Novel

novelsmodern novelthe novelliterary novelhistoriesnovelistromance19th century novelancient novelbook
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book.wikipedia
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Fiction

fictionalrealistic fictionfictitious
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book.
It can also refer, more narrowly, to narratives written only in prose (the novel and short story), and is often used as a synonym for the novel.

Short story

short storiesshort story writershort fiction
(Since the 18th century, the term "novella", or "novelle" in German, has been used in English and other European languages to describe a long short story or a short novel.)
Short stories make use of plot, resonance, and other dynamic components as in a novel, but typically to a lesser degree.

Don Quixote

Don Quixote de la ManchaDon QuijoteQuixote
Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote (the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era.
The Ingenious Nobleman Sir Quixote of La Mancha (Modern Spanish: El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, ), or just Don Quixote, is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes.

Novelist

writer of novelsnovelistsnovel writer
Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote (the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era.
A novelist is an author or writer of novels, though often novelists also write in other genres of both fiction and non-fiction.

Narrative

storystoriesnarratives
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book.
Narrative can be organized in a number of thematic or formal categories: non-fiction (such as definitively including creative non-fiction, biography, journalism, transcript poetry, and historiography); fictionalization of historical events (such as anecdote, myth, legend, and historical fiction); and fiction proper (such as literature in prose and sometimes poetry, such as short stories, novels, and narrative poems and songs, and imaginary narratives as portrayed in other textual forms, games, or live or recorded performances).

Classic Chinese Novels

Four Great Classical NovelsclassicGreat Classical Novel
Spread of printed books in China led to the appearance of classical Chinese novels by the Ming dynasty (1368–1644).
In sinology, the Classic Chinese Novels are two sets of the four or six best-known traditional Chinese novels.

Vikram Seth

Seth, Vikram
Vikram Seth's The Golden Gate (1986), composed of 590 Onegin stanzas, is a more recent example of the verse novel.
He has written several novels and poetry books.

The Golden Ass

MetamorphosesGolden AssMetamorphoses (The Golden Ass)
Early works of extended fictional prose, or novels, include works in Latin like the Satyricon by Petronius (c. 50 AD), and The Golden Ass by Apuleius (c. 150 AD), works in Ancient Greek such as Daphnis and Chloe by Longus (c. late second century AD), works in Sanskrit such as the 6th– or 7th-century Daśakumāracarita by Daṇḍin, and in the 7th-century Kadambari by Banabhatta, Murasaki Shikibu's 11th-century Japanese work The Tale of Genji, the 12th-century Hayy ibn Yaqdhan (or Philosophus Autodidactus, the 17th-century Latin title) by Ibn Tufail, who wrote in Arabic, the 13th-century Theologus Autodidactus by Ibn al-Nafis, another Arabic novelist, and Blanquerna, written in Catalan by Ramon Llull (1283), and the 14th-century Chinese Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong. Classical Greek and Roman prose narratives included a didactic strand, with the philosopher Plato's (c. 425 – c. 348 BC) dialogues; a satirical dimension with Petronius' Satyricon; the incredible stories of Lucian of Samosata; and Lucius Apuleius' proto-picaresque The Golden Ass, as well as the heroic romances of the Greeks Heliodorus and Longus.
The Metamorphoses of Apuleius, which Augustine of Hippo referred to as The Golden Ass (Asinus aureus), is the only ancient Roman novel in Latin to survive in its entirety.

Chivalric romance

romanceromancesromantic
The entire genre has been seen as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years", with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the Italian renaissance novella.
Unlike the later form of the novel and like the chansons de geste, the genre of romance dealt with traditional themes.

Satyricon

The SatyriconTrimalchio's dinner partyCena Trimalchionis
Early works of extended fictional prose, or novels, include works in Latin like the Satyricon by Petronius (c. 50 AD), and The Golden Ass by Apuleius (c. 150 AD), works in Ancient Greek such as Daphnis and Chloe by Longus (c. late second century AD), works in Sanskrit such as the 6th– or 7th-century Daśakumāracarita by Daṇḍin, and in the 7th-century Kadambari by Banabhatta, Murasaki Shikibu's 11th-century Japanese work The Tale of Genji, the 12th-century Hayy ibn Yaqdhan (or Philosophus Autodidactus, the 17th-century Latin title) by Ibn Tufail, who wrote in Arabic, the 13th-century Theologus Autodidactus by Ibn al-Nafis, another Arabic novelist, and Blanquerna, written in Catalan by Ramon Llull (1283), and the 14th-century Chinese Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong. Classical Greek and Roman prose narratives included a didactic strand, with the philosopher Plato's (c. 425 – c. 348 BC) dialogues; a satirical dimension with Petronius' Satyricon; the incredible stories of Lucian of Samosata; and Lucius Apuleius' proto-picaresque The Golden Ass, as well as the heroic romances of the Greeks Heliodorus and Longus.
As with the Metamorphoses (also called The Golden Ass) of Apuleius, classical scholars often describe it as a "Roman novel", without necessarily implying continuity with the modern literary form.

