Oath of office of the President of the United States

oath of officepresidential oath of officepresidential oathPresident's oath of officesworn in as presidentList of U.S. presidential swearing-insoath ceremonyoath of office for the Presidentpreserve, protect, and defend the United States Constitutionpresidential inaugural oath
The oath of office of the president of the United States is the oath or affirmation that the president of the United States takes after assuming the presidency but before exercising or carrying out any presidential powers or duties.wikipedia
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United States presidential inauguration

inaugurationInauguration Daypresidential inauguration
A newly elected or re-elected President of the United States begins his or her four-year term of office on the twentieth day of January following the election, and, by tradition, takes the oath of office during an inauguration on that date; prior to 1937 the president's term of office began on March 4.
In those years, the presidential oath of office was administered on that day privately and then again in a public ceremony the next day, on Monday, January 21.

Article Two of the United States Constitution

Article IIArticle TwoArticle II, Section 1, Clause 6
The wording of the oath is specified in Article II, Section One, Clause 8, of the United States Constitution.
Section 1 also sets forth the eligibility requirements for the office of the president, provides procedures in case of a presidential vacancy, and requires the president to take an oath of office.

Chief Justice of the United States

Chief JusticeChief Justice of the United States Supreme CourtChief Justice of the Supreme Court
While the Constitution does not mandate that anyone in particular should administer the presidential oath of office, it has been administered by the Chief Justice beginning with John Adams, except following the death of a sitting president.
Also, while nowhere mandated, the presidential oath of office is typically administered by the chief justice.

Presidency of George Washington

first inauguration of George WashingtonWashington administrationinaugurated
George Washington was sworn into office during his first inauguration, on April 30, 1789, by Chancellor of New York Robert Livingston.
As judges of the federal courts had not yet been appointed, the presidential oath of office was administered by Chancellor Robert Livingston, the highest judicial officer in the state of New York.

Vice President of the United States

Vice PresidentU.S. Vice Presidentvice presidential
Nine vice presidents have succeeded to the presidency upon the death or resignation of the president.
He took the presidential oath of office, and declined to acknowledge documents referring to him as "Acting President".

John Calvin Coolidge Sr.

John Calvin Coolidge, Sr.John CoolidgeCoolidge's father
Upon being informed of Warren Harding's death, while visiting his family home in Plymouth Notch, Vermont, Calvin Coolidge was sworn in as president by his father, John Calvin Coolidge Sr., a notary public.
He administered the presidential oath of office to his son at their family homestead on the early morning of August 3, 1923, following the death of President Warren G. Harding.

Robert R. Livingston (chancellor)

Robert R. LivingstonRobert LivingstonChancellor Livingston
George Washington was sworn into office during his first inauguration, on April 30, 1789, by Chancellor of New York Robert Livingston.
Livingston administered the presidential oath of office to George Washington at his first inauguration on April 30, 1789, at Federal Hall in New York City, which was then the nation's capital.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
A newly elected or re-elected President of the United States begins his or her four-year term of office on the twentieth day of January following the election, and, by tradition, takes the oath of office during an inauguration on that date; prior to 1937 the president's term of office began on March 4. The oath of office of the president of the United States is the oath or affirmation that the president of the United States takes after assuming the presidency but before exercising or carrying out any presidential powers or duties.
Before executing the powers of the office, a president is required to recite the Presidential Oath of Office, found in Article II, Section 1, Clause8 of the Constitution.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
George Washington was sworn into office during his first inauguration, on April 30, 1789, by Chancellor of New York Robert Livingston.
Washington was inaugurated on April 30, 1789, taking the oath of office at Federal Hall in New York City.

Affirmation in law

affirmationaffirmaffirmed
The oath of office of the president of the United States is the oath or affirmation that the president of the United States takes after assuming the presidency but before exercising or carrying out any presidential powers or duties.

Chester A. Arthur

Chester ArthurArthurChester Alan Arthur
In 1881, the New York Times article covering the swearing in of Chester A. Arthur, reported that he responded to the question of accepting the oath with the words, "I will, so help me God."
Judge John R. Brady of the New York Supreme Court administered the oath of office in Arthur's home at 2:15 a.m. on September 20.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
Both John Quincy Adams and Franklin Pierce swore on a book of law, with the intention that they were swearing on the constitution.
He took the oath of office on a book of constitutional law, instead of the more traditional Bible.

Sarah T. Hughes

Sarah HughesSarah Tilghman Hughes
Federal Judge Sarah T. Hughes administered the oath of office to Lyndon B. Johnson aboard Air Force One after John F. Kennedy's assassination on November 22, 1963; the only time a woman has administered the oath of office.
Two years into her tenure as a federal district judge, on November 22, 1963, Hughes was called upon to administer the oath of office to Lyndon B. Johnson after the assassination of President Kennedy, a task usually administered by the Chief Justice of the United States.

Second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln's second inaugurationsecond inaugurationAbraham Lincoln's second inauguration
In 1865 the Sacramento Daily Union covered the second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln.
Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase administered the Oath of office.

Oath of office of the Vice President of the United States

vice presidential oathsworn into officevice presidential oath of office
Just before the president-elect takes the oath of office on Inauguration Day, the vice president-elect will step forward on the inaugural platform and repeat the oath of office.

Michael Newdow

Newdow
A Federal lawsuit filed in the District of Columbia by Michael Newdow on December 30, 2008, contended the second, current form of administration, where both the chief justice and the president articulate the oath, appending "So help me God", to be a breach of the Constitutional instructions.
The outcome was that Mr. Obama did conclude with "So Help Me God" but the prompting was in the form of a query, indicating that this was his choice and not part of the constitutionally prescribed oath of office Oath of office of the President of the United States#"So help me God"

Chester A. Arthur Home

123 Lexington AvenueLexington Avenue homeNew York City home
Arthur was in residence here when Garfield died on September 19, and took the presidential oath of office in this building.

John Roberts

John G. RobertsRobertsChief Justice Roberts
Perhaps the best known of these is the custom of the chief justice administering the oath of office at presidential inaugurations.

Oath

sworn inoathspledge
The oath of office of the president of the United States is the oath or affirmation that the president of the United States takes after assuming the presidency but before exercising or carrying out any presidential powers or duties.

Powers of the president of the United States

at the pleasure of the PresidentCommander-in-Chiefexecutive power
The oath of office of the president of the United States is the oath or affirmation that the president of the United States takes after assuming the presidency but before exercising or carrying out any presidential powers or duties.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
The wording of the oath is specified in Article II, Section One, Clause 8, of the United States Constitution.

Article Six of the United States Constitution

Article VIArticle SixU.S. Const. art. VI
The other, Article VI, Clause 3, simply requires the persons specified therein to "be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution."

Fidelity

lo-fiNo-Fi fidelity
The presidential oath, on the other hand, requires much more than this general oath of allegiance and fidelity.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
A newly elected or re-elected President of the United States begins his or her four-year term of office on the twentieth day of January following the election, and, by tradition, takes the oath of office during an inauguration on that date; prior to 1937 the president's term of office began on March 4.