Odoacer

Kingdom of ItalyKingdom of OdoacerOdoacer's Kingdomaround 476AudochariBattle of Placentiaking of Italykingdomruler of Italy
Flavius Odoacer (c. 433 – 493 AD), also known as Flavius Odovacer or Odovacar (Odoacre, Odoacer, Odoacar, Odovacar, Odovacris), was a barbarian statesman of uncertain ethnic origin who in 476 became the first King of Italy (476–493).wikipedia
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Italy

🇮🇹ItalianITA
Though the real power in Italy was in his hands, he represented himself as the client of the emperor in Constantinople.
In a slow decline since the third century AD, the Empire split in two in 395 AD. The Western Empire, under the pressure of the barbarian invasions, eventually dissolved in 476 AD, when its last Emperor Romulus Augustulus was deposed by the Germanic chief Odoacer, while the Eastern half of the Empire survived for another thousand years.

Ostrogoths

OstrogothicOstrogothGothic
Zeno also appointed the Ostrogoth Theoderic the Great who was menacing the borders of the Eastern Empire, to be king of Italy, turning one troublesome, nominal vassal against another.
During the late 5th and 6th centuries, under Theodoric the Great most of the Ostrogoths moved first to Moesia (c. 475–488) and later conquered the Kingdom of Italy of the Germanic warrior Odoacer.

Ravenna

Ravenna, ItalySavio(RA)
Theoderic invaded Italy in 489 and by August 490 had captured almost the entire peninsula, forcing Odoacer to take refuge in Ravenna.
The late 5th century saw the dissolution of Roman authority in the west, and the last person to hold the title of emperor in the West was deposed in 476 by the general Odoacer.

Turcilingi

In his Getica, Jordanes describes Odoacer as king of the Turcilingi (Turc-ilingi or Torcilingorum rex). However, in his Romana, the same author defines him as a member of the Rugii (Odoacer genere Rogus). The Consularia Italica calls him king of the Heruli, while Theophanes appears to be guessing when he calls him a Goth.
Their only known leader was Odoacer (Odovacar).

Herules

HerulsHerulianHeruli
In his Getica, Jordanes describes Odoacer as king of the Turcilingi (Turc-ilingi or Torcilingorum rex). However, in his Romana, the same author defines him as a member of the Rugii (Odoacer genere Rogus). The Consularia Italica calls him king of the Heruli, while Theophanes appears to be guessing when he calls him a Goth. Probably of Scirian descent, Odoacer was a military leader in Italy who led the revolt of Herulian, Rugian, and Scirian soldiers that deposed Romulus Augustulus on 4 September AD 476. Although Jordanes writes of Odoacer as invading Italy "as leader of the Sciri, the Heruli and allies of various races", modern writers describe him as being part of the Roman military establishment, based on John of Antioch's statement that Odoacer was on the side of Ricimer at the beginning of his battle with the emperor Anthemius in 472.
They established their own kingdom and many joined Odoacer, who deposed the last Western Roman Emperor Romulus Augustus in 476 AD. They became well known both as soldiers in various Roman armies, in the Italian kingdom of Odoacer, and as sea raiders on the Atlantic coast, before fading out of history.

Ricimer

Flavius Ricimer
Although Jordanes writes of Odoacer as invading Italy "as leader of the Sciri, the Heruli and allies of various races", modern writers describe him as being part of the Roman military establishment, based on John of Antioch's statement that Odoacer was on the side of Ricimer at the beginning of his battle with the emperor Anthemius in 472.
Ricimer's military office and his dominance over the empire led historians such as J. B. Bury to conclude that he was a link between previous magistri militum, such as the Vandal Stilicho, and the Germanic King of Italy, Odoacer.

Edeko

EdecoEdeko, Edica, Edika
Both the Anonymus Valesianus and John of Antioch state his father's name was Edeko (Edika).
Idikon or Edico, the father of Odoacer, who became a magister militum in the Roman Army and the first King of Italy (476–493).

