antelao
Lastoi de Formin (Cadore)
The start of Strada delle 52 Gallerie
A trait that shows the structure of the Calà del Sasso

Non-administrative, it consists of eight administrative Regions in northern Italy: Aosta Valley, Piedmont, Liguria, Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Veneto, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige.

- Northern Italy

In 1167 an alliance (called the Lombard League) was formed among the Venetian cities such as Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, and Verona with other cities of Northern Italy to assert their rights against the Holy Roman Emperor.

- Veneto

14 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Italy

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Country that consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and several islands surrounding it; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region.

Country that consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and several islands surrounding it; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region.

Expansion of the territory called "Italy" from ancient Greece until Diocletian
The Iron Crown of Lombardy, for centuries a symbol of the Kings of Italy
Marco Polo, explorer of the 13th century, recorded his 24 years-long travels in the Book of the Marvels of the World, introducing Europeans to Central Asia and China.
The Italian states before the beginning of the Italian Wars in 1494
Leonardo da Vinci, the quintessential Renaissance man, in a self-portrait (ca. 1512, Royal Library, Turin)
Christopher Columbus leads an expedition to the New World, 1492. His voyages are celebrated as the discovery of the Americas from a European perspective, and they opened a new era in the history of humankind and sustained contact between the two worlds.
Flag of the Cispadane Republic, which was the first Italian tricolour adopted by a sovereign Italian state (1797)
Holographic copy of 1847 of Il Canto degli Italiani, the Italian national anthem since 1946
Animated map of the Italian unification from 1829 to 1871
The Victor Emmanuel II Monument in Rome, a national symbol of Italy celebrating the first king of the unified country, and resting place of the Italian Unknown Soldier since the end of World War I. It was inaugurated in 1911, on the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Unification of Italy.
The fascist dictator Benito Mussolini titled himself Duce and ruled the country from 1922 to 1943.
Areas controlled by the Italian Empire at its peak
Italian partisans in Milan during the Italian Civil War, April 1945
Alcide De Gasperi, first republican Prime Minister of Italy and one of the Founding Fathers of the European Union
The signing ceremony of the Treaty of Rome on 25 March 1957, creating the European Economic Community, forerunner of the present-day European Union
Funerals of the victims of the Bologna bombing of 2 August 1980, the deadliest attack ever perpetrated in Italy during the Years of Lead
Italian government task force to face the COVID-19 emergency
Topographic map of Italy
Dolphins in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the Aeolian Islands
National and regional parks in Italy
Gran Paradiso, established in 1922, is the oldest Italian national park.
The Italian wolf, the national animal of Italy
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map of Italy
The Chamber of Deputies is the lower house of Italy.
The Supreme Court of Cassation, Rome
An Alfa Romeo 159 vehicle of the Carabinieri corps
Group photo of the G7 leaders at the 43rd G7 summit in Taormina
Heraldic coat of arms of the Italian Armed Forces
A proportional representation of Italy exports, 2019
Milan is the economic capital of Italy, and is a global financial centre and a fashion capital of the world.
A Carrara marble quarry
The Autostrada dei Laghi ("Lakes Motorway"), the first motorway built in the world
FS' Frecciarossa 1000 high speed train, with a maximum speed of 400 km/h
Trieste, the main port of the northern Adriatic and starting point of the Transalpine Pipeline
ENI is considered one of the world's oil and gas "Supermajors".
Solar panels in Piombino. Italy is one of the world's largest producers of renewable energy.
Galileo Galilei, the father of modern science, physics and astronomy
Enrico Fermi, creator of the world's first first nuclear reactor
The Amalfi Coast is one of Italy's major tourist destinations.
Map of Italy's population density at the 2011 census
Italy is home to a large population of migrants from Eastern Europe and North Africa.
Linguistic map showing the languages spoken in Italy
Vatican City, the Holy See's sovereign territory
Bologna University, established in AD 1088, is the world's oldest academic institution.
Olive oil and vegetables are central to the Mediterranean diet.
Carnival of Venice
The Last Supper (1494–1499), Leonardo da Vinci, Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan
Michelangelo's David (1501–1504), Galleria dell'Accademia, Florence
The Birth of Venus (1484–1486), Sandro Botticelli, Uffizi Gallery, Florence
Dante shown holding a copy of the Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the mount of Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino's fresco, 1465
Niccolò Machiavelli, founder of modern political science and ethics
Pinocchio is one of the world's most translated books and a canonical piece of children's literature.
Clockwise from top left: Thomas Aquinas, proponent of natural theology and the Father of Thomism; Giordano Bruno, one of the major scientific figures of the Western world; Cesare Beccaria, considered the Father of criminal justice and modern criminal law; and Maria Montessori, credited with the creation of the Montessori education
La Scala opera house
Statues of Pantalone and Harlequin, two stock characters from the Commedia dell'arte, in the Museo Teatrale alla Scala
Dario Fo, one of the most widely performed playwrights in modern theatre, received international acclaim for his highly improvisational style.
Giacomo Puccini, Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Turandot, are among the most frequently worldwide performed in the standard repertoire
Luciano Pavarotti, considered one of the finest tenors of the 20th century and the "King of the High Cs"
Giorgio Moroder, pioneer of Italo disco and electronic dance music, is known as the "Father of disco".
Entrance to Cinecittà in Rome
The Azzurri in 2012. Football is the most popular sport in Italy.
Starting in 1909, the Giro d'Italia is the Grands Tours' second oldest.
A Ferrari SF21 by Scuderia Ferrari, the most successful Formula One team
Prada shop at Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan
The traditional recipe for spaghetti with tomato and basil sauce
Italian wine and salumi
The Frecce Tricolori, with the smoke trails representing the national colours of Italy, during the celebrations of the Festa della Repubblica
The Venice Film Festival is the oldest film festival in the world.

