Odessa

OdesaOdessa, UkraineOdessa, RussiaOdessa City CouncilOdessa, USSRCity of OdesaCity of OdessahistoryHocabeyhometown
Odessa or Odesa is the third most populous city of Ukraine and a major tourism center, seaport and transport hub located on the northwestern shore of the Black Sea.wikipedia
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Odessa Oblast

OdessaOdesa OblastOdessa region
It is also the administrative center of the Odessa Oblast and a multiethnic cultural center.
Its administrative center is the city of Odessa .

Black Sea

BlackEuxinePontus Euxinus
Odessa or Odesa is the third most populous city of Ukraine and a major tourism center, seaport and transport hub located on the northwestern shore of the Black Sea.
Important cities along the coast include Odessa, Sevastopol, Samsun, and Istanbul.

Port of Odessa

OdessaContainer Terminal OdessaOdessa port
The city of Odessa hosts both the Port of Odessa and Port Yuzhne, a significant oil terminal situated in the city's suburbs.
The Port of Odessa or Odessa Sea Port (Одеський морський порт, Odes'kyi morskyi port) — located near Odessa — is the largest Ukrainian seaport and one of the largest ports in the Black Sea basin, with a total annual traffic capacity of 40 million tonnes (15 million tonnes dry bulk and 25 million tonnes liquid bulk).

Derybasivska Street

Deribasivska StreetDeribasovskayaDeribasovskaya Street
One section of the troops came under command of a Spaniard in Russian service, Major General José de Ribas (known in Russia as Osip Mikhailovich Deribas); today, the main street in Odessa, Deribasivska Street, is named after him.
Vulytsia Derybasivska (Дерібасiвська) or ulitsa Deribasovskaya or De Ribas Street is a pedestrian walkway (street) in the heart of Odessa, Ukraine.

Moldavanka

MoldovankaMoldavanka districtMoldovanca
However, adjacent to the new official locality, a Moldavian colony already existed, which by the end of the 18th century was an independent settlement named Moldavanka.
Moldavanka is a historical part of Odessa in the Odessa Oblast (province) of southern Ukraine, located jointly in Malinovskiy and Primorskiy city districts.

Saint Petersburg

St. PetersburgLeningradSt Petersburg
During the 19th century, Odessa was the fourth largest city of Imperial Russia, after Moscow, Saint Petersburg and Warsaw.
20, named Leningrad, alongside Stalingrad, Sevastopol, and Odessa, hero cities of the war.

Khadjibey

KhadzhibeyHadjibeyHacıbey
The site of present-day Odessa was then a fortress known as Khadjibey (named for Hacı I Giray, and also spelled Kocibey in English, Hacıbey or Hocabey in Turkish, and Hacıbey in Crimean Tatar).
Khadjibey (Hacıbey) was a fortress and a haven by the Gulf of Odessa, in the location of the modern city of Odessa, Ukraine.

Pipeline transport

pipelinepipelinesoil pipeline
Odessa's oil and chemical processing facilities are connected to Russian and European networks by strategic pipelines.
A major ammonia pipeline is the Ukrainian Transammiak line connecting the TogliattiAzot facility in Russia to the exporting Black Sea-port of Odessa.

Odessa Film Studio

Odesa Film StudioOdessa Cinema StudioOdessa Film Studios
The film was made at Odessa's Cinema Factory, one of the oldest cinema studios in the former Soviet Union.
Odessa Film Studio is the first film studio established in Russian Empire (Odessa).

José de Ribas

Jose de RibasAdmiral de RibasDe Ribas
One section of the troops came under command of a Spaniard in Russian service, Major General José de Ribas (known in Russia as Osip Mikhailovich Deribas); today, the main street in Odessa, Deribasivska Street, is named after him.
After Empress Catherine took advantage of Potocki's successful international trading post of the Polish Black Sea Trading Company, in Russian-ruled Kherson, she founded Odessa.

Greek colonisation

Greek coloniesGreek colonycolony
Odessa was the site of a large Greek settlement no later than the middle of the 6th century BC (a necropolis from the 5th–3rd centuries BC has long been known in this area).
The colonies of Miletus in this region of the Black Sea were Pontic Olbia and Panticapaeum (modern Kerch.) Later in the 6th century B.C. the Milesians founded Odessa in the region of modern Ukraine.

Odessa pogroms

Odessa pogromOdessaPogrom
Pogroms were carried out in 1821, 1859, 1871, 1881 and 1905.
A series of pogroms against Jews in the city of Odessa, then part of the Russian Empire, took place during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Siege of Odessa (1941)

Siege of OdessaOdessaBattle of Odessa
The defense of Odessa lasted 73 days from 5 August to 16 October 1941. Following the Siege of Odessa, and the Axis occupation, approximately 25,000 Odessans were murdered in the outskirts of the city and over 35,000 deported; this came to be known as the Odessa massacre.
Odessa was a port on the Black Sea in the Ukrainian SSR.