Robinson Crusoe

RobinsonnovelCrusoe
Hayy ibn Yaqdhan, with its story of a human outcast surviving on an island, is also likely to have influenced Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719), because the work was available in an English edition in 1711.
With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver'd by Pyrates, commonly known as Robinson Crusoe,' is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

Eugene Onegin

Oneginnovel of the same nameAct III pas de deux from Onegin
While prose rather than verse became the standard of the modern novel, the ancestors of the modern European novel include verse epics in the Romance language of southern France, especially those by Chrétien de Troyes (late 12th century), and in Middle English (Geoffrey Chaucer's (c. 1343 – 1400) The Canterbury Tales). Even in the 19th century, fictional narratives in verse, such as Lord Byron's Don Juan (1824), Alexander Pushkin's Yevgeniy Onegin (1833), and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh (1856), competed with prose novels.
As with many other 19th century novels, Onegin was written and published serially, with parts of each chapter often appearing in magazines before the first printing of each chapter.

La Princesse de Clèves

novel of the same namePrincess of Clevessame name
Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji (1010) has been described as the world's first novel and shows essentially all the qualities for which Marie de La Fayette's novel La Princesse de Clèves (1678) has been praised: individuality of perception, an interest in character development, and psychological observation.
La Princesse de Clèves is a French novel which was published anonymously in March 1678.

Blanquerna

Early works of extended fictional prose, or novels, include works in Latin like the Satyricon by Petronius (c. 50 AD), and The Golden Ass by Apuleius (c. 150 AD), works in Ancient Greek such as Daphnis and Chloe by Longus (c. late second century AD), works in Sanskrit such as the 6th– or 7th-century Daśakumāracarita by Daṇḍin, and in the 7th-century Kadambari by Banabhatta, Murasaki Shikibu's 11th-century Japanese work The Tale of Genji, the 12th-century Hayy ibn Yaqdhan (or Philosophus Autodidactus, the 17th-century Latin title) by Ibn Tufail, who wrote in Arabic, the 13th-century Theologus Autodidactus by Ibn al-Nafis, another Arabic novelist, and Blanquerna, written in Catalan by Ramon Llull (1283), and the 14th-century Chinese Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong.
Blanquerna is a novel written around 1283 by Ramon Llull.

Chrétien de Troyes

Chretien de TroyesArthus de BretagneChrestien
While prose rather than verse became the standard of the modern novel, the ancestors of the modern European novel include verse epics in the Romance language of southern France, especially those by Chrétien de Troyes (late 12th century), and in Middle English (Geoffrey Chaucer's (c. 1343 – 1400) The Canterbury Tales). Even in the 19th century, fictional narratives in verse, such as Lord Byron's Don Juan (1824), Alexander Pushkin's Yevgeniy Onegin (1833), and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh (1856), competed with prose novels.
His use of structure, particularly in Yvain, has been seen as a step towards the modern novel.

The Tale of Genji

Genji MonogatariTale of GenjiGenji
Early works of extended fictional prose, or novels, include works in Latin like the Satyricon by Petronius (c. 50 AD), and The Golden Ass by Apuleius (c. 150 AD), works in Ancient Greek such as Daphnis and Chloe by Longus (c. late second century AD), works in Sanskrit such as the 6th– or 7th-century Daśakumāracarita by Daṇḍin, and in the 7th-century Kadambari by Banabhatta, Murasaki Shikibu's 11th-century Japanese work The Tale of Genji, the 12th-century Hayy ibn Yaqdhan (or Philosophus Autodidactus, the 17th-century Latin title) by Ibn Tufail, who wrote in Arabic, the 13th-century Theologus Autodidactus by Ibn al-Nafis, another Arabic novelist, and Blanquerna, written in Catalan by Ramon Llull (1283), and the 14th-century Chinese Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong. Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji (1010) has been described as the world's first novel and shows essentially all the qualities for which Marie de La Fayette's novel La Princesse de Clèves (1678) has been praised: individuality of perception, an interest in character development, and psychological observation. Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji (1010) has been described as the world's first novel.
It is sometimes called the world's first novel, the first modern novel, the first psychological novel or the first novel still to be considered a classic.