In addition to the various ancient peoples dispersed throughout what is now modern-day Italy, the most predominant being the Indo-European Italic peoples who gave the peninsula its name, beginning from the classical era, Phoenicians and Carthaginians founded colonies mostly in insular Italy, Greeks established settlements in the so-called Magna Graecia of Southern Italy, while Etruscans and Celts inhabited central and northern Italy respectively.

In 1866, Victor Emmanuel II allied with Prussia during the Austro-Prussian War, waging the Third Italian War of Independence which allowed Italy to annexe Venetia.

Lombardy

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One of the twenty administrative regions of Italy.

One of the twenty administrative regions of Italy.

Pizzo Coca is the highest peak in the Bergamasque Alps (3,050 m)
The Adda, the longest river within the region and tributary of the Po
The Alpine ibex (Capra ibex)
Moraine of Lake Garda
The Rock Drawings in Valcamonica are among the largest collections of prehistoric petroglyphs in the world.
For centuries, the Iron Crown of Lombardy was used in the Coronation of the King of Italy.
Member cities of the first and second Lombard League
Mantua as it appeared in 1575.
The Consulta of the République cisalpine receives the First Consul on 26 January 1802
The Five Days of Milan, 1848.
A view over the business district of Milan: with a metropolitan area of 7.4m people, it is Italy's most important industrial, commercial and financial center.
Palazzo Lombardia, the main seat of the government of Lombardy.
The provinces/metropolitan cities of Lombardy
The Rock Drawings in Valcamonica
The Last Supper, Convent of Sta. Maria delle Grazie, Milan, Italy (1499), by Leonardo da Vinci
The Fortified City of Bergamo
Remains of Roman forum in Brescia
Lake Garda
Lake Como
The Floating Piers by Christo and Jeanne-Claude on Lake Iseo (2016)
Grana Padano DPO
Gorgonzola cheese takes its name from the homonymous city near Milan
Risotto alla milanese with ossobuco
Tortelli di zucca with butter and sage
The auditorium of the Teatro alla Scala in Milan.
Dolce & Gabbana is headquartered in Milan.
Grana Padano (granular cheese)
Mascarpone (cream cheese)
Gorgonzola (blue-veined cheese)
Bitto (hard cheese)
Provolone Valpadana (pasta filata cheese)
Bottle of Franciacorta
Franciacorta Ferghettina
AgustaWestland AW109
Aermacchi M-345
Beretta 92
Beretta ARX160
Beretta PMX
Tanfoglio Combat
OTO Melara RSS Valour 76mm
Iveco Daily VII.Generation
Iveco EuroCargo IV.Generation
Same Iron 210
Lamborghini R6.150
BCS Valiant
BCS Vivid
Moto Guzzi V85 TT (Piaggio)
Moto Guzzi V7 Classic (Piaggio)
MV Agusta Turismo Veloce 800