Julius Nepos

Nepos
With the backing of the Roman Senate, Odoacer thenceforth ruled Italy autonomously, paying lip service to the authority of Julius Nepos, the previous Western emperor, and Zeno, the emperor of the East.
Orestes crowned his son, Romulus Augustulus, as emperor but they were soon deposed by Odoacer.

Thuringii

ThuringianThuringianscollapse of the Thuringian kingdoms
Subsequently, while reviewing the primary sources in 1983, Bruce Macbain proposed that while his mother might have been Scirian and his father Thuringian, in any case he was not a Hun.
They are specifically associated with Odoacer, who later became King of Italy, and are sometimes thought to be a part of the Scirii.

Audovacar

Other sources believe the name Odoacer is derived from the Germanic Audawakrs, from aud- "wealth" and wakr- "vigilant".
The name is recorded as Odoacer as borne by a Gothic leader in the 5th century.

King of Italy

KingKings of ItalyItaly
Flavius Odoacer (c. 433 – 493 AD), also known as Flavius Odovacer or Odovacar (Odoacre, Odoacer, Odoacar, Odovacar, Odovacris), was a barbarian statesman of uncertain ethnic origin who in 476 became the first King of Italy (476–493).
The first to take the title was Odoacer, a "barbarian" military leader, in the late 5th century, followed by the Ostrogothic kings up to the mid-6th century.

Goths

GothicgothDeewan Lal Chand
In his Getica, Jordanes describes Odoacer as king of the Turcilingi (Turc-ilingi or Torcilingorum rex). However, in his Romana, the same author defines him as a member of the Rugii (Odoacer genere Rogus). The Consularia Italica calls him king of the Heruli, while Theophanes appears to be guessing when he calls him a Goth.
At the request of emperor Zeno, Theoderic conquered all of Italy from the Scirian Odoacer beginning in 488.

Severinus of Noricum

Saint Severinus of NoricumSeverinusSaint Severinus
Odoacer, at the time "a young man, of tall figure, clad in poor clothes", learned from Severinus that he would one day become famous.
His efforts seem to have won him wide respect, including that of the Germanic chieftain Odoacer.

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineByzantinesEastern Roman Empire
After the fall of Attila, the Eastern Empire enjoyed a period of peace, while the Western Empire deteriorated due to continuing migration and expansion by the Germanic nations (its end is usually dated in 476 when the Germanic Roman general Odoacer deposed the usurper Western Emperor Romulus Augustulus ).

Fall of Ravenna

Battle of RavennacapturingRavenna fell
The Fall of Ravenna, capital of the Western Roman Empire, occurred in early September 476 after a minor confrontation between the Heruli under their King Odoacer and the remnants of the Western Roman Army in Italy.

Anonymus Valesianus

Anonymi valesianiExcerpta Valesianafragmentary contemporary chronicle
Both the Anonymus Valesianus and John of Antioch state his father's name was Edeko (Edika).
The Pars Posterior consists of 60 chapters and it presents the chain of events as a chronicle from Chapter 36 to 59: from the rule of Emperor Zeno, through the decline of the power of Odoacer, up to the succession of Theodoric the Great in 493.

Caecina Decius Maximus Basilius

BasiliusCaecina Decius Maximus Basilus
He regularly nominated members of the Senate to the Consulate and other prestigious offices: "Basilius, Decius, Venantius, and Manlius Boethius held the consulship and were either Prefects of Rome or Praetorian Prefects; Symmachus and Sividius were consuls and Prefects of Rome; another senator of old family, Cassiodorus, was appointed a minister of finance."
He was the first consul appointed under Odoacer's rule (480), and afterwards was Praetorian prefect of Italy.

