Northern Ndebele people

NdebeleMatabeleNdebele peopleNorthern NdebeleMatabelesAmandebele peopleMatabele KingdomMatabele peopleMatabele tribeMatebele
The Northern Ndebele people (amaNdebele) are a Bantu nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language.wikipedia
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Northern Ndebele language

NdebeleNorthern NdebeleSindebele
The Northern Ndebele people (amaNdebele) are a Bantu nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language.
Northern Ndebele, also called Ndebele, isiNdebele, Zimbabwean Ndebele or North Ndebele, and formerly known as Matabele, is an African language belonging to the Nguni group of Bantu languages, spoken by the Northern Ndebele people, or Matabele, of Zimbabwe.

Mfecane

difaqaneLifaqanedecimated
During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sesotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", the Mzilikazi regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela.
The movement of people caused many tribes to try to dominate those in new territories, leading to widespread warfare; consolidation of other groups, such as the Matebele, the Mfengu and the Makololo; and the creation of states such as the modern Lesotho.

Great Trek

voortrekkervoortrekkersBoer Trek
The Great trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at Vegkop after which he was exiled into present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local Rozvi, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country.
It was also responsible for the displacement of the Northern Ndebele people, and was one of several decisive factors influencing the decline and collapse of the Zulu Empire.

Centurion, Gauteng

CenturionCenturion StationGauteng
During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sesotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", the Mzilikazi regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela.
From 1825 to 1826 the Matabele peoples defeated the Bakwena tribe and settled along the banks of the Magalies River under the leadership of Mzilikazi.

Matabeleland

Matabele kingdomMatabeleland ProvinceMatebeleland
The Great trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at Vegkop after which he was exiled into present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local Rozvi, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country.
The region is named after its inhabitants, the Ndebele people.

Southern Ndebele people

NdebeleNdebele peopleMatabele
Under his command the disgruntled Zulus went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele.
Although sharing the same name, they should not be confused with (Mzilikazi's) Northern Ndebele people of modern Zimbabwe, an offshoot of Shaka's Zulu people with whom they came into contact only after Mfecane.

Zimbabwe

🇿🇼 RhodesiaZimbabwean
The Great trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at Vegkop after which he was exiled into present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local Rozvi, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country.
Around 1821 the Zulu general Mzilikazi of the Khumalo clan successfully rebelled against King Shaka and established his own clan, the Ndebele.

Nguni people

NguniNguni clansNguni farmers
The Ndwandwes were closely related to the Zulus and spoke the same language, Nguni, using different dialects.
While Ndebele and Xhosa people live in both South Africa and Zimbabwe.

Lobengula

King LobengulaKing Lobengula’sLo Bengula
His son, Lobengula, succeeded him as king.
Inkos'uLobengula Khumalo (1845–1894) was the second and last king of the Northern Ndebele people (historically called Matabele in English).

Bulawayo

kwaBulawayoAscot PiazzaBulawayan
Mzilikazi organised this ethnically diverse nation into a militaristic system of regimental towns and established his capital at Bulawayo. Hoping for a quick victory, Leander Starr Jameson sent his British forces to attack the capital KwaBulawayo and capture Lobengula.
It is the capital of the Ndebele province of Matabeleland.

Southern Africa

SouthernSouth Africasouthern African
The Northern Ndebele people (amaNdebele) are a Bantu nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language.
Due to the Bantu expansion which edged the previous native African peoples to the more remote areas of the region, the majority of African ethnic groups in this region, including the Xhosa, Zulu, Tsonga, Swazi, Northern Ndebele, Southern Ndebele, Tswana, Sotho, and Shona people, BaLunda, Mbundu, Ovimbundu, Shona, Chaga and Sukuma, speak Bantu languages.

Shangani Patrol

34 troopersambushed and annihilatedBattle of Shangani
The most famous of these patrols, the Shangani Patrol, managed to find Lobengula, only to be trapped and wiped out in battle.
The Shangani Patrol (or Wilson's Patrol) was a 34-soldier unit of the British South Africa Company that in 1893 was ambushed and annihilated by more than 3,000 Matabele warriors in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), during the First Matabele War.

Rudd Concession

concessionconcession for mining rightsmining rights
Rhodes negotiated a territorial treaty with Lobengula, known as the Rudd Concession of 1888, which permitted British mining and colonisation of Matabele lands between the Limpopo and Zambezi rivers, and prohibited all Boer settlement in the region.
He laid the groundwork for concession negotiations during early 1888 by arranging a treaty of friendship between the British and Matabele peoples and then sent Rudd's team from South Africa to obtain the rights.

