O Canada

Canadian national anthemCanadiannational anthemCANCanadaCanada's national anthemOh Canadathe national anthemÔ CanadaNational Anthem of Canada
"O Canada" (Ô Canada) is the national anthem of Canada.wikipedia
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Robert Stanley Weir

Multiple English versions ensued, with Robert Stanley Weir's version in 1908 gaining the most popularity, eventually serving as the basis for the official lyrics enacted by Parliament.
Robert Stanley Weir (November 15, 1856 – August 20, 1926) was a Montreal, Quebec judge and poet most famous for writing the English lyrics to "O Canada", the national anthem of Canada.

Calixa Lavallée

CalixaCalixa LavalleeCalixte Paquet dit Lavallée
The song was originally commissioned by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Théodore Robitaille for the 1880 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony; Calixa Lavallée composed the music, after which, words were written by the poet and judge Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier. The French lyrics of "O Canada" were written by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier, to music composed by Calixa Lavallée, as a French Canadian patriotic song for the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society and first performed on June 24, 1880, at a Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day banquet in Quebec City.
He is best known for composing the music for "O Canada," which officially became the national anthem of Canada in 1980, after a vote in the Senate and the House of Commons.

Adolphe-Basile Routhier

Sir Adolphe-Basile RouthierAdolphe B. RouthierAdolphe Basile Routhier
The song was originally commissioned by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Théodore Robitaille for the 1880 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony; Calixa Lavallée composed the music, after which, words were written by the poet and judge Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier. The French lyrics of "O Canada" were written by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier, to music composed by Calixa Lavallée, as a French Canadian patriotic song for the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society and first performed on June 24, 1880, at a Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day banquet in Quebec City.
He wrote the lyrics of the original French version of the Canadian national anthem "O Canada".

Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day

Fête nationale du QuébecNational HolidayNational Holiday of Quebec
The song was originally commissioned by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Théodore Robitaille for the 1880 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony; Calixa Lavallée composed the music, after which, words were written by the poet and judge Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier. The French lyrics of "O Canada" were written by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier, to music composed by Calixa Lavallée, as a French Canadian patriotic song for the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society and first performed on June 24, 1880, at a Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day banquet in Quebec City.
On this occasion, the citizens of Quebec City were the first ones to hear the "Ô Canada" of Calixa Lavallée, based on a poem by a Quebec Superior Court judge, Adolphe-Basile Routhier.

God Save the Queen

God Save the Kingnational anthemBritish national anthem
At that time, the "Chant National", also by Routhier, was popular amongst Francophones as an anthem, while "God Save the Queen" and "The Maple Leaf Forever" had, since 1867, been competing as unofficial national anthems in English Canada. In 1967, the Prime Minister advised Governor General Georges Vanier to appoint the Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on the National and Royal Anthems; the group first met in February and, within two months, on April 12, 1967, presented its conclusion that "O Canada" should be designated as the national anthem and "God Save the Queen" as the royal anthem of Canada, one verse from each, in both official languages, to be adopted by parliament.
The first six bars also form all or part of the Vice Regal Salute in some Commonwealth realms other than the UK (e.g., in Canada, governors general and lieutenant governors at official events are saluted with the first six bars of "God Save the Queen" followed by the first four and last four bars of "O Canada"), as well as the salute given to governors of British overseas territories.

Théodore Robitaille

The song was originally commissioned by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Théodore Robitaille for the 1880 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony; Calixa Lavallée composed the music, after which, words were written by the poet and judge Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier.
Notably, during his tenure he commissioned Calixa Lavallée and Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier to prepare the music and French lyrics to what would become Canada's national anthem, O Canada.

Canada Day

Dominion DayJuly 1Canada
"O Canada" had served as a de facto national anthem since 1939, officially becoming the country's national anthem in 1980 when Canada's National Anthem Act received royal assent and became effective on July 1 as part of that year's Dominion Day (today's Canada Day) celebrations.
As the anniversary of Confederation, Dominion Day, and later Canada Day, was the date set for a number of important events, such as the first national radio network hookup by the Canadian National Railway (1927); the inauguration of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's cross-country television broadcast, with Governor General Vincent Massey's Dominion Day speech from Parliament Hill (1958); the flooding of the Saint Lawrence Seaway (1958); the first colour television transmission in Canada (1966); the inauguration of the Order of Canada (1967); and the establishment of "O Canada" as the country's national anthem (1980).

National anthem

anthemnational songstate anthem
"O Canada" (Ô Canada) is the national anthem of Canada.

Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society

Société Saint-Jean-BaptisteAssociation Saint-Jean-BaptisteSociété Saint-Jean-Baptiste de Montréal
The French lyrics of "O Canada" were written by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier, to music composed by Calixa Lavallée, as a French Canadian patriotic song for the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society and first performed on June 24, 1880, at a Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day banquet in Quebec City.
The motto was "Our institutions, our language and our rights." Initially, the society adopted the maple leaf as its emblem, and its Quebec City branch was the first promoter of the song "O Canada" as a symbol of the French-Canadian nation, together with the Carillon Sacré-Coeur flag.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
"O Canada" (Ô Canada) is the national anthem of Canada.
The national anthem of Canada, "O Canada", was originally commissioned by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, the Honourable Théodore Robitaille, for the 1880 St. Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony, and was officially adopted in 1980.