Picaresque novel

picaresquepicaropicaresque novels
Classical Greek and Roman prose narratives included a didactic strand, with the philosopher Plato's (c. 425 – c. 348 BC) dialogues; a satirical dimension with Petronius' Satyricon; the incredible stories of Lucian of Samosata; and Lucius Apuleius' proto-picaresque The Golden Ass, as well as the heroic romances of the Greeks Heliodorus and Longus.
The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresca, from pícaro, for "rogue" or "rascal") is a genre of prose fiction that depicts the adventures of a roguish, but "appealing hero", of low social class, who lives by their wits in a corrupt society.

Genre

subgenregenressubgenres
The entire genre has been seen as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years", with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the Italian renaissance novella.
The most general genres in literature are (in loose chronological order) epic, tragedy, comedy, novel, and short story.

Novella

novelettenovellasshort novel
The entire genre has been seen as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years", with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the Italian renaissance novella.
A novella is a text of written, fictional, narrative prose normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel, somewhere between 17,500 and 40,000 words.

Book

booksmonographbiblio
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book.
The novel is the most common form of fiction book.

Joseph Andrews

History of Joseph Andrewsnovel of the same name
Other important works of the tradition are Paul Scarron's Roman Comique (1651–57), the anonymous French Rozelli with its satire on Europe's religions, Alain-René Lesage's Gil Blas (1715–1735), Henry Fielding's Joseph Andrews (1742) and Tom Jones (1749), and Denis Diderot's Jacques the Fatalist (1773, printed posthumously in 1796).
Joseph Andrews, or The History of the Adventures of Joseph Andrews and of his Friend Mr. Abraham Adams, was the first published full-length novel of the English author Henry Fielding, and indeed among the first novels in the English language.

Kadambari

KādambariKādambarīPrincess Kadámbari
Early works of extended fictional prose, or novels, include works in Latin like the Satyricon by Petronius (c. 50 AD), and The Golden Ass by Apuleius (c. 150 AD), works in Ancient Greek such as Daphnis and Chloe by Longus (c. late second century AD), works in Sanskrit such as the 6th– or 7th-century Daśakumāracarita by Daṇḍin, and in the 7th-century Kadambari by Banabhatta, Murasaki Shikibu's 11th-century Japanese work The Tale of Genji, the 12th-century Hayy ibn Yaqdhan (or Philosophus Autodidactus, the 17th-century Latin title) by Ibn Tufail, who wrote in Arabic, the 13th-century Theologus Autodidactus by Ibn al-Nafis, another Arabic novelist, and Blanquerna, written in Catalan by Ramon Llull (1283), and the 14th-century Chinese Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong.
This work can be plausibly claimed to be one of the first novels in the world; making due allowance for the ambiguities of such a classification.

Epistolary novel

epistolaryepistolary formepistolary novels
Collections of letters and memoirs appeared, and were filled with the intriguing new subject matter and the epistolary novel grew from this and led to the first full blown example of scandalous fiction in Aphra Behn's Love-Letters Between a Nobleman and His Sister (1684/ 1685/ 1687).
An epistolary novel is a novel written as a series of documents.

Jacques the Fatalist

Jacques le fataliste et son maître Jacques Le FatalisteJacques the Fatalist and his Master
Other important works of the tradition are Paul Scarron's Roman Comique (1651–57), the anonymous French Rozelli with its satire on Europe's religions, Alain-René Lesage's Gil Blas (1715–1735), Henry Fielding's Joseph Andrews (1742) and Tom Jones (1749), and Denis Diderot's Jacques the Fatalist (1773, printed posthumously in 1796).
Jacques the Fatalist and his Master (Jacques le fataliste et son maître) is a novel by Denis Diderot, written during the period 1765–1780.

Eliza Haywood

Haywood, Elizabeth
The new developments did, however, lead to Eliza Haywood's epic length novel, Love in Excess (1719/20) and to Samuel Richardson's Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1741).
Haywood is a significant figure of the 18th century as one of the important founders of the novel in English.