Nuremberg

NürnbergNuremberg, GermanyNürembergNurnbergNürnberg, GermanyCity of NurembergNurenbergNeurenbergNuerembergNuremburg
Nuremberg (Nürnberg ; East Franconian: Närrnberch or Nämberch, locally Närmberch) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, and its 511,628 (2016) inhabitants make it the 14th largest city in Germany.wikipedia
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Bavaria

BayernFree State of BavariaBavarian
Nuremberg (Nürnberg ; East Franconian: Närrnberch or Nämberch, locally Närmberch) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, and its 511,628 (2016) inhabitants make it the 14th largest city in Germany.
Bavaria's main cities are Munich (its capital and largest city and also the third largest city in Germany ), Nuremberg and Augsburg.

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Nuremberg (Nürnberg ; East Franconian: Närrnberch or Nämberch, locally Närmberch) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, and its 511,628 (2016) inhabitants make it the 14th largest city in Germany.
Germany's largest urban area is the Ruhr; the country's other major cities include Hamburg, Munich, Cologne, Stuttgart, Düsseldorf, Leipzig, Bremen, Dresden, Hanover, and Nuremberg.

Fürth

FuerthFürth districtFurth
On the Pegnitz River (from its confluence with the Rednitz in Fürth onwards: Regnitz, a tributary of the River Main) and the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal, it lies in the Bavarian administrative region of Middle Franconia, and is the largest city and the unofficial capital of Franconia. Nuremberg forms a continuous conurbation with the neighbouring cities of Fürth, Erlangen and Schwabach with a total population of 787,976 (2016), while the larger Nuremberg Metropolitan Region has approximately 3.5 million inhabitants.
It is now contiguous with the larger city of Nuremberg, the centres of the two cities being only 7 km apart.

Franconia

FranconiansFrankenFranconian
On the Pegnitz River (from its confluence with the Rednitz in Fürth onwards: Regnitz, a tributary of the River Main) and the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal, it lies in the Bavarian administrative region of Middle Franconia, and is the largest city and the unofficial capital of Franconia.
"Core Franconia" is constituted by the three administrative regions of Lower, Middle, and Upper Franconia (largest cities: Würzburg, Nuremberg, and Bamberg, respectively) of the state of Bavaria.

Erlangen

Erlangen, GermanyBüchenbach (Erlangen)Büchenbach/Erlangen
Nuremberg forms a continuous conurbation with the neighbouring cities of Fürth, Erlangen and Schwabach with a total population of 787,976 (2016), while the larger Nuremberg Metropolitan Region has approximately 3.5 million inhabitants.
Together with Nuremberg, Fürth and Schwabach, Erlangen forms one of the three metropolises in Bavaria.

University of Erlangen–Nuremberg

University of ErlangenUniversity of Erlangen-NurembergErlangen
There are many institutions of higher education in the city, most notably the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg), with 39,780 students (2017) Bavaria's third and Germany's 11th largest university with campuses in Erlangen and Nuremberg and a university hospital in Erlangen (Universitätsklinikum Erlangen); Technische Hochschule Nürnberg Georg Simon Ohm; and Hochschule für Musik Nürnberg.
Friedrich–Alexander University Erlangen–Nürnberg (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, FAU) is a public research university in the cities of Erlangen and Nuremberg in Bavaria, Germany.

Rhine–Main–Danube Canal

Rhine-Main-Danube CanalMain-Danube CanalRhine-Main-Danube
On the Pegnitz River (from its confluence with the Rednitz in Fürth onwards: Regnitz, a tributary of the River Main) and the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal, it lies in the Bavarian administrative region of Middle Franconia, and is the largest city and the unofficial capital of Franconia.
The Rhine–Main–Danube Canal (German: Rhein-Main-Donau-Kanal; also called Main-Danube Canal, RMD Canal or Europa Canal), in Bavaria, Germany, connects the Main and the Danube rivers across the European Watershed, running from Bamberg via Nuremberg to Kelheim.

East Franconian German

East FranconianFranconian(East) Franconian dialect
Nuremberg (Nürnberg ; East Franconian: Närrnberch or Nämberch, locally Närmberch) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, and its 511,628 (2016) inhabitants make it the 14th largest city in Germany.
East Franconian (Ostfränkisch), usually referred to as Franconian (Fränkisch) in German, is a dialect which is spoken in Franconia, the northern part of the federal state of Bavaria and other areas in Germany around Nuremberg, Bamberg, Coburg, Würzburg, Hof, Bayreuth, Meiningen, Bad Mergentheim, and Crailsheim.

Nuremberg Airport

NurembergAlbrecht Dürer AirportEDDN
Nuremberg Airport (Flughafen Nürnberg “Albrecht Dürer“) is the second-busiest airport of Bavaria after Munich Airport, and the tenth-busiest airport of Germany.
Nuremberg Airport, Albrecht Dürer Flughafen Nürnberg, is the international airport of the Franconian metropolitan area of Nuremberg and the second-busiest airport in Bavaria after Munich Airport.

Schwabach

Schwabach, Kreisfreie Stadt
Nuremberg forms a continuous conurbation with the neighbouring cities of Fürth, Erlangen and Schwabach with a total population of 787,976 (2016), while the larger Nuremberg Metropolitan Region has approximately 3.5 million inhabitants.
Schwabach is a German town of about 40,000 inhabitants near Nuremberg in the centre of the region of Franconia in the north of Bavaria.

Nuremberg trials

NurembergInternational Military TribunalNuremberg Trial
Nuremberg was the site of major Nazi rallies, and it provided the site for the Nuremberg trials, which held to account many major Nazi officials.
The trials were held in Nuremberg, Germany, and their decisions marked a turning point between classical and contemporary international law.

