Oblast

provinceregionVoblastoblastsregions provinceOblast'' (Province)oblysyPodunavske oblastRegional
An oblast (also ) is a type of administrative division of Belarus, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Ukraine, and the former Soviet Union and Kingdom of Yugoslavia.wikipedia
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Raion

districtdistrictsraions
The last translation may lead to confusion, because "raion" may be used for other kinds of administrative subdivision, which may be translated as "region", "district", or "county" depending on the context.
A raion (also rayon) is a type of administrative unit of several post-Soviet states (such as part of an oblast).

Kars Oblast

Kars
The majority of then-existing oblasts were on the periphery of the country (e.g. Kars Oblast or Transcaspian Oblast) or covered the areas where Cossacks lived.
Kars Oblast (Карсская область, Karsskaya Oblast) was one of the oblasts of the Caucasus Viceroyalty of the Russian Empire between 1878 and 1917.

Bulgaria

BULBulgarianRepublic of Bulgaria
An oblast (also ) is a type of administrative division of Belarus, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Ukraine, and the former Soviet Union and Kingdom of Yugoslavia.
Between 1987 and 1999 the administrative structure consisted of nine provinces (oblasti, singular oblast).

Administrative division

Subdivisionssubdivisionadministrative district
An oblast (also ) is a type of administrative division of Belarus, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Ukraine, and the former Soviet Union and Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

Regions of Belarus

VoblastRegionSubdivision
Official terms in successor states of the Soviet Union differ, but some still use a cognate of the Russian term, e.g., voblast (voblasts, voblasts, ) is used for regions of Belarus, and oblys (plural: oblystar) for regions of Kazakhstan.
In Soviet Belarus, new administrative units, called voblast (cognate of Russian word oblast with prothetic v-) were introduced in 1938.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
An oblast (also ) is a type of administrative division of Belarus, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Ukraine, and the former Soviet Union and Kingdom of Yugoslavia.
Including Sevastopol and the Autonomous Republic of Crimea that were annexed by the Russian Federation in 2014, Ukraine consists of 27 regions: twenty-four oblasts (provinces), one autonomous republic (Autonomous Republic of Crimea), and two cities of special status – Kiev, the capital, and Sevastopol.

Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyz RepublicKyrgyzKyrghyzstan
An oblast (also ) is a type of administrative division of Belarus, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Ukraine, and the former Soviet Union and Kingdom of Yugoslavia.
oblast, pl. oblasttar administered by appointed governors.

Belarus

BLRRepublic of BelarusBelorussia
An oblast (also ) is a type of administrative division of Belarus, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Ukraine, and the former Soviet Union and Kingdom of Yugoslavia.
Belarus is divided into six regions, which are named after the cities that serve as their administrative centers.

Transcaspian Oblast

TranscaspiaTranscaspian RegionTranscaspian
The majority of then-existing oblasts were on the periphery of the country (e.g. Kars Oblast or Transcaspian Oblast) or covered the areas where Cossacks lived.
The name of the oblast (literally, "Beyond Caspian") is explained by the fact that until the construction of the Trans-Aral Railway in the early 20th century the easiest way to reach this oblast from central Russia (or from Russian Transcaucasia) was across the Caspian Sea, by boat from Astrakhan or Baku.

Province

ProvincialprovincesProvincial Reserved
Often translated as "area", "zone", "province", or "region".
In modern parlance, the term is commonly used to refer to the oblasts and krais of Russia.

Autonomous okrugs of Russia

autonomous okrugautonomous okrugs4 autonomous okrugs
Some oblasts also included autonomous entities called autonomous okrugs.
While the 1977 Constitution stipulated that the autonomous okrugs are subordinated to the oblasts and krais, this clause was revised on December 15, 1990, when it was specified that autonomous okrugs are subordinated directly to the Russian SFSR, although they still may stay in jurisdiction of a krai or an oblast to which they were subordinated before.

Region

Regionalregionslocal region
Often translated as "area", "zone", "province", or "region".
In English, the word is also used as the conventional translation for equivalent terms in other languages (e.g., the область (oblast), used in Russia alongside a broader term регион).

Krai

Krayprovince
In the Russian Empire, oblasts were considered to be administrative units and were included as parts of Governorates General or krais.
the administrative usage of the term is mostly traditional, as some oblasts also fit this description and there is no difference in legal status between the krais and the oblasts.

Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

Russian SFSRRSFSRSoviet Russia
The Russian Republic comprised sixteen smaller constituent units of autonomous republics, five autonomous oblasts, ten autonomous okrugs, six krais and forty oblasts.

Regions of Kyrgyzstan

RegionProvinceProvinces of Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan is divided into seven regions (singular: област - oblast, plural: областтар - oblasttar).

Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
In the Russian Empire, oblasts were considered to be administrative units and were included as parts of Governorates General or krais.
For administration, Russia was divided (as of 1914) into 81 governorates (guberniyas), 20 oblasts, and 1 okrug.

Georgia (country)

GeorgiaGeorgianRepublic of Georgia
Gamsakhurdia stoked Georgian nationalism and vowed to assert Tbilisi's authority over regions such as Abkhazia and South Ossetia that had been classified as autonomous oblasts under the Soviet Union.

Oblasts of Ukraine

ProvinceOblastRegion
In Ukraine the term Oblast denotes a primary administrative division.

Subdivisions of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia

banovinasbanovinabanate
In 1922, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was divided into 33 administrative divisions called oblasts.
In 1922, the state was divided into 33 oblasts or provinces and, in 1929, a new system of nine banates (in Serbo-Croatian, the word for "banate" is banovina) was implemented.

Oblasts of Russia

Oblastoblasts46 oblasts
The term oblast can be translated into English as "province" or "region", and there are currently 46 oblasts, the most common type of the 85 federal subjects in Russia.

Wilayah

wilayawilayatvelayat
Viloyat and welaýat are derived from the Turkish language term vilayet, itself derived from the Arabic language term wilāya
During the Soviet period the divisions of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan were called oblasts and raions, using Russian terminology.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

BosniaBosnia-HerzegovinaBosnian
During the Yugoslav Wars, several Serb Autonomous Oblasts were formed in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Although the initial split of the country into 33 oblasts erased the presence of traditional geographic entities from the map, the efforts of Bosnian politicians such as Mehmed Spaho ensured the six oblasts carved up from Bosnia and Herzegovina corresponded to the six sanjaks from Ottoman times and, thus, matched the country's traditional boundary as a whole.

Okrug

municipal okrugmunicipal okrugsokrugs
They existed in the post-War Bulgaria between 1946 and 1987 and corresponded approximately to today's oblasts.

Autonomous oblast

Oblast
An autonomous oblast is an autonomous entity within the state which is on the oblast (province) level of the overall administrative subdivision.

Croatia

Republic of CroatiaCroatianCRO
During the Yugoslav Wars, several Serb Autonomous Oblasts were formed in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The traditional division of the country into counties was abolished in the 1920s when the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes and the subsequent Kingdom of Yugoslavia introduced oblasts and banovinas respectively.