Matshobana KaMangete

Mashobane
To please the Ndwandwe tribe, the Khumalo chief Mashobane married the daughter of the Ndwandwe chief Zwide and sired a son, Mzilikazi.
Mashobane, son of chief Mangethe (Zikode), was the chief of the Khumalo tribe: a clan of Nguni people living near the Black Umfolozi river in kwaZulu, in South Africa, and was the father of Mzilikazi the founder of the Ndebele (Matabele) kingdom in Zimbabwe.

Bantu peoples

BantuBantusBantu people
The Northern Ndebele people (amaNdebele) are a Bantu nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language.

Mthwakazi

Ndebelesecessionist
In March 1896 the Matabele revolted against the authority of the British South Africa Company, in what is now celebrated in Mthwakazi as the First War of Independence.
Mthwakazi is the traditional name of the proto-Ndebele and Ndebele kingdom that existed until the end of the 19th century within the area of today's Zimbabwe.

Khumalo clan

KhumaloKhumalo Kingdom
The Khumalos were caught between the Ndwandwe led by Zwide and the Zulus led by Shaka.
Their most famous issue was Mzilikazi, an influential figure in the mfecane, and founder of the Northern Ndebele nation.

Matobo National Park

MatoposMatopos HillsMatobo Hills
An estimated 50,000 Matabele retreated into their stronghold of the Matobo Hills near KwaBulawayo which became the scene of the fiercest fighting against the white settler patrols, led by legendary military figures such as Frederick Russell Burnham, Robert Baden-Powell, and Frederick Selous.
Mzilikazi, founder of the Ndebele nation, gave the area its name, meaning 'Bald Heads'.

Joshua Nkomo

Joshua Mqabuko NkomoNkomo
The Zimbabwe People's Revolutionary Army (ZIPRA) was a primarily Ndebele anti-government force, led by Joshua Nkomo, and the ZAPU political organization. The Gukurahundi ("the early rain which washes away the chaff before the spring rains" ) refers to the suppression by Zimbabwe's 5th Brigade in the predominantly Ndebele speaking region of Matabeleland, who most of whom were supporters of Joshua Nkomo and ZAPU.
He was leader and founder of the Zimbabwe African People's Union (ZAPU) party, and a member of the Ndebele people.

Cecil Rhodes

RhodesCecil John RhodesCecil
In exchange for wealth and arms, Lobengula granted several concessions to the British, the most prominent of which is the 1888 Rudd concession giving Cecil Rhodes exclusive mineral rights in much of the lands east of his main territory.
Rhodes had already tried and failed to get a mining concession from Lobengula, king of the Ndebele of Matabeleland.

Leander Starr Jameson

JamesonSir Leander Starr JamesonDr. Jameson
Hoping for a quick victory, Leander Starr Jameson sent his British forces to attack the capital KwaBulawayo and capture Lobengula.
There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes.

Gukurahundi

a massacre in the 1980sdeaths of more than 20,000 Zimbabweansgenocide of Ndebele civilians
The Gukurahundi ("the early rain which washes away the chaff before the spring rains" ) refers to the suppression by Zimbabwe's 5th Brigade in the predominantly Ndebele speaking region of Matabeleland, who most of whom were supporters of Joshua Nkomo and ZAPU.
The Gukurahundi was a series of massacres of Ndebele civilians carried out by the Zimbabwe National Army from early 1983 to late 1987.

Mzilikazi

King MzilikaziMoselekatse
Their history began when a Zulu chiefdom split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally.

Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell

Robert Baden-PowellBaden-PowellLord Baden-Powell
An estimated 50,000 Matabele retreated into their stronghold of the Matobo Hills near KwaBulawayo which became the scene of the fiercest fighting against the white settler patrols, led by legendary military figures such as Frederick Russell Burnham, Robert Baden-Powell, and Frederick Selous.
Baden-Powell was accused of illegally executing a prisoner of war in 1896, the Matabele chief Uwini, who had been promised his life would be spared if he surrendered.

Frederick Russell Burnham

Frederick R. BurnhamBurnhamFrederick Burnham
An estimated 50,000 Matabele retreated into their stronghold of the Matobo Hills near KwaBulawayo which became the scene of the fiercest fighting against the white settler patrols, led by legendary military figures such as Frederick Russell Burnham, Robert Baden-Powell, and Frederick Selous.
Burnham was trekking the 1,000 miles (1,609 km) north from Durban to Matabeleland with his wife and son, an American buckboard and six donkeys when war broke out between Rhodes's British South Africa Company and the Matabele (or Ndebele) King Lobengula in late 1893.