Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission

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The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) was established in Nova Scotia, Canada in 1967 to administer the Nova Scotia Human Rights Act.wikipedia
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Black Nova Scotians

Black Nova ScotianAfrican Nova ScotianBlack
Originally the mandate of the Commission was primarily to address the plight of Black Nova Scotians.
In the 20th century, Black Nova Scotians organized for civil rights, establishing such groups as the Nova Scotia Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, the Black United Front, and the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia.

Robert Stanfield

Robert L. StanfieldRobert Lorne StanfieldRobert
In the early sixties direct involvement of premier Robert Stanfield along with William Pearly Oliver were instrumental in laying the foundation in Nova Scotia for the establishment of the Commission.
He led reforms in human rights, education, municipal government and health care and also created Industrial Estates Limited, a crown corporation that successfully attracted investment from world companies such as Michelin Tire.

Gordon Earle

Gordon S. Earle
The first employee of the Commission was Gordon Earle.
Earle was a senior public servant, he was the first employee of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission.

William Pearly Oliver

In the early sixties direct involvement of premier Robert Stanfield along with William Pearly Oliver were instrumental in laying the foundation in Nova Scotia for the establishment of the Commission.
William Pearly Oliver (February 11, 1912 in Wolfville, Nova Scotia – Lucasville in May 26, 1989) worked at the Cornwallis Street Baptist Church for twenty-five years (1937–1962) and was instrumental in developing the four leading organizations to support Black Nova Scotians in the 20th century: Nova Scotia Association for the Advancement of Colored People (1945), the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (1967), the Black United Front (1969) and the Black Cultural Centre (1983).

Daniel N. Paul

Daniel PaulDr. Daniel Paul
Some prominent Commissioners in the past have included Wanda Thomas Bernard, Daniel N. Paul, Sister Dorothy Moore and Calvin Ruck.
He has also served on Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, and on the Nova Scotia Department of Justice's Court Restructuring Task Force, among other provincial commissions, as a Justice of the Peace for the Province and has been a member of the Nova Scotia Police Review Board for over 20 years.

Mayann Francis

Mayann E. Francis
Former CEO's of the Commission have included: Marvin Schiff (1968–1971); Dr. George McCurdy (1971–1983); Cathy MacNutt (1984-1985); Dr. Anthony Johnstone (1985–1989); Dr. Bridglal Pachai (1989–1994); Wayne MacKay (1995–1998); Mayann Francis (former Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia) (1999–2006); Michael Noonan (Acting)(2006–2008); Krista Daley (2008–2011); Karen Fitzner (Acting) (2011); David Shannon (2011-2013); Tracey Williams (2014-2015)
She was the director and CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission from 1999-2006.

Bridglal Pachai

Former CEO's of the Commission have included: Marvin Schiff (1968–1971); Dr. George McCurdy (1971–1983); Cathy MacNutt (1984-1985); Dr. Anthony Johnstone (1985–1989); Dr. Bridglal Pachai (1989–1994); Wayne MacKay (1995–1998); Mayann Francis (former Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia) (1999–2006); Michael Noonan (Acting)(2006–2008); Krista Daley (2008–2011); Karen Fitzner (Acting) (2011); David Shannon (2011-2013); Tracey Williams (2014-2015)
Having returned permanently to Nova Scotia in 1985, he became the executive director of the Black Cultural Centre (1985 to 1989) and, subsequently, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (1989 to 1994).

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) was established in Nova Scotia, Canada in 1967 to administer the Nova Scotia Human Rights Act.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) was established in Nova Scotia, Canada in 1967 to administer the Nova Scotia Human Rights Act.

Restorative justice

restorativerestorationcorrective justice
The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission is the first commission in Canada to engage a restorative dispute resolution process.

Discrimination

discriminatoryanti-discriminationdiscriminate
The Commission's mandate under the Act includes: helping people prevent discrimination through public education and public policy, and effecting resolution in situations where a complaint of discriminatory behaviour has been initiated.

State school

Publicpublic high schoolpublic school
The Commission's mandate under the Act includes: helping people prevent discrimination through public education and public policy, and effecting resolution in situations where a complaint of discriminatory behaviour has been initiated.

Public policy

public affairspublic policiespolicy
The Commission's mandate under the Act includes: helping people prevent discrimination through public education and public policy, and effecting resolution in situations where a complaint of discriminatory behaviour has been initiated.

Viola Desmond

Viola Desmond Pardon
The following year, 1946, the Viola Desmond case galvanized the civil rights movement in Nova Scotia.

Donald Oliver

Donald H. Oliver
Others who supported the early development of the Human Rights Commission were Donald Oliver, Gus Wedderburn, Carrie Best and Buddy Daye. Some of the recipients were: the late Pat Skinner (2006), Percy Paris (2005), Senator Donald Oliver (2006), Dr. Hetty Van Gurp (2006), Just Us!

Carrie Best

Carrie M. Best
Others who supported the early development of the Human Rights Commission were Donald Oliver, Gus Wedderburn, Carrie Best and Buddy Daye.

Buddy Daye

Others who supported the early development of the Human Rights Commission were Donald Oliver, Gus Wedderburn, Carrie Best and Buddy Daye.

Black United Front

Black United Front of Nova ScotiaBlack United Front Cairo
The Commission quickly introduced wide-ranging legislation amendments to the Human Rights Act, “making the Nova Scotia legislation the strongest and most comprehensive of its kind in Canada.” The Commission provided funds for William Oliver's newest organization, the Black United Front and sponsored a two-day workshop with activist Saul Alinsky.

Saul Alinsky

Saul D. AlinskyAlinskyAlinsky, Saul D.
The Commission quickly introduced wide-ranging legislation amendments to the Human Rights Act, “making the Nova Scotia legislation the strongest and most comprehensive of its kind in Canada.” The Commission provided funds for William Oliver's newest organization, the Black United Front and sponsored a two-day workshop with activist Saul Alinsky.

Wanda Thomas Bernard

Some prominent Commissioners in the past have included Wanda Thomas Bernard, Daniel N. Paul, Sister Dorothy Moore and Calvin Ruck.

Calvin Ruck

Calvin W. Ruck
Some prominent Commissioners in the past have included Wanda Thomas Bernard, Daniel N. Paul, Sister Dorothy Moore and Calvin Ruck.

Human Rights Day

International Human Rights DayAmnesty International Concert for Human RightsHuman Rights Week
To mark International Human Rights Day each year, the Commission awards a Human Rights Award on December 10 to an individual and an organization to recognize the work of Nova Scotians in promoting and protecting human rights.

Percy Paris

Paris
Some of the recipients were: the late Pat Skinner (2006), Percy Paris (2005), Senator Donald Oliver (2006), Dr. Hetty Van Gurp (2006), Just Us!

Amnesty International

AmnestyAmnesty International UKAmnesty International Norway
Coffee Roasters Co-op's Jeff and Deborah Moore (2005), M. Lee Cohen (2002), Henderson Paris (1999), and Amnesty International(1994).

Mediation

mediatormediatorsPeer Mediation
With this change, the Commission moves away from the traditional investigation with optional mediation.