West Slav tribes in the 9th and 10th centuries
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
Reconstruction of the Slavic temple in Groß Raden
Map of the Billunger Mark (c. 1000) showing different tribes of the Obotritic confederation
West Slavic languages
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
The Limes Saxoniae forming the border between the Saxons to the west and the Obotrites to the east
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
Niklot (1090–1160), prince of the Obotritic confederation, Schwerin Castle

The Obotrites (Obotriti, Abodritorum, Abodritos…) or Obodrites, also spelled Abodrites (Abodriten), were a confederation of medieval West Slavic tribes within the territory of modern Mecklenburg and Holstein in northern Germany (see Polabian Slavs).

- Obotrites

907). The Sorbs and other Polabian Slavs like Obodrites and Veleti came under the domination of the Holy Roman Empire after the Wendish Crusade in the Middle Ages and had been strongly Germanized by Germans at the end of the 19th century.

- West Slavs

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Map of West-Central Europe from 919 to 1125, by William R. Shepherd. The territory of the Polabian Slavs is outlined in purple near the top, with the Obotrite and Veleti groups in white and the Sorb groups colored purple.

Polabian Slavs

Map of West-Central Europe from 919 to 1125, by William R. Shepherd. The territory of the Polabian Slavs is outlined in purple near the top, with the Obotrite and Veleti groups in white and the Sorb groups colored purple.
Polabian Slavic Tribes, green is uninhabited forested area
Reconstruction of Slavic gord in Groß Raden, Mecklenburg
Reconstruction of Slavic gord in Lusatia - Raddusch, Vetschau
The Limes Saxoniae border between the Saxons and the Lechites Obotrites, established about 810 in present-day Schleswig-Holstein
Primary source about history of Polabian Slavs - Chronica Slavorum of Helmold from the 12th century translated to Polish language by Jan Papłoński in 1862.
Danish Bishop Absalon destroys the idol of Slavic god Svantevit at Arkona in a painting by Laurits Tuxen.
Reconstruction of Slavic gord near Neubrandenburg
Reconstruction of Slavic gord at the Burgwallinsel (Gord Island)

Polabian Slavs (Połobske słowjany, Słowianie połabscy, ) is a collective term applied to a number of Lechitic (West Slavic) tribes who lived along the Elbe river in what is today eastern Germany.

Among other tribes it lists the Uuilci (Veleti) with 95 civitates, the Nortabtrezi (Obotrites) with 53 civitates, the Milzane (Milceni) with 30 civitates, and the Hehfeldi (Hevelli) with 14 civitates.

Slavic tribes from the 7th to 9th centuries AD in Europe

Wends

Historical name for Slavs living near Germanic settlement areas.

Historical name for Slavs living near Germanic settlement areas.

Slavic tribes from the 7th to 9th centuries AD in Europe
The Limes Saxoniae border between the Saxons and the Lechites Obotrites, established about 810 in present-day Schleswig-Holstein
Germaniae veteris typus (Old Germany). Aestui, Venedi, Gythones and Ingaevones are visible on the right upper corner of the map. Edited by Willem and Joan Blaeu, 1645.
The interior of the original Lutheran Church the Wends established in Serbin, Texas, St. Paul.
This 1940 ethnic map by an Austrian scholar uses the term Windische for the population of Styria, in parallel to Slowenen elsewhere in Slovenia

In German-speaking Europe during the Middle Ages, the term "Wends" was interpreted as synonymous with "Slavs" and sporadically used in literature to refer to West Slavs and South Slavs living within the Holy Roman Empire.

For the medieval Scandinavians, the term Wends (Vender) meant Slavs living near the southern shore of the Baltic Sea (Vendland), and the term was therefore used to refer to Polabian Slavs like the Obotrites, Rugian Slavs, Veleti/Lutici and Pomeranian tribes.

The Capture of the Wends

Wendish Crusade

Military campaign in 1147, one of the Northern Crusades and a part of the Second Crusade, led primarily by the Kingdom of Germany within the Holy Roman Empire and directed against the Polabian Slavs (or "Wends").

Military campaign in 1147, one of the Northern Crusades and a part of the Second Crusade, led primarily by the Kingdom of Germany within the Holy Roman Empire and directed against the Polabian Slavs (or "Wends").

The Capture of the Wends
Henry's duchies Saxony and Bavaria

The Wends were made up of the Slavic tribes of Abrotrites, Rani, Liutizians, Wagarians, and Pomeranians who lived east of the River Elbe in present-day northeast Germany and Poland.

By the early 12th century, the German archbishoprics of Bremen and Magdeburg sought the conversion to Christianity of neighboring pagan West Slavs through peaceful means.

A map of the Billung March showing the location of the Warnabi.

Warnabi

A map of the Billung March showing the location of the Warnabi.

The Warnabi, Warnavi, Warnahi, Wranovi, Wranefzi, Wrani, Varnes, or Warnower were a West Slavic tribe of the Obotrite confederation in the ninth through eleventh centuries.