Oghuz Turks

TurkmenOghuzTurkmensTurkomanOghuz TurkOghuz TurkicTurcomanGhuzzOguzOuzes
The Oghuz, Oguz or Ghuzz Turks were western Turkic people who spoke the Oghuz languages from the Common branch of the Turkic language family.wikipedia
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Oghuz Yabgu State

Oghuz YabguOghuzOghuz tribal federation
In the 8th century, they formed a tribal confederation conventionally named the Oghuz Yabgu State in central Asia.
The Oguz Yabgu State (Oguz il, meaning Oguz Land, Oguz Country, 750–1055) was a Turkic state, founded by Oghuz Turks in 766, located geographically in an area between the coasts of the Caspian and Aral Seas.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
The founders of the Ottoman Empire were descendants of the Oghuzes.
It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman I.

Turkmenistan

TurkmenTurkmeniaRepublic of Turkmenistan
Today, a percentage of the residents of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan are descendants of Oghuz Turks and their language belongs to the Oghuz (also known as southwestern Turkic) group of the Turkic languages family.
In the 8th century AD, Turkic-speaking Oghuz tribes moved from Mongolia into present-day Central Asia.

Azerbaijan

Republic of AzerbaijanAzerbaijan RepublicAZE
Today, a percentage of the residents of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan are descendants of Oghuz Turks and their language belongs to the Oghuz (also known as southwestern Turkic) group of the Turkic languages family.
At the beginning of the 11th century, the territory was gradually seized by waves of Oghuz Turks from Central Asia.

Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
Today, a percentage of the residents of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan are descendants of Oghuz Turks and their language belongs to the Oghuz (also known as southwestern Turkic) group of the Turkic languages family.
The House of Seljuk was a branch of the Kınık Oğuz Turks who resided on the periphery of the Muslim world, in the Yabgu Khaganate of the Oğuz confederacy, to the north of the Caspian and Aral Seas, in the 9th century.

Oghuz languages

OghuzOghuz TurkicOguz
Today, a percentage of the residents of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan are descendants of Oghuz Turks and their language belongs to the Oghuz (also known as southwestern Turkic) group of the Turkic languages family. The Oghuz, Oguz or Ghuzz Turks were western Turkic people who spoke the Oghuz languages from the Common branch of the Turkic language family.
It is in reference to the Oghuz Turks, who migrated from the Altai Mountains to Central Asia in the 8th century and further expanded to the Middle East and to the Balkans as separate tribes.

Turkic peoples

TurkicTurksTurkish
The Oghuz, Oguz or Ghuzz Turks were western Turkic people who spoke the Oghuz languages from the Common branch of the Turkic language family.
The Pechenegs, three of whose tribes were known as Kangar (Greek: Καγγαρ), after being defeated by the Oghuzes, Karluks, and Kimek-Kypchaks, attacked the Bulgars and established the Pecheneg state in Eastern Europe (840–990 CE).

Book of Dede Korkut

Dede KorkutThe Book of Dede KorkutDede Gorgud
The Book of Dede Korkut, a historical epic of the Oghuz, contains historical echoes of the 9th and 10th centuries but was likely written several centuries later. Oghuz Turkish literature includes the famous Book of Dede Korkut which was UNESCO's 2000 literary work of the year, as well as the Oghuzname, Battalname, Danishmendname, Köroğlu epics which are part of the literary history of Azerbaijanis, Turks of Turkey and Turkmens.
The Book of Dede Korkut or Book of Korkut Ata (Dede Korkut or Korkut Ata; Dədə Qorqud, دده قورقود; Gorkut Ata) is the most famous among the epic stories of the Oghuz Turks.

Azerbaijani literature

AzerbaijaniliteratureLiterature of Azerbaijan
The modern and classical literature of Azerbaijan, Turkey and Central Asia are also considered Oghuz literature, since it was produced by their descendants.
The first examples of Azerbaijani literature date to the late 1200s following the arrival of Oghuz Turks in Caucasus and were written in Perso-Arabic script.

Turkish literature

TurkishliteratureOttoman literature
The modern and classical literature of Azerbaijan, Turkey and Central Asia are also considered Oghuz literature, since it was produced by their descendants.
Subsequent to this period, between the 9th and 11th centuries, there arose among the nomadic Turkic peoples of Central Asia a tradition of oral epics, such as the Book of Dede Korkut of the Oghuz Turks—the linguistic and cultural ancestors of the modern Turkish people—and the Manas epic of the Kyrgyz people.

Indo-European migrations

Indo-EuropeanIndo-European expansionIndo-Europeans
During the 2nd century BC, according to ancient Chinese sources, a steppe tribal confederation known as the Xiongnu and their allies, the Wusun (probably an Indo-European people) defeated the neighboring Yuezhi and drove them out of western China and into Central Asia.
The lands of the Anatolian peoples were successively invaded by a number of peoples and empires at high frequency: the Phrygians, Bithynians, the Medes, the Persians, the Greeks, the Galatian Celts, Romans and the Oghuz Turks.

