Occupy Wall Street

OccupyOccupy Wall Street Movement#OccupyWallStreet2011 Occupy Movement2011 Occupy Wall Street MovementdemonstratorsNew York CityoccupiedOccupiersOccupy D.C.
Occupy Wall Street (OWS) was a left-wing protest movement that began on September 17, 2011, in Zuccotti Park, located in New York City's Wall Street financial district, against economic inequality.wikipedia
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New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Occupy Wall Street (OWS) was a left-wing protest movement that began on September 17, 2011, in Zuccotti Park, located in New York City's Wall Street financial district, against economic inequality.
The Occupy Wall Street protests in Zuccotti Park in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan began on September 17, 2011, receiving global attention and popularizing the Occupy movement against social and economic inequality worldwide.

General assembly (Occupy movement)

General Assemblygeneral assemblies
To achieve their goals, protesters acted on consensus-based decisions made in general assemblies which emphasized redress through direct action over the petitioning to authorities.
General Assemblies had been used by the Occupy Wall Street movement since its planning stages in August 2011, and were held in Zuccotti Park during the occupation itself.

Adbusters

Adbuster's Culture Jammer's HeadquartersAdbusters FoundationAdbusters Media Foundation
The Canadian anti-consumerist and pro-environment group/magazine Adbusters initiated the call for a protest. The original protest was initiated by Kalle Lasn and Micah White of Adbusters, a Canadian anti-consumerist publication, who conceived of a September 17 occupation in Lower Manhattan.
Adbusters has launched numerous international campaigns, including Buy Nothing Day, TV Turnoff Week and Occupy Wall Street, and is known for their "subvertisements" that spoof popular advertisements.

Occupy movement in the United States

Occupy Movementanti–Wall Street movementOccupy Cincinnati
Occupy Wall Street, in turn, gave rise to the Occupy movement in the United States.
The Occupy movement began in the United States initially with the Occupy Wall Street protests but spread to many other cities, both in the United States and worldwide.

David Graeber

Graeber, DavidGraeber
Activist, anarchist and anthropologist David Graeber and several of his associates attended the NYAB general assembly but, disappointed that the event was intended to be a precursor to marching on Wall Street with predetermined demands, Graeber and his small group created their own general assembly, which eventually developed into the New York General Assembly.
Graeber was a leading figure in the Occupy Wall Street movement, and is sometimes credited with having coined the slogan, "We are the 99 percent".

Zuccotti Park

Liberty Plaza Park
Occupy Wall Street (OWS) was a left-wing protest movement that began on September 17, 2011, in Zuccotti Park, located in New York City's Wall Street financial district, against economic inequality.
In 2011, the plaza became the site of the Occupy Wall Street protest camp, during which activists occupied the plaza and used it as a staging ground for their protests throughout Financial District, Manhattan.

Wall Street

WallNew York financial districtWallStreet
Occupy Wall Street (OWS) was a left-wing protest movement that began on September 17, 2011, in Zuccotti Park, located in New York City's Wall Street financial district, against economic inequality.
Beginning in September 2011, demonstrators disenchanted with the financial system protested in parks and plazas around Wall Street.

Nathan Schneider

Meanwhile, several similar proposals were being explored by independent groups, as reported by journalist Nathan Schneider in his book Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse.
Schneider was among the first journalists to cover the Occupy Wall Street movement during its planning stages and wrote about it for Harper's Magazine, The Nation, The New York Times, and other publications, as well as in his 2013 book Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse, published by University of California Press.

Anonymous (group)

AnonymousAnonymous PhilippinesAnonymous hacktivist group
Thousands of people, organized by a group of labor unions marched on Wall Street 12; the online collective Anonymous attempted an occupation on June 14; activists planned an indefinite occupation of Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C., which eventually became known as Occupy Washington, D.C.
When the Occupy Wall Street protests began in New York City in September 2011, Anons were early participants and helped spread the movement to other cities such as Boston.

99 Percent Declaration

One OWS group that favored specific demands created a document entitled the 99 Percent Declaration, but this was regarded as an attempt to "co-opt" the "Occupy" name, and the document and group were rejected by the General Assemblies of Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Philadelphia.
The 99 Percent Declaration or 99% Declaration is a not-for-profit organization based in Kentucky that originated from a working group of the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement in Zuccotti Park, New York City in October 2011.

Occupy (book)

OccupyOccupy'' (book)
Occupy, the first book in the series, by Noam Chomsky was launched on May 1, 2012.
Initially published in the United States by the Zuccotti Park Press as the first title in their Occupied Media Pamphlet Series in 2012, it was subsequently republished in the United Kingdom by Penguin Books later that year.

Liberty Square Blueprint

However others, such as those who issued the Liberty Square Blueprint, are opposed to setting demands, saying they would limit the movement by implying conditions and limiting the duration of the movement.
The Liberty Square Blueprint was an Occupy Wall Street manifesto consisting in a collection of loosely defined goals authored by about 250 protesters.

Charging Bull

Wall Street Bull
The protest was promoted with an image featuring a dancer atop Wall Street's iconic Charging Bull statue.
The Occupy Wall Street protests used the bull as a symbolic figure around which to direct their critiques of corporate greed.

