Northwest Kidney Centers

Northwest Kidney Center
Northwest Kidney Centers is a regional, not-for-profit community-based provider of kidney dialysis, public health education, and research into the causes and treatments of chronic kidney disease.wikipedia
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James W. Haviland

HavilandJames Haviland
Scribner turned to the King County Medical Society president, James W. Haviland, for sponsorship of a community-supported outpatient dialysis center.
James W. Haviland MD (July 18, 1911 – November 14, 2007) was an American doctor and specialist in Internal Medicine co-founder of the University of Washington School of Medicine and co-founder of the Northwest Kidney Centers.

Hemodialysis

haemodialysisdialysisScribner shunt
This changed when Dr. Belding H. Scribner of the University of Washington developed the Scribner shunt, a blood access device which made long-term dialysis possible for the first time.
In 1962, Scribner started the world's first outpatient dialysis facility, the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center, later renamed the Northwest Kidney Centers.

Joseph W. Eschbach

In the 1980s, Northwest Kidney Centers was the first site chosen for human studies on a synthetic form of erythropoietin (EPO), genetically engineered and later marketed as Epogen by Amgen, Inc. Dr. Joseph W. Eschbach led the trials at Northwest Kidney Centers.
In the 1980s, Dr. Eschbach helped lead a clinical trial at the Northwest Kidney Centers studying whether an artificial erythropoietin hormone, Epogen, manufactured by Amgen, could replace or supplement the naturally occurring hormone.

Home hemodialysis

homehome nocturnal hemodialysisnocturnal hemodialysis
In 1964, Scribner and his team developed a machine to provide home hemodialysis for the first time.
The Seattle group (originally the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center, later the Northwest Kidney Centers) started their home program in July 1964.

Belding Hibbard Scribner

Belding H. ScribnerBelding ScribnerDr. Belding H. Scribner
This changed when Dr. Belding H. Scribner of the University of Washington developed the Scribner shunt, a blood access device which made long-term dialysis possible for the first time.
Eventually renamed Northwest Kidney Centers, it was the world's first outpatient dialysis treatment center.

Chronic kidney disease

chronic renal failureend-stage renal diseasechronic kidney failure
Northwest Kidney Centers is a regional, not-for-profit community-based provider of kidney dialysis, public health education, and research into the causes and treatments of chronic kidney disease.

Dialysis

kidney dialysisrenal dialysisdialysis machine
Established in Seattle in 1962, it was the world's first out-of-hospital dialysis provider.

Everett, Washington

EverettEverett, WACity of Everett
It plans to open its first clinic in Everett in 2020.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
According to a United States Renal Data System 2013 report, there are 6,009 outpatient dialysis clinics in the United States.

Kidney failure

renal failurekidney problemsrenal impairment
In 1960, kidney failure was fatal.

University of Washington

WashingtonUniversity of Washington, SeattleUniversity of Washington in Seattle
This changed when Dr. Belding H. Scribner of the University of Washington developed the Scribner shunt, a blood access device which made long-term dialysis possible for the first time.

Time (magazine)

TimeTime MagazineTime'' magazine
In 1964, Time magazine reported that to treat 11 patients, the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center had a staff of two full-time physicians and one half-time physician, plus five nurses and five technicians.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
In 1972, the U.S. Congress passed legislation authorizing the end-stage renal disease program of Medicare.

End Stage Renal Disease Program

end stage renal diseaseend-stage ESRD patientsend-stage renal disease program
In 1972, the U.S. Congress passed legislation authorizing the end-stage renal disease program of Medicare.

Medicare (United States)

MedicareMedicare (US)Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act
In 1972, the U.S. Congress passed legislation authorizing the end-stage renal disease program of Medicare.

Kidney transplantation

kidney transplantrenal transplantationrenal transplant
Section 299I of Public Law 92-603, on October 30, 1972, extended Medicare coverage to over 90 percent of Americans if they had permanent kidney failure and therefore required dialysis or kidney transplantation to live.

Bloodworks Northwest

Puget Sound Blood Center
Together with the Puget Sound Blood Center and the University of Washington Department of Orthopedics, Northwest Kidney Center jointly founded the Northwest Tissue Center in 1988.

Federal Way, Washington

Federal WayFederal Way, WAWashington (Federal Way)
Northwest Kidney Centers opened three new dialysis clinics in 2018, two in Federal Way and one in Fife, Washington.

Fife, Washington

Fife
Northwest Kidney Centers opened three new dialysis clinics in 2018, two in Federal Way and one in Fife, Washington.

University of Washington School of Medicine

UW MedicineSchool of MedicineUniversity of Washington
In 2008, Northwest Kidney Centers collaborated with UW Medicine in the creation of the Kidney Research Institute.

National Institutes of Health

NIHNational Institute of HealthNational Institutes of Health (NIH)
The Kidney Research Institute has received more than $100 million in research funding, primarily from the National Institutes of Health, and published more than 1,000 scientific papers.

Erythropoietin

EPOrecombinant EPOerythropoetin
In the 1980s, Northwest Kidney Centers was the first site chosen for human studies on a synthetic form of erythropoietin (EPO), genetically engineered and later marketed as Epogen by Amgen, Inc. Dr. Joseph W. Eschbach led the trials at Northwest Kidney Centers.

Epoetin alfa

EpogenProcritRecormon
In the 1980s, Northwest Kidney Centers was the first site chosen for human studies on a synthetic form of erythropoietin (EPO), genetically engineered and later marketed as Epogen by Amgen, Inc. Dr. Joseph W. Eschbach led the trials at Northwest Kidney Centers.

Amgen

ImmunexAmgen Inc.Abgenix
In the 1980s, Northwest Kidney Centers was the first site chosen for human studies on a synthetic form of erythropoietin (EPO), genetically engineered and later marketed as Epogen by Amgen, Inc. Dr. Joseph W. Eschbach led the trials at Northwest Kidney Centers.

The New England Journal of Medicine

New England Journal of MedicineNEJMBoston Medical and Surgical Journal
His results, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 1987, showed that artificial EPO reversed anemia in kidney patients.