Coat of arms of Manitoba

ManitobaArms of Majesty in Right of Manitobaarms of Manitoba
Two provinces have adopted Latin translations of phrases from the English lyrics as their mottos: Manitoba—Gloriosus et Liber (Glorious and Free) —and Alberta—Fortis et Liber (Strong and Free).
:The motto is Gloriosus et Liber, "glorious and free," a line taken from the English lyrics to the Canadian national anthem "O Canada."

Coat of arms of Alberta

AlbertaAlberta's coat of armsArms of Majesty in Right of Alberta
Two provinces have adopted Latin translations of phrases from the English lyrics as their mottos: Manitoba—Gloriosus et Liber (Glorious and Free) —and Alberta—Fortis et Liber (Strong and Free).

Governor General of Canada

Governor GeneralGovernor-General of CanadaGovernor-General
In 1967, the Prime Minister advised Governor General Georges Vanier to appoint the Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on the National and Royal Anthems; the group first met in February and, within two months, on April 12, 1967, presented its conclusion that "O Canada" should be designated as the national anthem and "God Save the Queen" as the royal anthem of Canada, one verse from each, in both official languages, to be adopted by parliament.
The Viceregal Salute—composed of the first six bars of the Royal Anthem ("God Save the ") followed by the first and last four bars of the national anthem ("O Canada")—is the salute used to greet the governor general upon arrival at, and mark his or her departure from most official events.

Akina Shirt

At a National Hockey League (NHL) game in Calgary, in February 2007, Cree singer Akina Shirt became the first person ever to perform "O Canada" in the Cree language at such an event.
Shirt gained fame by singing "O Canada" in Cree at a National Hockey League game between the Calgary Flames and the Vancouver Canucks on February 3, 2007.

2010 Winter Olympics

20102010 Winter Olympic GamesVancouver 2010
The lyrics and melody of "O Canada" are both in the public domain, a status unaffected by the trademarking of the phrases "with glowing hearts" and "des plus brillants exploits" for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

Anthems and nationalistic songs of Canada

Patriotic music in CanadaCanadian Patriotic songs
"O Canada" is the national anthem of Canada.

National War Memorial (Canada)

National War MemorialNational War Memorial of CanadaCanadian National War Memorial
The tune was thought to have become the de facto national anthem after King George VI remained at attention during its playing at the dedication of the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Ontario, on May 21, 1939; though George was actually following a precedent set by his brother, Edward, the previous king of Canada, when he dedicated the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France in 1936.
It is thought that "O Canada" became the de facto national anthem after the King remained at attention during its playing at the dedication of the National War Memorial; George, though, was actually following a precedent set by his brother, Edward, the previous king of Canada, when he dedicated the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France in 1936.

Honors music

royal anthemViceregal SalutePresidential Anthem
In 1967, the Prime Minister advised Governor General Georges Vanier to appoint the Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on the National and Royal Anthems; the group first met in February and, within two months, on April 12, 1967, presented its conclusion that "O Canada" should be designated as the national anthem and "God Save the Queen" as the royal anthem of Canada, one verse from each, in both official languages, to be adopted by parliament.

The Star-Spangled Banner

national anthemThe Star Spangled BannerStar Spangled Banner
Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, the National Basketball Association, and the NHL all require venues to perform both the Canadian and American national anthems at games that involve teams from both countries (including all-star games), with the away team's anthem being performed first, followed by the host country.
The National Hockey League and Major League Soccer both require venues in both the U.S. and Canada to perform both the Canadian and U.S. national anthems at games that involve teams from both countries (with the "away" anthem being performed first).

Mauril Bélanger

Mauril Belanger
In another attempt to make the anthem gender-neutral, Liberal MP Mauril Bélanger introduced a private member's bill in September 2014.
In January 2016, Bélanger became the first MP to use a voice generator in the House of Commons when he used an app on his tablet to introduce a private member's bill to amend to lyrics of "O Canada" to make them gender-neutral, which he had failed to do through a similar bill in the last parliament by a 144–127 vote.

Music of Canada

CanadianCanadian musicCanada
God Save the King/Queen has been sung in Canada since British rule and by the mid-20th century was, along with "O Canada", one of the country's two de facto national anthems.

Buffalo Sabres

BuffaloBUFSabres
The NHL's Buffalo Sabres play both anthems before every home game, regardless of the opponent, in recognition of the team's significant Canadian fanbase.
Doug Allen sings the Canadian and US national anthems at most home games (except in cases where there is a conflict with his charitable work for the Wesleyan Church) and he is accompanied by organist Curtis Cook.

Toronto Blue Jays

Blue JaysTorontoTOR
Major League Baseball teams have played the song at games involving the Toronto Blue Jays and the former Montreal Expos, and National Basketball Association teams do so for games involving the Toronto Raptors, and previously, the Vancouver Grizzlies.
Since 2005, The Star Spangled Banner has been sung before O Canada at every home game.

Culture and traditions of the Ateneo de Manila

A Song for Mary
Titled "A Song for Mary" or simply "The Ateneo de Manila Graduation Hymn", the song's lyrics were written by James B. Reuter SJ, and the tune was adapted by Col. José Campaña.
Fr. James B. Reuter, S.J., wrote its lyrics and Ateneo band moderator Colonel José Campaña adapted the melody from the patriotic hymn O Canada.