1941 Odessa massacre

Odessa massacremassacre that followedOdessa
Following the Siege of Odessa, and the Axis occupation, approximately 25,000 Odessans were murdered in the outskirts of the city and over 35,000 deported; this came to be known as the Odessa massacre.
The Odessa massacre is the name given to the mass murder of the Jewish population of Odessa and surrounding towns in the Transnistria Governorate during the autumn of 1941 and the winter of 1942 while it was under Romanian control.

Pogrom

pogromsanti-Jewish riotsList of events named pogrom
Pogroms were carried out in 1821, 1859, 1871, 1881 and 1905.
The 1821 Odessa pogroms marked the beginning of the 19th century pogroms in Tsarist Russia; there were four more such pogroms in Odessa before the end of the century.

Alexander Pushkin

PushkinAleksandr PushkinAlexandr Pushkin
Its cosmopolitan nature was documented by the great Russian poet Alexander Pushkin, who lived in internal exile in Odessa between 1823 and 1824.
In 1823, Pushkin moved to Odessa, where he again clashed with the government, which sent him into exile on his mother's rural estate of Mikhailovskoye (near Pskov) from 1824 to 1826.

Tiraspol

TyraspolTiraspol, Transnistria
With the establishment of the Voznesensk Governorate on 27 January 1795, the Vorstadt was named Tiraspol.
The customs house was subordinated to the chief of the Odessa customs region.

Greek Plan

Greek Projectillustrious future intended for Alexanderincreasingly drawn towards the south
The city was named in compliance with the Greek Plan of Catherine the Great.
The Greek Plan was masterminded by Prince Potemkin who gave Greek names to the newly founded towns in New Russia (e.g., Odessa and Kherson).

2014 Odessa clashes

2 May 2014 Odessa clashesOdessafire of 2 May
The city has seen violence in the 2014 pro-Russian conflict in Ukraine during 2014 Odessa clashes.
Clashes between Euromaidan and anti-Maidan demonstrators erupted in the southern Ukrainian port city of Odessa during January 2014, during the lead-up to the late February revolution.

Gazaria (Genoese colonies)

GazariaGenoese GazariaCrimea
On Italian navigational maps of 14th century on the place of Odessa is indicated the castle of Ginestra (more Gazaria (Genoese colonies)).
Aside of Crimea, Genoa possessed several castles on the western coast of Black Sea such as the castle of Maurocastro (Bilhorod-Dnistrovsky) in the estuary of Dniester, the castle of Ginestra near Odessa, the castle of Licostomo (Kiliya), the colony of Constanca, the colony of Caladda (upstream of Danube).

2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine

2014 pro-Russian conflict in Ukrainepro-Russian separatistspolitical unrest
The city has seen violence in the 2014 pro-Russian conflict in Ukraine during 2014 Odessa clashes.
From late 2014, cities outside of the Donbass combat zone, such as Kharkiv, Odessa, Kiev and Mariupol, were struck by bombings that targeted pro-Ukrainian unity organizations.

Transnistria Governorate

Transnistriaoccupied TransnistriaTransnistrian air section
During World War II, from 1941–1944, Odessa was subject to Romanian administration, as the city had been made part of Transnistria.
Limited in the west by the Dniester river (separating it from Bessarabia), in the east by the Southern Bug river (separating it from the German Reichskommissariat Ukraine), and in the south by the Black Sea, it comprised the present-day region of Transnistria (which compared to the World War II whole is only a small strip along the bank of the Dniester) and territories further east (modern Odessa Oblast eastward of the Dniester and southern Vinnytsia Oblast), including the Black Sea port of Odessa, which became the administrative capital of Transnistria during World War II.

Yuzhne

YuzhnyYuzhny, UkraineDvorets Sporta
The city of Odessa hosts both the Port of Odessa and Port Yuzhne, a significant oil terminal situated in the city's suburbs.
The city's port is an internationally important oil terminal, and one of Ukraine's top three ports, with Odessa and Chornomorsk.

Catherine the Great

Catherine IICatherine II of RussiaEmpress Catherine II
In 1794, the city of Odessa was founded by a decree of the Russian empress Catherine the Great.
The Russian victories procured access to the Black Sea and allowed Catherine's government to incorporate present-day southern Ukraine, where the Russians founded the new cities of Odessa, Nikolayev, Yekaterinoslav (literally: "the Glory of Catherine"; the future Dnipro), and Kherson.

Odessa Catacombs

city's catacombscatacombsOdessa
Partisan fighting continued, however, in the city's catacombs.
The Odessa Catacombs are a labyrinth-like network of tunnels (subterranean cavities) located under the city of Odessa and its outskirts in Ukraine, that are mostly (over 90%) the result of stone mining, particularly coquina.