Ojibwe

OjibwaChippewaOjibwayOjibwe peopleChippewasChippewa IndiansOjibwasOjibwa peopleOjibwe IndiansChippewa (Ojibwe)
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United States.wikipedia
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Cree

Cree peopleNehiyawCree Nation
In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the Cree. Historically, through the Saulteaux branch, they were a part of the Iron Confederacy, joining the Cree, Assiniboine, and Metis.
Today, they live mostly in Montana, where they share the Rocky Boy Indian Reservation with Ojibwe (Chippewa) people.

Anishinaabe

AnishinabeAnishinaabegAnishnaabe
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United States.
These also include the Odawa, Saulteaux, Ojibwe (including Mississaugas), Potawatomi, Oji-Cree, and Algonquin peoples.

Sioux

DakotaSioux IndianSiouan
In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American peoples, surpassed in number only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw and Sioux.
Wars with the Ojibwe throughout the 1700s pushed the Dakota into southern Minnesota, where the Western Dakota (Yankton, Yanktonai) and Teton (Lakota) were residing.

Algonquin people

AlgonquinAlgonquinsAlgonquin Nation
They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi.
Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anicinàpe (Anishinaabe) grouping.

Council of Three Fires

Three Fires ConfederacyAnishinaabeAnishinaabeg Confederacy
They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi.
The council is a long-standing Anishinaabe alliance of the Ojibwe (or Chippewa), Ottawa (or Odawa), and Potawatomi North American Native tribes.

Potawatomi

PottawatomiePottawatomiPotowatomi
They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi.
The Potawatomi are part of a long-term alliance, called the Council of Three Fires, with the Ojibwe and Odawa (Ottawa).

Saulteaux

Plains OjibweSalteauxBungi
Historically, through the Saulteaux branch, they were a part of the Iron Confederacy, joining the Cree, Assiniboine, and Metis.
They are a branch of the Ojibwe when they pushed west forming into a mixed culture of woodlands and plains Indigenous customs and traditions.

Oji-Cree

AnishinaabeAnishininiOjibway and Cree
They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi.
The Oji-Cree people are descended from historical intermarriage between the Ojibwa and Cree cultures, but are generally considered a nation distinct from either of their ancestral groups.

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

Sault Ste. MarieSault Ste MarieSault Ste Marie, Ontario
Because many Ojibwe were formerly located around the outlet of Lake Superior, which the French colonists called Sault Ste. Marie for its rapids, the early Canadian settlers referred to the Ojibwe as Saulteurs.
The Ojibwe, the indigenous Anishinaabe inhabitants of the area, call this area Baawitigong, meaning "place of the rapids."

List of Ojibwa ethnonyms

Ojibwa ethnonymsmany other variantsmany variations
Although many variations exist in the literature, "Chippewa" is more common in the United States, and "Ojibway" predominates in Canada, but both terms are used in each country.
This is a list of various names the Ojibwa have been recorded.

Lake Superior

SuperiorGitche GumeeLakehead
Because many Ojibwe were formerly located around the outlet of Lake Superior, which the French colonists called Sault Ste. Marie for its rapids, the early Canadian settlers referred to the Ojibwe as Saulteurs.
The Ojibwe name for the lake is gichi-gami (pronounced as gitchi-gami and kitchi-gami in other dialects), meaning "great sea".

Nipissing First Nation

NipissingGarden VillageNipissing 10
They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi.
The Nipissing are part of the Anishinaabe peoples, a grouping of people speaking Algonquin languages, which includes the Odawa, Ojibwe, Potawatomi, and Algonquins.

Midwestern United States

MidwestMidwesternAmerican Midwest
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United States.
The major tribes of the Great Lakes region included the Hurons, Ottawa, Chippewas or Ojibwas, Potawatomis, Winnebago (Ho-chunk), Menominees, Sacs, Neutrals, Fox, and the Miami.

Wiigwaasabak

birch bark scrollsbirch bark scrollbirchbark scrolls
The Ojibwe are known for their birch bark canoes, birch bark scrolls, mining and trade in copper, as well as their cultivation of wild rice and maple syrup.
Wiigwaasabak (Ojibwe language, plural: wiigwaasabakoon) are birch bark scrolls, on which the Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America wrote complex geometrical patterns and shapes.

The Song of Hiawatha

Song of HiawathaHiawatha1855 poem
The popularity of the epic poem The Song of Hiawatha, written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in 1855, publicized the Ojibwe culture.
The epic relates the fictional adventures of an Ojibwe warrior named Hiawatha and the tragedy of his love for Minnehaha, a Dakota woman.

Mississaugas

MississaugaMississauga IndiansMississauga Ojibwe
Ojibwe who were originally located along the Mississagi River and made their way to southern Ontario are known as the Mississaugas.
They are closely related to the Ojibwe.

Assiniboine

AssiniboinesAssiniboine peopleNakota
Historically, through the Saulteaux branch, they were a part of the Iron Confederacy, joining the Cree, Assiniboine, and Metis.
The Assiniboine and Sioux were both gradually pushed westward onto the plains from the woodlands of Minnesota by the Ojibwe, who had acquired firearms from their French allies.

Menominee language

MenomineeMenominiMenomonee
Its sister languages include Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Cree, Fox, Menominee, Potawatomi, and Shawnee among the northern Plains tribes.
The Anishinaabe (Ojibwa), their neighbors to the north who also speak an Algonquian language, also use this term for them.

Duluth, Minnesota

DuluthDuluth, MNDuluth, United States
(This has since been developed as the present-day Duluth/Superior cities.) The people were directed in a vision by the miigis being to go to the "place where there is food (i.e., wild rice) upon the waters."
The Anishinaabe, also known as the Ojibwe or Chippewa, have inhabited the Lake Superior region for more than 500 years.

Odawa

OttawaOdawa peopleOttawas
They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi.
They are one of the Anishinaabeg, related to but distinct from the Ojibwe and Potawatomi peoples.

Wisconsin

WIState of WisconsinGeography of Wisconsin
They drove the Sioux from the Upper Mississippi region to the area of the present-day Dakotas, and forced the Fox down from northern Wisconsin.
Other theories include claims that the name originated from one of a variety of Ojibwa words meaning "red stone place", "where the waters gather", or "great rock".

Kechewaishke

Chief BuffaloBizhiki'' (Buffalo)Gichi-weshkiinh'' (Great Renewer)
Through the efforts of Chief Buffalo and the rise of popular opinion in the US against Ojibwe removal, the bands east of the Mississippi were allowed to return to reservations on ceded territory.
– September 7, 1855) was a major Ojibwa leader born at La Pointe in the Apostle Islands group of Lake Superior, in what is now northern Wisconsin, USA.

Minnesota

MNState of MinnesotaMinnesota, USA
Following the war, the United States government tried to forcibly remove all the Ojibwe to Minnesota, west of the Mississippi River.
French explorers, missionaries, and fur traders began exploring the region in the 17th century, encountering the Dakota and Ojibwe/Anishinaabe tribes.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the Cree.
The Métis (from French métis – "mixed") are descendants of unions between Cree, Ojibwe, Algonquin, Saulteaux, Menominee, Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and other First Nations in the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th centuries and Europeans, mainly French.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
In part due to its long trading alliance, the Ojibwe allied with the French against Great Britain and its colonists in the Seven Years' War (also called the French and Indian War).
The British colonists were supported at various times by the Iroquois, Catawba, and Cherokee tribes, and the French colonists were supported by Wabanaki Confederacy member tribes Abenaki and Mi'kmaq, and the Algonquin, Lenape, Ojibwa, Ottawa, Shawnee, and Wyandot tribes.