It is bordered by Switzerland (north: Canton Ticino and Canton Graubünden) and by the Italian regions of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Veneto (east), Emilia-Romagna (south), and Piedmont (west).

Lombardy counts many protected areas: the most important are the Stelvio National Park (the largest Italian natural park), with typically alpine wildlife: red deer, roe deer, ibex, chamois, foxes, ermine and also golden eagles; and the Ticino Valley Natural Park, instituted in 1974 on the Lombard side of the Ticino River to protect and conserve one of the last major examples of fluvial forest in northern Italy.

Republic of Venice

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The Republic of Venice in 1789
The Doge of Venice, illustrated in the manuscript Théâtre de tous les peuples et nations de la terre avec leurs habits et ornemens divers, tant anciens que modernes, diligemment depeints au naturel. Painted by Lucas d'Heere in the 2nd half of the 16th century. Preserved by the Ghent University Library.
The Republic of Venice in 1789
The Venetia c 600 AD
The Venetia c 840 AD
Map of the Venetian Republic, circa 1000
Procession in St Mark's Square by Gentile Bellini in 1496
Leonardo Loredan, Doge of Venice during the War of the League of Cambrai.
The Venetian fort of Palamidi in Nafplion, Greece, one of many forts that secured Venetian trade routes in the Eastern Mediterranean.
Greater coat of arms of the Republic, with its various possessions and claims, in the aftermath of the Morean War
The Republic of Venice around 1700
Drawing of the Doge's Palace, late 14th century
The governmental structure of the Venetian Republic
The hearing given by the Doge in the Sala del Collegio in Doge's Palace by Francesco Guardi, 1775–80
The Flag of Veneto.
Siege of Tyre (1124) in the Holy Land
Siege of Constantinople (1203)
Voyage of Marco Polo into the Far East during the Pax Mongolica
The Piraeus Lion in Venice, in front of the Venetian Arsenal
Relief of the Venetian Lion on the Landward Gate in Zara (Zadar), capital of the Venetian Dalmatia
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Parenzo (Poreč)
Vicenza, Piazza dei Signori.
Udine, Piazza Libertà.
Piazza delle Erbe, Verona
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Cattaro (Kotor)
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Candia (Heraklion)
Relief of the Venetian Lion in Frangokastello, Crete
Venetian blazon with the Lion of Saint Mark, as frequently found on the New Fortress walls, Corfu.
The sack of Constantinople in 1204 on a mosaic in the San Giovanni Evangelista church in Ravenna, 1213

The Republic of Venice (Repubblica di Venezia; Repùblega de Venèsia) or Venetian Republic (Repubblica Veneta; Repùblega Vèneta), traditionally known as La Serenissima (Most Serene Republic of Venice; Serenissima Repubblica di Venezia; Serenìsima Res-piovega de Venèsia), was a sovereign state and maritime republic in parts of present-day Italy (mainly northeastern Italy) which existed for 1100 years from 697 AD until 1797 AD. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, it incorporated numerous overseas possessions in modern Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Greece, Albania and Cyprus.

The pope wanted Romagna; Emperor Maximilian I: Friuli and Veneto; Spain: the Apulian ports; the king of France: Cremona; the king of Hungary: Dalmatia, and each one some of another's part.