Occupy Sandy

As part of the Occupy Sandy disaster response to Hurricane Sandy, Occuprint created a 12 page resource pamphlet on how to survive and seek help, after determining that the FEMA booklets were incomplete.
Like other Occupy Movement offshoots, such as Occupy Our Homes, Occupy University, Occupy the SEC, and Rolling Jubilee, Occupy Sandy is made up of former and present Occupy Wall Street protesters, other members of the Occupy movement, and former non-Occupy volunteers.

Occupy Homes

Occupy Our Homesalleviation of the foreclosure situation
OWS's goals included a reduction in the influence of corporations on politics, more balanced distribution of income, more and better jobs, bank reform (especially to curtail speculative trading by banks), forgiveness of student loan debt or other relief for indebted students, and alleviation of the foreclosure situation.
On December 6, 2011, Occupy Our Homes, an offshoot of Occupy Wall Street, said it was embarking on a "National Day of Action" to protest the mistreatment of homeowners by big banks, who they say made billions of dollars off of the housing bubble by offering predatory loans and indulging in practices that took advantage of consumers.

Cecily McMillan

Gazette' was founded by editors Astra Taylor, Keith Gessen of N+1 and Sarah Leonard of Dissent Magazine. It published five issues from October 2011 to September 2012, with a commemorative sixth issue published in May 2014, to support OWS activist Cecily McMillan during the sentencing phase of her trial.
Cecily McMillan (born 1988) is an American activist and advocate for prisoner rights in the United States who was arrested and subsequently convicted of felony second-degree assault after assaulting a New York City Police officer as he led her out of the Occupy Wall Street protest in Zuccotti Park on March 17, 2012.

Human microphone

mic checkmic checkedmic-checking
Since Occupy Wall Street did not have a permit, the protesters created the "human microphone" in which a speaker pauses while the nearby members of the audience repeat the phrase in unison.
This method of communication attracted attention due to its use by Occupy Wall Street.

Direct action

non-violent direct actiondirect actionsdirect-action
To achieve their goals, protesters acted on consensus-based decisions made in general assemblies which emphasized redress through direct action over the petitioning to authorities.
Occupy Wall Street

Kalle Lasn

The original protest was initiated by Kalle Lasn and Micah White of Adbusters, a Canadian anti-consumerist publication, who conceived of a September 17 occupation in Lower Manhattan.
Lasn, in collaboration with Micah White, came up with the original idea for an Occupy Wall Street (OWS) demonstration, but has been careful not to claim ownership of it.

Anti-austerity movement in Greece

2010–2011 Greek protestsGreece2010–12 Greek protests
More recent prototypes for OWS include the British student protests of 2010, 2009-2010 Iranian election protests, the Arab Spring protests, and, more closely related, protests in Chile, Greece, Spain and India.
There were demonstrations in co-ordination with the Occupy Wall Street movement on 15 October.

Prefigurative politics

new society within the shell of the oldprefigurativenew society [built] within the shell of the old
David Graeber has argued that the Occupy movement, in its anti-hierarchical and anti-authoritarian consensus-based politics, its refusal to accept the legitimacy of the existing legal and political order, and its embrace of prefigurative politics, has roots in an anarchist political tradition.
The occupation movements of 2011 in Egypt and the Arab world, in Spain, and in the United States embodied elements of prefiguration (explicitly in the case of Occupy Wall Street and its spinoffs in occupations around the United States). They envisaged creating a public space in the middle of American cities, for political dialogue and achieved some of the attributes of community in providing free food, libraries, medical care, and a place to sleep.

Occupy movement

OccupyOccupy Wall Street movementoccupation
David Graeber has argued that the Occupy movement, in its anti-hierarchical and anti-authoritarian consensus-based politics, its refusal to accept the legitimacy of the existing legal and political order, and its embrace of prefigurative politics, has roots in an anarchist political tradition. The Occupy protesters' slogan "We are the 99%" referred to the protester's perceptions of, and attitudes regarding, income disparity in the US and economic inequality in general, which were main issues for OWS.
The first Occupy protest to receive widespread attention, Occupy Wall Street in New York City's Zuccotti Park, began on 17 September 2011.

List of political slogans

political slogancampaign slogancampaign slogans
The Occupy protesters' slogan "We are the 99%" referred to the protester's perceptions of, and attitudes regarding, income disparity in the US and economic inequality in general, which were main issues for OWS.
We are the 99% – a solidarity internet meme commonly associated with the 2011 Occupy Wall Street and associated protests

Judith Butler

ButlerButler, JudithButlerian
In a similar vein, scholar and activist Judith Butler challenged the assertion that OWS should make concrete demands: "So what are the demands that all these people are making? Either they say there are no demands and that leaves your critics confused. Or they say that demands for social equality, that demands for economic justice are impossible demands and impossible demands are just not practical. But we disagree. If hope is an impossible demand then we demand the impossible."
In October 2011, Butler attended Occupy Wall Street and, in reference to calls for clarification of the protesters' demands, she said:

N+1

n + 1n+1 magazineN+1 online
Gazette' was founded by editors Astra Taylor, Keith Gessen of N+1 and Sarah Leonard of Dissent Magazine. It published five issues from October 2011 to September 2012, with a commemorative sixth issue published in May 2014, to support OWS activist Cecily McMillan during the sentencing phase of her trial.
Taylor, Greif, Gessen, and others contributed segments entitled “Scenes from an Occupation,” which reported the day-to-day conditions at Occupy Wall Street; “Scenes from Occupied Atlanta” and “Scenes from Occupied Boston”, among others, reported from their respective locations around the country.