Oda Nobunaga

Nobunaga OdaNobunagaGenma LordOda "Demon King" NobunagaOda Nobu'''nagaTaira no Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga was a powerful daimyō (feudal lord) of Japan in the late 16th century who attempted to unify Japan during the late Sengoku period, and successfully gained control over most of Honshu.wikipedia
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Akechi Mitsuhide

Mitsuhide AkechiAkechi [MitsuhideMitsuhide
He was killed when his retainer Akechi Mitsuhide rebelled against him at Honnō-ji.
Mitsuhide was a general under daimyō Oda Nobunaga, who then became famous for his rebellion against Nobunaga in 1582, which led to Nobunaga's death at Honnō-ji.

Honnō-ji Incident

Honnō-jiincident at Honnō-jiassassinated
He was killed when his retainer Akechi Mitsuhide rebelled against him at Honnō-ji.
The Honnō-ji Incident refers to the forced suicide on June 21, 1582, of Japanese daimyō Oda Nobunaga at the hands of his samurai general Akechi Mitsuhide.

Oda clan

Oda
Although Nobunaga was Nobuhide's legitimate heir, some of the Oda clan were divided against him.
Though they had the climax of their fame under Oda Nobunaga and fell from the spotlight soon after, several branches of the family continued as daimyō houses until the Meiji Restoration.

Muromachi period

Japan (Muromachi period)MuromachiJapan (Muromach period)
The goal of national unification and a return to the comparative political stability of the earlier Muromachi period was widely shared by the multitude of autonomous daimyōs during the Sengoku period.
The period ended in 1573 when the 15th and last shogun of this line, Ashikaga Yoshiaki, was driven out of the capital in Kyoto by Oda Nobunaga.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
Oda Nobunaga was a powerful daimyō (feudal lord) of Japan in the late 16th century who attempted to unify Japan during the late Sengoku period, and successfully gained control over most of Honshu.
This allowed Oda Nobunaga to obtain European technology and firearms, which he used to conquer many other daimyōs.

Oda Nobuhide

NobuhideNobuhide Oda
He was the second son of Oda Nobuhide, a deputy shugo (military governor) with land holdings in Owari Province.
His father was Oda Nobusada and Nobuhide was the father of Oda Nobunaga.

Oda Nobuyuki

Nobuyuki
Collecting about a thousand men, Nobunaga suppressed those members of his family who were hostile to his rule, including his younger brother, Oda Nobuyuki.
Oda Nobuyuki, also known as Oda Nobukatsu, was the son of Oda Nobuhide and younger brother of Oda Nobunaga, who lived during the Sengoku period of Japan.

Ashikaga shogunate

AshikagaAshikaga shōgunShōgun
In 1560, Imagawa Yoshimoto gathered an army of 25,000 men and started his march toward Kyoto, with the pretext of aiding the frail Ashikaga shogunate.
The Ashikaga shogunate, also known as the Muromachi shogunate, was a dynasty originating from one of the plethora of Japanese daimyō which governed Japan from 1338 to 1573, the year in which Oda Nobunaga deposed Ashikaga Yoshiaki.

Sengoku period

Japan (Sengoku period)SengokuWarring States period
Oda Nobunaga was a powerful daimyō (feudal lord) of Japan in the late 16th century who attempted to unify Japan during the late Sengoku period, and successfully gained control over most of Honshu.
The period culminated with a series of three warlords, Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu, who gradually unified Japan.

Nagoya Castle

Nagoya
He is said to have been born in Nagoya Castle, although this is subject to debate.
His son, Oda Nobunaga, was supposedly born there in 1534 (Tenbun 3), although this is subject to debate.

Tokugawa Ieyasu

Ieyasu TokugawaIeyasuTokugawa
Nobunaga is regarded as one of three unifiers of Japan along with his retainers Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu. Nobunaga's successful subjugation of much of Honshu enabled the later successes of his allies Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu toward the goal of national unification by subjugating local daimyōs under a hereditary shogunate, which was ultimately accomplished in 1603 when Ieyasu was granted the title of shōgun by Emperor Go-Yōzei following the successful Sekigahara Campaign of 1600.
He was one of the three unifiers of Japan, along with his former lord Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi.

Kiyosu Castle

Then in 1556, he destroyed a rival branch located in Kiyosu Castle.
It is noted for its association with the rise to power of the Sengoku period warlord, Oda Nobunaga.

