Northrop F-20 Tigershark

F-20 TigersharkF-20^F-20 designationF-20ANorthrop's F-20 "Tigershark" fighterYF-20 Tigershark
The Northrop F-20 Tigershark (initially F-5G) was a light fighter, designed and built by Northrop.wikipedia
129 Related Articles

Northrop F-5

F-5F-5 Freedom FighterF-5E
Its development began in 1975 as a further evolution of Northrop's F-5E Tiger II, featuring a new engine that greatly improved overall performance, and a modern avionics suite including a powerful and flexible radar.
The Northrop F-20 Tigershark was an advanced variant to succeed the F-5E which was ultimately canceled when export customers did not emerge.

Northrop Corporation

NorthropNorthrop AircraftNorthrop Aircraft Corporation
The Northrop F-20 Tigershark (initially F-5G) was a light fighter, designed and built by Northrop.
Northrop continued to build much of the F-18 fuselage and other systems after this period, but also returned to the original F-5 design with yet another new engine to produce the F-20 Tigershark as a low-cost aircraft.

AIDC F-CK-1 Ching-kuo

AIDC Ching-KuoIndigenous Defense FighterAIDC F-CK Indigenous Defence Fighter
By this point the Taiwanese had started their own light fighter project, the AIDC F-CK-1 Ching-kuo.
Taiwan initiated the IDF program when the United States refused to sell F-20 Tigershark and F-16 Fighting Falcon jet fighters following diplomatic pressure from China.

Light fighter

lightweight fighterlightweightjet-powered light-fighter
The Northrop F-20 Tigershark (initially F-5G) was a light fighter, designed and built by Northrop.
In the 1980s the privately developed F-5G, later renamed the Northrop F-20 Tigershark, aimed to correct weaknesses in the aging F-5 while maintaining small size and low cost.

AN/APG-67

General Electric AN/APG-67
The General Electric AN/APG-67 multi-mode radar was the heart of the sensor suite, offering a wide range of air-to-air and air-to-ground modes.
The AN/APG-67 is a multi-mode all-digital X band coherent pulse doppler radar originally developed by General Electric for the Northrop F-20 Tigershark program of the early 1980s.

Darrell Cornell

On 10 October 1984, GG1001 crashed in South Korea on a demonstration flight, killing Northrop pilot Darrell Cornell.
The F-20, 82-0062, c/n GG1001, N4416T, he was piloting stalled after a series of climbing rolls performed with flaps and gear extended.

Saab JAS 39 Gripen

JAS 39 GripenGripenSaab Gripen
Sweden decided to develop their own design, the JAS 39 Gripen.
Several foreign designs were also studied, including the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon, the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet, the Northrop F-20 Tigershark and the Dassault Mirage 2000.

General Electric F404

F404GE F404F-404
The primary design change between the earlier F-5E and the F-20 was the use of a single General Electric F404 engine, which was originally designed for the F/A-18 Hornet.

GAU-13

GAU-13/A30mm GPU-5 gun pod
82 bombs, and fired rounds from a 30 mm (1.18 in) gun pod (GPU-5/A, four-barrel GAU-13/A) in addition to the two internal 20 mm (.79 in) M39 cannon.
The GPU-5 is no longer in U.S. service, although some Thai F-5E Tiger II aircraft still carry the weapon; it was also tested on the F-20 Tigershark.

Thomas V. Jones

Thomas Victor Jones
Thomas V. Jones, Northrop's CEO, argued that there was little point independently developing aircraft if companies were reliant on the government to sell them.
He retired as chief executive of Northrop in 1989 after being reprimanded by the board of directors for his role in a bribery scandal surrounding the marketing the F-20 fighter to South Korea.

Suwon Air Base

Suwon AB (K-13)Suwon AirfieldSuwon
On 10 October 1984, a corporately-owned Northrop F-20 Tigershark, AF Ser.

Radar

radar stationradarsradar system
Its development began in 1975 as a further evolution of Northrop's F-5E Tiger II, featuring a new engine that greatly improved overall performance, and a modern avionics suite including a powerful and flexible radar.

Beyond-visual-range missile

beyond visual rangebeyond-visual-rangeBVR
Compared with the F-5E, the F-20 was much faster, gained beyond-visual-range air-to-air capability, and had a full suite of air-to-ground modes capable of firing most U.S. weapons.

General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon

F-16F-16 Fighting FalconF-16C Fighting Falcon
With these improved capabilities, the F-20 became competitive with contemporary fighter designs such as the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon, but was much less expensive to purchase and operate. Northrop had high hopes for the F-20 in the international market, but policy changes following Ronald Reagan's election meant the F-20 had to compete for sales against aircraft like the F-16, the USAF's latest fighter design.

United States Department of Defense

Department of DefenseU.S. Department of DefenseUS Department of Defense
Much of the F-20's development was carried out under a US Department of Defense (DoD) project called "FX".

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
FX sought to develop fighters that would be capable in combat with the latest Soviet aircraft, but excluding sensitive front-line technologies used by the United States Air Force's own aircraft.

United States Air Force

U.S. Air ForceAir ForceUSAF
FX sought to develop fighters that would be capable in combat with the latest Soviet aircraft, but excluding sensitive front-line technologies used by the United States Air Force's own aircraft. On 23 April 1962, the United States Air Force (USAF) informed the United States Secretary of Defense that the N-156F had been selected, under the designation F-5 and given the name "Freedom Fighter."

Jimmy Carter

CarterPresident CarterPresident Jimmy Carter
FX was a product of the Carter administration's military export policies, which aimed to provide foreign nations with high quality equipment without the risk of US front-line technology falling into Soviet hands.

Ronald Reagan

ReaganRonald W. ReaganPresident Reagan
Northrop had high hopes for the F-20 in the international market, but policy changes following Ronald Reagan's election meant the F-20 had to compete for sales against aircraft like the F-16, the USAF's latest fighter design.

John F. Kennedy

KennedyPresident KennedyJohn Kennedy
When John F. Kennedy entered office in 1961, the U.S. Department of Defense was instructed to find an inexpensive fighter aircraft that the United States could offer to its allies through the Mutual Defense Assistance Act.

Mutual Defense Assistance Act

Military Assistance ProgramMutual Defense Assistance ProgramMutual Defense Assistance Pact
When John F. Kennedy entered office in 1961, the U.S. Department of Defense was instructed to find an inexpensive fighter aircraft that the United States could offer to its allies through the Mutual Defense Assistance Act.

Lockheed F-104 Starfighter

F-104 StarfighterF-104Lockheed F-104G Starfighter
A number of designs were studied, including stripped-down versions of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter and Vought F-8 Crusader, and the newly designed Northrop N-156F.

Vought F-8 Crusader

F-8 CrusaderRF-8G CrusaderF8U Crusader
A number of designs were studied, including stripped-down versions of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter and Vought F-8 Crusader, and the newly designed Northrop N-156F.

United States Secretary of Defense

Secretary of DefenseU.S. Secretary of DefenseDefense Secretary
On 23 April 1962, the United States Air Force (USAF) informed the United States Secretary of Defense that the N-156F had been selected, under the designation F-5 and given the name "Freedom Fighter."