Padua

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Remnants of Padua's Roman amphitheatre wall
The Botanical Garden of Padova today; in the background, the Basilica of Sant'Antonio
Tomb of Antenor
The unfinished façade of Padua Cathedral
Clock tower and Lion of St. Mark, symbol of the Serenissima Repubblic
Last Judgment by Giotto, part of the Scrovegni Chapel.
Palazzo della Ragione
Botanical Garden (Orto Botanico).
Street tram in Padua
This tempera, Two Christians before the Judges, hangs in the city's Cathedral.
The apse area of Santa Sofia.
The "Gran Guardia" loggia
Prato della Valle (detail)
Loggia Amulea, as seen from Prato della Valle
Torre degli Anziani as seen from Piazza della Frutta
The Astronomical clock as seen from Piazza dei Signori

Padua (Padova ; Pàdova) is a city and comune in Veneto, northern Italy.

Annexed to Italy during 1866, Padua was at the centre of the poorest area of Northern Italy, as Veneto was until the 1960s.

The Padan Plain in Northern Italy (green) and the Po river basin in the Plain (red circle)

Po Valley

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The Padan Plain in Northern Italy (green) and the Po river basin in the Plain (red circle)
Map showing the river Po and tributaries in the Padan Plain. Note the numerous Italian Lakes on the margin of the Alps.
The regions of Italy as defined by the government of Italy. According to the Po Basin Water Board, the valley includes: 14) Piedmont, 2) Aosta Valley, 11) Lombardy, 20) Veneto, 10) Liguria, 7) Emilia-Romagna, 17) Trentino-Alto Adige, and 8) Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Po near source in the western Alps
Carmagnola, countryside near the river Po
Rice fields in the province of Vercelli, eastern Piedmont.
Landscape of the Bassa: a farm in the province of Cremona, southern Lombardy.
Natural vegetation (central-European broadleaved trees) of the Padan Plain
The Po Valley as seen by the ESA's Sentinel-2.
1585 map depicting the eastern Po Valley and river delta, Vatican Museums.

The Po Valley, Po Plain, Plain of the Po, or Padan Plain (Pianura Padana, or Val Padana) is a major geographical feature of Northern Italy.

The flatlands of Veneto and Friuli are often considered apart since they do not drain into the Po, but they effectively combine into an unbroken plain, making it the largest in Southern Europe.

Verona

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The Roman Ponte Pietra in Verona
Equestrian statue of Cangrande I
The Lion of Saint Mark, located in Piazza delle Erbe, the symbol of the Venetian Republic
The Arche scaligere, tombs of the ancient lords of Verona
Panoramic view of the city from Castel San Pietro
Palazzo Barbieri is Verona City Hall
Palazzo del Governo is the seat of the Province of Verona
The Ponte Scaligero, completed in 1356
Verona Arena
Piazza delle Erbe
Porta Borsari
Piazza dei Signori
San Zeno Basilica, like many other Veronese churches, is built with alternating layers of white stone and bricks
The balcony of Juliet's house
The Portoni della Bra
The Verona Cathedral
The Santa Maria Antica
The Sant'Anastasia
The San Giorgio in Braida
An ATV bus in Verona
Verona Porta Nuova railway station
Verona airport

Verona (, ; Verona or Veròna) is a city on the Adige River in Veneto, Italy, with 258,031 inhabitants.

Kingdom of Italy (Napoleonic)

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Iron Crown of Lombardy
The Kingdom of Italy in 1807, with Istria and Dalmatia, shown in yellow
The Kingdom of Italy in 1811, shown in pink
40 lire coin of the<BR>Regno d'Italia (1808)
5 lire coin of the<BR>Regno d'Italia (1812)
The Kingdom of Italy in 1812, when it was extended from Bolzano to central Adriatic Italy (Marche), losing at the same time Istria and Dalmatia
The murder of finance minister Prina in Milan marked the effective end of the kingdom.
Napoleon I King of Italy 1805–1814
Eugène de Beauharnais Viceroy of Italy 1805–1814
Augusto Caffarelli Minister of War 1806–1810
Achille Fontanelli Minister of War 1811–1813
Ferdinando Marescalchi Minister of Foreign Affairs 1805–1814
Giuseppe Luosi Minister of Justice 1805–1814
Troop uniforms of the Kingdom of Italy, 1805–14
Military parade in 1812

The Kingdom of Italy (1805–1814; Regno d'Italia; Royaume d'Italie) was a kingdom in Northern Italy (formerly the Italian Republic) in personal union with France under Napoleon I.