Nuremberg Metropolitan Region

European Metropolitan Region of Nurembergmetropolitan region of NurembergNuremberg
Nuremberg forms a continuous conurbation with the neighbouring cities of Fürth, Erlangen and Schwabach with a total population of 787,976 (2016), while the larger Nuremberg Metropolitan Region has approximately 3.5 million inhabitants.
The major cities are Nuremberg, Fürth, Erlangen, Bayreuth and Bamberg.

Nuremberg Castle

KaiserburgBurg Nürnbergcastle
Nuremberg is often referred to as the "unofficial capital" of the Holy Roman Empire, particularly because the Imperial Diet (Reichstag) and courts met at Nuremberg Castle.
Nuremberg Castle (Nürnberger Burg) is a group of medieval fortified buildings on a sandstone ridge dominating the historical center of Nuremberg in Bavaria, Germany.

Johann Pachelbel

PachelbelPachelbel, JohannJohann Pachebel
Nuremberg is the birthplace of Albrecht Dürer and Johann Pachelbel.
He was influenced by southern German composers, such as Johann Jakob Froberger and Johann Caspar Kerll, Italians such as Girolamo Frescobaldi and Alessandro Poglietti, French composers, and the composers of the Nuremberg tradition.

Munich

Munich, GermanyMünchenMunich, West Germany
Nuremberg (Nürnberg ; East Franconian: Närrnberch or Nämberch, locally Närmberch) is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, and its 511,628 (2016) inhabitants make it the 14th largest city in Germany.
Bavaria's second most populous city, Nuremberg, is also one of the very few Bavarian cities governed by an SPD-led coalition.

Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor

SigismundSigismund of LuxembourgEmperor Sigismund
The royal and Imperial connection grew stronger in 1423 when the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund of Luxembourg granted the Imperial regalia to be kept permanently in Nuremberg, where they remained until 1796, when the advance of French troops required their removal to Regensburg and thence to Vienna.
Sigismund of Luxembourg (15 February 1368 in Nuremberg – 9 December 1437 in Znaim, Moravia) was prince-elector of Brandenburg from 1378 until 1388 and from 1411 until 1415, king of Hungary and Croatia from 1387, king of Germany from 1411, king of Bohemia from 1419, king of Italy from 1431, and Holy Roman emperor from 1433 until 1437, and the last male member of the House of Luxembourg.

Frederick I, Burgrave of Nuremberg

Frederick IFrederick IIIFrederick
With the extinction of their male line around 1190, the last Raabs count's son-in-law, Frederick I from the House of Hohenzollern, inherited the burgraviate in 1192.
Friedrich I of Nuremberg (before 1139 – after 1 October 1200), the first Burgrave of Nuremberg from the House of Hohenzollern.

Middle Franconia

MittelfrankenMiddleCentral Franconia
On the Pegnitz River (from its confluence with the Rednitz in Fürth onwards: Regnitz, a tributary of the River Main) and the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal, it lies in the Bavarian administrative region of Middle Franconia, and is the largest city and the unofficial capital of Franconia.
The administrative seat is Ansbach, however the most populous city is Nuremberg.

Diets of Nuremberg

Diet of NurembergNurembergFirst Diet of Nuremberg
The Diets of Nuremberg played an important role in the administration of the empire.
The Diets of Nuremberg, also called the Imperial Diets of Nuremberg, took place at different times between the Middle Ages and the 17th century.

Imperial castle

The first documentary mention of the city, in 1050, mentions Nuremberg as the location of an Imperial castle between the East Franks and the Bavarian March of the Nordgau.

Imperial Diet (Holy Roman Empire)

Imperial DietReichstagDiet
Nuremberg is often referred to as the "unofficial capital" of the Holy Roman Empire, particularly because the Imperial Diet (Reichstag) and courts met at Nuremberg Castle.
Probably the most famous Diets were those held in Worms in 1495, where the Imperial Reform was enacted, and 1521, where Martin Luther was banned (see Edict of Worms), the Diets of Speyer 1526 and 1529 (see Protestation at Speyer), and several in Nuremberg (Diet of Nuremberg).

Siege of Nuremberg

besieged
In 1632, the city, occupied by the forces of Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, was besieged by the army of Imperial general Albrecht von Wallenstein.
The Siege of Nuremberg or Siege of Nürnberg was a battle campaign that took place in 1632 about the Imperial City of Nuremberg during the Thirty Years' War.

Frederick I, Elector of Brandenburg

Frederick IFrederick I of BrandenburgFrederick VI
After fire destroyed the castle in 1420 during a feud between Frederick IV (from 1417 Margrave of Brandenburg) and the duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt, the city purchased the ruins and the forest belonging to the castle (1427), resulting in the city's total sovereignty within its borders.
Frederick was born in Nuremberg, the second-born son of Burgrave Frederick V (1333–1398) and the Wettin princess Elisabeth of Meissen.

Albrecht Dürer

DürerDurerAlbrecht Durer
Nuremberg is the birthplace of Albrecht Dürer and Johann Pachelbel.
On his return to Nuremberg in 1495, Dürer opened his own workshop (being married was a requirement for this).

German town law

town privilegestowncity rights
In 1219 Emperor Frederick II granted the Großen Freiheitsbrief ('Great Letter of Freedom'), including town rights, Imperial immediacy (Reichsfreiheit), the privilege to mint coins, and an independent customs policy - almost wholly removing the city from the purview of the burgraves.
As Germans began settling eastward, the colonists modelled their town laws on the pre-existing 12th century laws of Cologne in the west, Lübeck in the north (Lübeck law), Magdeburg in the east (Magdeburg rights), and either Nuremberg or Vienna in the south.