Siege of Inabayama Castle

attacked Inabayama Castleattacked Mino Provinceattacks Saitō Tatsuoki's castle
By convincing Saitō retainers to abandon their incompetent and foolish master, Nobunaga weakened the Saitō clan significantly, eventually mounting a final attack in 1567 when he captured Inabayama Castle.
The Siege of Inabayama Castle of 1567 was the final battle in Oda Nobunaga's campaign to defeat the Saitō clan in their mountaintop castle and conquer Mino Province, Japan.

Imagawa Yoshimoto

Yoshimoto ImagawaImagawaYoshimoto
In 1560, Imagawa Yoshimoto gathered an army of 25,000 men and started his march toward Kyoto, with the pretext of aiding the frail Ashikaga shogunate.
He was killed in the village of Dengakuhazama in Okehazama by Oda Nobunaga.

Gifu

Gifu CityGifu City, JapanGifu MEA
After taking possession of the castle, Nobunaga changed the name of both the castle and the surrounding town to Gifu.
During the Sengoku period, various warlords, including Oda Nobunaga, used the area as a base in an attempt to unify and control Japan.

Matsudaira clan

MatsudairaMatsudaira (Hisamatsu) clanMatsudaira (Matsui) clan
The Matsudaira clan of Mikawa Province also joined Yoshimoto's forces.
After the death of Imagawa Yoshimoto and the fall from power of the Imagawa clan, Hirotada's son Matsudaira Motoyasu was successful in forming an alliance with Oda Nobunaga, the hegemon of Owari Province.

Oichi

Ichi-himeIchi Hime (市姫)Ichihime
A similar relationship was forged when Nobunaga's sister Oichi married Azai Nagamasa of Ōmi Province.
Oichi was the younger sister of Oda Nobunaga; and she was the sister-in-law of Nōhime, the daughter of Saitō Dōsan.

Mino Province

MinoMino no kuniNōshū
Although Nobuyuki and his supporters were still at large, Nobunaga took an army to Mino Province to aid Saitō Dōsan after Dōsan's son, Saitō Yoshitatsu, turned against him.
During the Kamakura and Muromachi Period, Mino Province was governed by the Toki clan and later in Azuchi period controlled by Oda Nobunaga.

Azai Nagamasa

Nagamasa AzaiNagamasa
A similar relationship was forged when Nobunaga's sister Oichi married Azai Nagamasa of Ōmi Province.
He was the brother-in-law of Oda Nobunaga, starting in 1564, and one of Nobunaga's enemies from 1570 to 1573.

Tanegashima (gun)

tanegashimatanegashima (Japanese matchlock)(''tanegashima'')
With the introduction of firearms into Japan, however, he became known for his fondness of tanegashima firearms.
In 1549, Oda Nobunaga ordered 500 guns to be produced for his armies at a time when the benefits of firearms over traditional weapons were still relatively questionable to other daimyō.

Sieges of Nagashima

First Siege of NagashimaNagashimalay siege to the Ikki's fortress three times
The siege finally ended when Nobunaga surrounded the enemy complex and set fire to it, killing tens of thousands.
The Sieges of Nagashima, taking place in 1571, 1573 and 1574, were part of Oda Nobunaga's campaigns against the Ikkō-ikki, arguably among his greatest enemies.

Battle of Sekigahara

SekigaharaSekigahara CampaignBattle at Sekigahara
Nobunaga's successful subjugation of much of Honshu enabled the later successes of his allies Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu toward the goal of national unification by subjugating local daimyōs under a hereditary shogunate, which was ultimately accomplished in 1603 when Ieyasu was granted the title of shōgun by Emperor Go-Yōzei following the successful Sekigahara Campaign of 1600.
Oda Nobunaga had slowly consolidated control over much of Japan and was in control of the Shōgun, Ashikaga Yoshiaki.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi

Hashiba HideyoshiHideyoshiHideyoshi Toyotomi
Nobunaga is regarded as one of three unifiers of Japan along with his retainers Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu.
He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Warring Lords period.

Tendai

Tendai BuddhismTendai SchoolTendai sect
The Enryaku-ji monastery on Mt. Hiei, with its sōhei (warrior monks) of the Tendai school who aided the anti-Nobunaga group by helping Azai-Asakura alliance, was an issue for Nobunaga since the monastery was so close to his base of power.
Destruction of the head temple Mount Hiei by warlord Oda Nobunaga further weakened Tendai's influence as well as the geographic shift of Japan's capital to Edo away from Kyoto.

Owari Province

OwariOwari region(W)owari
He was the second son of Oda Nobuhide, a deputy shugo (military governor) with land holdings in Owari Province.
Under Oda Nobunaga, the province was reunified.