It covered Savoy and the modern provinces of Lombardy, Veneto, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Trentino, South Tyrol, and Marche.

Kingdom of Italy

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State that existed from 1861—when King Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy—until 1946, when civil discontent led an institutional referendum to abandon the monarchy and form the modern Italian Republic.

State that existed from 1861—when King Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy—until 1946, when civil discontent led an institutional referendum to abandon the monarchy and form the modern Italian Republic.

The Kingdom of Italy in 1936
Map of the Kingdom of Italy at its greatest extent in 1943
The Kingdom of Italy in 1936
Italian unification between 1815 and 1870
Count Camillo Benso of Cavour, the first Prime Minister of the unified Italy
Victor Emmanuel II, the first King of the united Italy
Giuseppe Garibaldi, a major military leader during Italian unification
A factory machinery exposition in Turin, set in 1898, during the period of early industrialization, National Exhibition of Turin, 1898
A 1899 FIAT advertisement
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milano was an architectural work created by Giuseppe Mengoni between 1865 and 1877 and named after the first King of Italy, Victor Emmanuel II.
The Triple Alliance in 1913, shown in red
Original coat of arms
Francesco Crispi promoted the Italian colonialism in Africa in the late 19th century.
The Ain Zara oasis during the Italo-Turkish War: propaganda postcard made by the Italian Army
Italian mounted infantry in China during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900
Italian dirigibles bomb Turkish positions in Libya, as the Italo-Turkish War of 1911–1912 was the first in history in which air attacks (carried out here by dirigible airships) determined the outcome.
Giovanni Giolitti was Prime Minister of Italy five times between 1892 and 1921.
Italy and its colonial possessions at the time of the outbreak of World War I: the area between British Egypt and the firmly held Italian territories is the region of southern Cyrenaica which was under dispute of ownership between Italy and the United Kingdom.
Gabriele D'Annunzio, national poet (vate) of Italy and a prominent nationalist revolutionary who was a supporter of Italy joining action in World War I
Generalissimo Luigi Cadorna (the man to the left of two officers to whom he is speaking) while visiting British batteries during World War I
Italian propaganda poster depicting the Battle of the Piave River
Members of the Arditi corps in 1918. More than 650,000 Italian soldiers lost their lives on the battlefields of World War I.
Armando Diaz, Chief of Staff of the Italian Army since November 1917, halted the Austro-Hungarian advance along the Piave River and launched counter-offensives which led to a decisive victory on the Italian Front. He is celebrated as one of the greatest generals of World War I.
Italian propaganda dropped over Vienna by Gabriele D'Annunzio in 1918
Italian Prime Minister Vittorio Emanuele Orlando (2nd from left) at the World War I peace negotiations in Versailles with David Lloyd George, Georges Clemenceau and Woodrow Wilson (from left)
Residents of Fiume cheering D'Annunzio and his Legionari in September 1919, when Fiume had 22,488 (62% of the population) Italians in a total population of 35,839 inhabitants
Benito Mussolini (second from left) and his Fascist Blackshirts in 1920
Mussolini was initially a highly popular leader in Italy until Italy's military failures in World War II.
Haile Selassie's resistance to the Italian invasion of Ethiopia made him Man of the Year in 1935 by Time.
The Italian Empire (red) before World War II. Pink areas were annexed/occupied for various periods between 1940 and 1943 (the Tientsin concession in China is not shown).
Cruiser Raimondo Montecuccoli
Erwin Rommel meeting Italian General Italo Gariboldi in Tripoli, February 1941
The Italian Army in Russia fought on the Eastern Front.
An Italian AB 41 armored car in Egypt
Territory of the Italian Social Republic and the South Kingdom
Three men executed by public hanging in a street of Rimini, 1944
Rebels celebrating the liberation of Naples, after the Four days of Naples (27–30 September 1943)
Members of the Italian resistance in Ossola, 1944
Umberto II, the last king of Italy
Results of the 1946 referendum
Crown of the Kingdom of Italy

Italy declared war on Austria in alliance with Prussia in 1866 and received the region of Veneto following their victory.

