Nouméa Accord

Accord de NouméaindependenceNoumea Accord
The Nouméa Accord of 1998 is a promise by the French Republic to grant political power to New Caledonia and its original population, the Kanaks, until the territory decided whether to remain a special collectivity of France or become an independent state in a referendum held in 2018.wikipedia
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2018 New Caledonian independence referendum

independence referendum2018first
The Nouméa Accord of 1998 is a promise by the French Republic to grant political power to New Caledonia and its original population, the Kanaks, until the territory decided whether to remain a special collectivity of France or become an independent state in a referendum held in 2018.
Recent inhabitants who are registered to vote in general elections were ineligible to vote in the referendum, as agreed in the 1998 Nouméa Accord, representing 17% of the total of 210,105 registered voters of New Caledonia.

Overseas France

overseas departments and territories of FranceFrench overseas territoriesoverseas departments and territories
The Nouméa Accord of 1998 is a promise by the French Republic to grant political power to New Caledonia and its original population, the Kanaks, until the territory decided whether to remain a special collectivity of France or become an independent state in a referendum held in 2018.
(New Caledonia is neither an overseas region nor an overseas collectivity; it has a sui generis status, in keeping with the Nouméa Accord.)

1998 New Caledonian Nouméa Accord referendum

a referendum1998 referendumNouméa Accord referendum
It was signed 5 May 1998 by Lionel Jospin, and approved in a referendum in New Caledonia on 8 November, with 72% voting in favour.
A referendum on the Nouméa Accord was held in New Caledonia on 8 November 1998.

President of the Government of New Caledonia

PresidentPresident of the GovernmentGovernment President
Under the conditions of the Accord, which also gave additional autonomy to the island, the Vice President of New Caledonia must be a pro-independence politician if the Presidency is held by an anti-independence politician.
This article lists the Presidents of the Government of New Caledonia since 1999, after the Nouméa Accord was signed in 1998.

Vice President of the Government of New Caledonia

Vice President
Under the conditions of the Accord, which also gave additional autonomy to the island, the Vice President of New Caledonia must be a pro-independence politician if the Presidency is held by an anti-independence politician.
According to the Nouméa Accord, Vice President in the collegial government system needs to come from a pro-independence party if the President comes from an anti-independence party.

Matignon Agreements (1988)

Matignon AccordsMatignon AgreementsAccords de Matignon
Named after New Caledonia's capital and largest city, the Nouméa Accord was the second accord following the Matignon Agreements (1988).
On 5 May 1998 the Nouméa Accord was signed under the aegis of Lionel Jospin.

New Caledonia

New-CaledoniaNouvelle-CalédonieNCL
The Nouméa Accord of 1998 is a promise by the French Republic to grant political power to New Caledonia and its original population, the Kanaks, until the territory decided whether to remain a special collectivity of France or become an independent state in a referendum held in 2018.
New Caledonia (Nouvelle-Calédonie) is a special collectivity of France, currently governed under the Nouméa Accord, located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, to the south of Vanuatu, about 1,210 km east of Australia and from Metropolitan France.

Jacques Lafleur

Jacques
He was a signatory to the Matignon Accords in 1988 and the Nouméa Accord in 1998.

Caledonian Union

UC
However, the UC has taken a radical stance in favour of strict adherence to the terms of the Nouméa Accord, no talks with the loyalists.

Kanak people

KanakKanaksKanaka
The Nouméa Accord of 1998 is a promise by the French Republic to grant political power to New Caledonia and its original population, the Kanaks, until the territory decided whether to remain a special collectivity of France or become an independent state in a referendum held in 2018.
A subsequent agreement, the "Nouméa Accord", was signed between the FLNKS President and the French Government on 5 May 1998, allowing for a degree of autonomy to New Caledonia over a transition period of up to 20 years.

Military

armed forcesdefensedefence
France would continue to control military and foreign policy, immigration, police and currency until that time, and afterwards if the population chose to remain French.

Foreign policy

foreign affairsforeignforeign relations
France would continue to control military and foreign policy, immigration, police and currency until that time, and afterwards if the population chose to remain French.

Immigration

immigrantimmigrantsimmigrated
France would continue to control military and foreign policy, immigration, police and currency until that time, and afterwards if the population chose to remain French.

Police

policingpolice forcepolice department
France would continue to control military and foreign policy, immigration, police and currency until that time, and afterwards if the population chose to remain French.

Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
France would continue to control military and foreign policy, immigration, police and currency until that time, and afterwards if the population chose to remain French.

Nouméa

NoumeaNouméa, New CaledoniaNoumea, New Caledonia
Named after New Caledonia's capital and largest city, the Nouméa Accord was the second accord following the Matignon Agreements (1988).

Lionel Jospin

JospinJospin CabinetLionel Jospin cabinet
It was signed 5 May 1998 by Lionel Jospin, and approved in a referendum in New Caledonia on 8 November, with 72% voting in favour.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The Nouméa Accord of 1998 is a promise by the French Republic to grant political power to New Caledonia and its original population, the Kanaks, until the territory decided whether to remain a special collectivity of France or become an independent state in a referendum held in 2018.

The Rally (New Caledonia)

Rally for Caledonia in the RepublicThe Rally–UMPThe Rally-UMP