Caecina Mavortius Basilius Decius

Decius
He regularly nominated members of the Senate to the Consulate and other prestigious offices: "Basilius, Decius, Venantius, and Manlius Boethius held the consulship and were either Prefects of Rome or Praetorian Prefects; Symmachus and Sividius were consuls and Prefects of Rome; another senator of old family, Cassiodorus, was appointed a minister of finance."
Caecina Mavortius Basilius Decius (floruit 486-510) was a Roman politician under Odoacer's rule.

Theoderic the Great

TheodoricTheodericTheodoric the Great
Zeno also appointed the Ostrogoth Theoderic the Great who was menacing the borders of the Eastern Empire, to be king of Italy, turning one troublesome, nominal vassal against another.
In 488, Emperor Zeno ordered Theoderic to overthrow the Germanic foederatus and King of Italy, Odoacer.

Arianism

ArianAriansArian Christianity
Although Odoacer was an Arian Christian, he rarely intervened in the affairs of the orthodox and trinitarian state church of the Roman Empire.
The Roman Emperors Constantius II (337–361) and Valens (364–378) were Arians or Semi-Arians, as was the first King of Italy, Odoacer (433?–493), and the Lombards were also Arians or Semi-Arians until the 7th century.

Childeric I

ChildericChilderic I, King of the Salian FranksChilderick
Two chapters of his work recount, in a confused or confusing manner, a number of battles fought by King Childeric I of the Franks, Aegidius, Count Paul, and one "Adovacrius" or "Odovacrius".
Childeric and Paul fought Saxons under the command of a leader named "Adovacrius" (sometimes given by modern authors in either an Anglo-Saxon spelling form, Eadwacer, or in a spelling the same as used for his contemporary the future King of Italy Odoacer, with whom he is sometimes equated).

Decius Marius Venantius Basilius

Venantius
He regularly nominated members of the Senate to the Consulate and other prestigious offices: "Basilius, Decius, Venantius, and Manlius Boethius held the consulship and were either Prefects of Rome or Praetorian Prefects; Symmachus and Sividius were consuls and Prefects of Rome; another senator of old family, Cassiodorus, was appointed a minister of finance." He himself used it in the only surviving official document that emanated from his chancery, and it was also used by the consul Basilius.
Decius Marius Venantius Basilius (floruit 484) was a Roman official under Odoacer's rule.

Scirii

ScirianSciriScirians
Probably of Scirian descent, Odoacer was a military leader in Italy who led the revolt of Herulian, Rugian, and Scirian soldiers that deposed Romulus Augustulus on 4 September AD 476. However, it is unclear whether this Edeko is identical to one—or both—men of the same name who lived at this time: one was an ambassador of Attila to the court in Constantinople, and escorted Priscus and other Imperial dignitaries back to Attila's camp; the other, according to Jordanes, is mentioned with Hunulfus as chieftains of the Scirii, who were soundly defeated by the Ostrogoths at the Battle of Bolia in Pannonia about 469.
According to Jordanes, about 476 CE the first king of Italy Odoacer, a Torcilingi, possibly related to the Sciri, led the remains of the anti-Ostragoth confederation into Italy, including among them some of the Sciri, the Heruli, and the Rugians.

Zeno (emperor)

ZenoEmperor ZenoFlavius Zeno
Odoacer generally used the Roman honorific patrician, granted by the emperor Zeno, but is referred to as a king (rex) in many documents.
One year later, while Zeno was entering Constantinople to end Basiliscus' brief usurpation, Romulus and Orestes were overthrown by the Chieftain Odoacer.

Attila

Attila the HunEtzelAtli
However, it is unclear whether this Edeko is identical to one—or both—men of the same name who lived at this time: one was an ambassador of Attila to the court in Constantinople, and escorted Priscus and other Imperial dignitaries back to Attila's camp; the other, according to Jordanes, is mentioned with Hunulfus as chieftains of the Scirii, who were soundly defeated by the Ostrogoths at the Battle of Bolia in Pannonia about 469.
Odoacer