He led the Italian republican drive for unification in Southern Italy, but the Northern Italian monarchy of the House of Savoy in the Kingdom of Sardinia, a state with an important Italian population, whose government was led by Camillo Benso, Count of Cavour, also had ambitions of establishing a united Italian state.

Lega Nord

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Lega Nord (Northern League; abbr.

Lega Nord (Northern League; abbr.

Umberto Bossi at the first rally in Pontida, 1990
Umberto Bossi, 2001
Roberto Maroni, 2010
Roberto Maroni speaks at the federal congress in Milan, 1 July 2012
Matteo Salvini, 2018
Placard for the 2018 electoral campaign, resembling Donald Trump's one in 2016
Statue of Alberto da Giussano, the Medieval knight who inspired Umberto Bossi
Campervan of Lega Nord for the 2005 Tuscan regional election in Florence
The Sun of the Alps, the proposed flag for Padania by Lega Nord
Matteo Salvini speaks in a Lega Nord rally in Turin, 2013
"Festival of the Padanian Peoples" in Venice, 2011
Traditional rally of Lega Nord in Pontida, 2011
Traditional rally of Lega Nord in Pontida, 2013
Official logo (1994–1999)
Official logo (1999–present)

In 1989 the LN was established as a federation of six regional parties from northern and north-central Italy (Liga Veneta, Lega Lombarda, Piemont Autonomista, Uniun Ligure, Lega Emiliano-Romagnola and Alleanza Toscana), which became the party's founding "national" sections in 1991.

At the 1983 general election, Liga Veneta (based in Veneto) elected a deputy, Achille Tramarin; and a senator, Graziano Girardi.

Lombard possessions in Italy: the Lombard Kingdom (Neustria, Austria and Tuscia) and the Lombard Duchies of Spoleto and Benevento

Lombards

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The Lombards or Langobards (Langobardi) were a Germanic people who ruled most of the Italian Peninsula from 568 to 774.

The Lombards or Langobards (Langobardi) were a Germanic people who ruled most of the Italian Peninsula from 568 to 774.

Lombard possessions in Italy: the Lombard Kingdom (Neustria, Austria and Tuscia) and the Lombard Duchies of Spoleto and Benevento
Distribution of Langobardic burial fields at the Lower Elbe Lands (according to W. Wegewitz)
Lombard migration from Scandinavia
Lombard grave goods (6th-7th century), Milan, Lombardy
Plutei of Theodota, mid 8th century, Civic Museums of Pavia.
The Frankish Merovingian King Chlothar II in combat with the Lombards
King Liutprand (712-744) "was a zealous Catholic, generous and a great founder of monasteries"
Lombard Duchy of Benevento in the eighth century
Italy around the turn of the millennium, showing the Lombard states in the south on the eve of the arrival of the Normans.
The West-Germanic languages around the sixth century CE
The runic inscription from the Pforzen buckle may be the earliest written example of Lombardic language
Lombard warrior, bronze statue, 8th century, Pavia Civic Museums.
The Rule of Saint Benedict in Beneventan (i.e. Lombard) script
Church of Santa Sofia, Benevento
Lombard shield boss<BR>northern Italy, 7th century, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Lombard S-shaped fibula
A glass drinking horn from Castel Trosino
Lombard Goldblattkreuz
Lombard fibulae
Altar of Ratchis
8th-century Lombard sculpture depicting female martyrs, based on a Byzantine model. Tempietto Longobardo, Cividale del Friuli
Crypt of Sant'Eusebio, Pavia.

In the summer of 569, the Lombards conquered the main Roman centre of northern Italy, Milan.

He extended his dominions, conquering Liguria in 643 and the remaining part of the Byzantine territories of inner Veneto, including the Roman city of Opitergium (Oderzo).