Oghuz Khagan

Oghuz KhanOguz Khanlegend of Oghuz Qaghan
Oghuz Turkish literature includes the famous Book of Dede Korkut which was UNESCO's 2000 literary work of the year, as well as the Oghuzname, Battalname, Danishmendname, Köroğlu epics which are part of the literary history of Azerbaijanis, Turks of Turkey and Turkmens.
Some Turkic cultures use this legend to describe their ethnic origins and the origin of the system of political clans used by Turkmen, Ottoman, and other Oghuz Turks.

Seljuq dynasty

Seljuk TurksSeljukSeljuks
A clan of this nation, the Seljuks, embraced Islam and in the 11th century entered Persia, where they founded the Great Seljuk Empire.
The Seljuq dynasty, or Seljuqs ( Al-e Saljuq), was an Oghuz Turk Sunni Muslim dynasty that gradually became a Persianate society and contributed to the Turco-Persian tradition in the medieval West and Central Asia.

Epic of Koroghlu

Epic of KöroğluKöroğluKoroghlu
Oghuz Turkish literature includes the famous Book of Dede Korkut which was UNESCO's 2000 literary work of the year, as well as the Oghuzname, Battalname, Danishmendname, Köroğlu epics which are part of the literary history of Azerbaijanis, Turks of Turkey and Turkmens.
Due to the migration in the Middle Ages of large groups of Oghuz Turks within Central Asia, South Caucasus and Asia Minor, and their subsequent assimilation with other ethnic groups, Epic of Koroghlu spread widely in these geographical regions leading to emergence of its Turkmen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Tajik, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Crimean Tatar, Georgian and Kurdish versions.

Kimek tribe

KimekKimeksKimaks
According to the book Attila and the Nomad Hordes, "Like the Kimaks they set up many carved wooden funerary statues surrounded by simple stone balbal monoliths."
Later, an expanded Kimek Kaganate partially controlled the territories of the Oguz, Kangly, and Bagjanak tribes, and in the west bordered the Khazar and Bulgar territories.

Ottoman dynasty

OttomanSultanHouse of Osman
According to Ottoman tradition, the family originated from the Kayı tribe branch of the Oghuz Turks, under Osman I in northwestern Anatolia in the district of Bilecik Söğüt.

Abbasid Caliphate

AbbasidAbbasidsAbbasid dynasty
For example, during the period of the Abbasid caliph Al-Ma'mun (813–833), the name Oghuz starts to appear in the works of Islamic writers.
With the Buyid dynasty on the wane, a vacuum was created that was eventually filled by the dynasty of Oghuz Turks known as the Seljuqs.

Anatolian beyliks

beylikAnatolian beylikbeyliks
Following the 1071 Seljuq victory over the Byzantine Empire at the Battle of Manzikert and the subsequent conquest of Anatolia, Oghuz clans began settling in present-day Turkey.

Karluks

KarlukQarluqKarluk Turks
By 780, the eastern parts of the Syr Darya were ruled by the Karluk Turks and to their west were the Oghuz.
Zhetysu was populated by the Turgesh, who were divided into two tribes, the Tukhshi and the Azes mentioned in the Orkhon inscriptions, the remnants of the Oghuz Turks whose main body had moved to the west, becoming the Shato Turks (i.e. "Steppe Turks"), and interspersed with the Sogdian colonies.

Fuzûlî

FuzuliFizuliMuhammad Fuzuli
Fużūlī (Füzuli فضولی, c. 1494 – 1556) was the pen name of the Azerbaijani, of the Bayat tribes of Oghuz, poet, writer and thinker Muhammad bin Suleyman (Məhəmməd Ben Süleyman Baghdadi محمد بن سليمان بغدادی).

Beylik of Dulkadir

DulkadiridsDulkadirDulkadir Beylik
The Anatolian beylik of Dulkadir (Modern Turkish: Dulkadiroğulları Beyliği ), was one of the frontier principalities established by the Oghuz, Turcoman clans Bayat, Afshar and Begdili after the decline of Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm.

Bayat (tribe)

BayatBayat clanBayat tribe
The Bayat tribe (Bayat tayfası, Bayat boyu, Baýat taýpasy, ) is one of the Oghuz tribes in Turkmenistan, Iran, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria.

Safavid dynasty

SafavidSafavid EmpireSafavids
By this time, the bulk of the Safaviyya were nomadic Oghuz Turkic-speaking clans from Asia Minor and Azerbaijan and were known as Qizilbash "Red Heads" because of their distinct red headgear.

Zengid dynasty

ZengidZengidsZangid
The Zengid or Zangid dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Oghuz Turk origin, which ruled parts of the Levant and Upper Mesopotamia on behalf of the Seljuk Empire.

Turkic tribal confederations

Turkic tribesOghuzOghur
In the 8th century, they formed a tribal confederation conventionally named the Oghuz Yabgu State in central Asia.