Oklahoma City bombing

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building two days after the bombing, viewed from across the adjacent parking lot
McVeigh and Nichols cited the federal government's actions against the Branch Davidian compound in the 1993 Waco siege (shown above) as a reason why they perpetrated the Oklahoma City bombing.
Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building as it appeared before its destruction
McVeigh's movement in the Ryder truck (red dashed line) and escape on foot (blue dashed line) on the day of the bombing
An aerial view, looking from the north, of the destruction
FBI sketch (left) and McVeigh (right).
McVeigh about to exit the Perry, Oklahoma, courthouse on April 21, 1995
Floor-by-floor diagram detailing the location of the victims in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.
U.S. Air Force personnel and firefighters removing rubble in the rescue attempt
The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building is demolished on May 23, 1995, over a month after the incident. The bomb was housed in a Ryder truck similar to the one visible in the lower left of the photograph.
Bill Clinton's notes for address to the Oklahoma City bombing victims on April 23, 1995
Charles Porter's photograph of firefighter Chris Fields holding the dying infant Baylee Almon won the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography in 1996.
Rescue Team 5 remembers the victims who died in the bombing.
The site of the building after it was demolished, three months after the bombing

Domestic terrorist truck bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States, on April 19, 1995.

- Oklahoma City bombing
The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building two days after the bombing, viewed from across the adjacent parking lot

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The bombing site on April 21, 1995

Terry Nichols

The bombing site on April 21, 1995
Florence ADMAX USP, the supermax security prison where Nichols resides.

Terry Lynn Nichols (born April 1, 1955) is an American domestic terrorist who was convicted of being an accomplice in the Oklahoma City bombing.

The Mount Carmel Center engulfed in flames on April 19, 1993

Waco siege

The law enforcement siege of the compound that belonged to the religious sect Branch Davidians.

The law enforcement siege of the compound that belonged to the religious sect Branch Davidians.

The Mount Carmel Center engulfed in flames on April 19, 1993
Vernon Howell (later David Koresh) in a 1987 mug shot
The Branch Davidian compound—Mount Carmel Center—as photographed during the ensuing siege
Remains of a swimming pool left on the grounds of Mount Carmel Center in 1997
The destroyed Alfred Murrah Federal Building
A memorial to the four ATF agents killed in the February 28 raid on the Mount Carmel Center

The events near Waco, along with the law enforcement siege at Ruby Ridge less than 12 months earlier, have been cited by commentators as catalysts for the Oklahoma City bombing by Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, as well as the modern day American militia movement and a rise in opposition to firearm regulation.

Oklahoma City

Capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma.

Capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma.

Map of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) 1889, showing Oklahoma as a train stop on a railroad line. Britannica 9th ed.
Lithograph of Oklahoma City from 1890
Oklahoma City National Memorial at Christmas
Mid-May 2006 photograph of Oklahoma City taken from the International Space Station (ISS)
Devon Energy Center, tallest building in the state
Automobile Alley in Oklahoma City
Looking up in the heart of Oklahoma City's Central Business District
Map of racial distribution in Oklahoma City, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people: White, Black, Asian , Hispanic or Other (yellow)
Old Interstate 40 Crosstown, Oklahoma City
The Murrah Federal Building after the attack
The Sonic Drive-In restaurant chain is headquartered in Oklahoma City.
Water taxis in Oklahoma City's downtown Bricktown neighborhood
The Survivor Tree on the grounds of the Oklahoma City National Memorial
Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, home of the Oklahoma City Dodgers and the Big 12 Baseball Tournament
Myriad Botanical Gardens, the centerpiece of downtown OKC
Oklahoma State Capitol, seen from the OK History Center
The Art Deco city hall building, a block from the Civic Center
Oklahoma City region population dot map and 2016 presidential election results by precinct (click to enlarge).
OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City
Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School
United Airlines Boeing 737 aircraft at the East Concourse of Will Rogers World Airport
Streetcar of the OKC Streetcar system passing the historic First United Methodist Church, in downtown
OU Physicians Center
INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center

It was the site of the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, in which 168 people died, the deadliest terror attack in U.S. history until the attacks of September 11, 2001, and the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers board a ship.

American militia movement

Term used by law enforcement and security analysts to refer to a number of private organizations that include paramilitary or similar elements.

Term used by law enforcement and security analysts to refer to a number of private organizations that include paramilitary or similar elements.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers board a ship.

The Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995, the second anniversary of the Waco fire, drew nationwide attention to the militia movement as Timothy McVeigh was associated with the Michigan Militia, having possibly attended meetings before the attack.

In 1868, this committee of representatives prosecuted President Andrew Johnson in his impeachment trial, but the Senate did not convict him.

Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996

Introduced to the United States Congress in April 1995 as a Senate Bill.

Introduced to the United States Congress in April 1995 as a Senate Bill.

In 1868, this committee of representatives prosecuted President Andrew Johnson in his impeachment trial, but the Senate did not convict him.

The bill was presented by then-Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole and passed with broad bipartisan support by Congress (91–8 in the US Senate, 293–133 in the U.S. House of Representatives) following the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

The result of a car bombing during the Iraq War

Car bomb

Improvised explosive device designed to be detonated in an automobile or other vehicles.

Improvised explosive device designed to be detonated in an automobile or other vehicles.

The result of a car bombing during the Iraq War
Car bomb in Iraq, made up of a number of artillery shells concealed in the back of a pickup truck.
A mock explosion of a pickup truck converted to SVBIED, used by U.S. marines for OPFOR purposes at Camp Pendleton
TSA officers view the post-blast remains of a Dodge Neon after an explosive was detonated inside it during training.
Vietcong car bombing aftermath scene in Saigon, 1965.
A 2005 car bombing in Iraq, in which a second car bomb was detonated while US forces were investigating the scene of an earlier such blast, resulting in 18 casualties.

In larger vehicles and trucks, weights of around 7,000 pounds (3,200 kg) or more have been used, for example, in the Oklahoma City bombing.

FBI mugshot of McVeigh in 1995

Timothy McVeigh

FBI mugshot of McVeigh in 1995
The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building two days after the Oklahoma City bombing
FBI forensic sketch compared to mugshot of McVeigh
McVeigh about to be led out of a Perry, Oklahoma, courthouse two days after the bombing
McVeigh was held at USP Florence ADMAX in Colorado until 1999
McVeigh was held on federal death row at USP Terre Haute in Indiana after 1999

Timothy James McVeigh (April 23, 1968 – June 11, 2001) was an American domestic terrorist responsible for the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people, 19 of whom were children, and injured more than 680 others, and destroyed one third of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

Drug Enforcement Administration

United States federal law enforcement agency under the U.S. Department of Justice tasked with combating drug trafficking and distribution within the U.S. It is the lead agency for domestic enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act, sharing concurrent jurisdiction with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

United States federal law enforcement agency under the U.S. Department of Justice tasked with combating drug trafficking and distribution within the U.S. It is the lead agency for domestic enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act, sharing concurrent jurisdiction with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Drug Enforcement Administration 25th Anniversary badge
Map of the 21 DEA domestic field divisions: 1. Chicago, 2. Detroit, 3. Atlanta, 4. Dallas, 5. Denver, 6. Boston, 7. El Paso, 8. Houston, 9. Los Angeles, 10. Miami, 11. Newark, 12. New Orleans, 13. New York, 14. Philadelphia, 15. Phoenix, 16. San Diego, 17. San Francisco, 18. Seattle, 19. St. Louis, 20. Caribbean (San Juan, Puerto Rico), 21. Washington, D.C.
DEA agents escort Colombian drug lord Miguel Rodríguez Orejuela after his extradition to the United States in 2005.
DEA Aviation Division logo
DEA agents in MultiCam uniform burning hashish seized in Operation Albatross in Afghanistan, 2007
Two DEA agents in a shoot house exercise
"Operation Somalia Express" was an 18-month investigation that included the coordinated takedown of a 44-member international narcotics-trafficking organization responsible for smuggling more than 25 tons of khat from the Horn of Africa to the United States.
People protesting medical marijuana raids

This attack caused the deaths of two DEA employees, one task force member, and two contractors in the Oklahoma City bombing.

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

Domestic law enforcement agency within the United States Department of Justice.

Domestic law enforcement agency within the United States Department of Justice.

The seal of the ATF when it was a part of the U.S. treasury department.
Initial flag of ATF as part of the U.S. Department of Justice; the Latin scroll was later replaced with one bearing the agency's name.
ATF investigators display weapons seized for violations of the Gun Control Act

Timothy McVeigh cited Ruby Ridge and Waco Siege as his motivation for the Oklahoma City Bombing, which took place on April 19, 1995, exactly two years after the end of the Waco Siege.

Depiction of the siege of Lisbon, 1147

Ruby Ridge

The site of an eleven-day siege in 1992 in Boundary County, Idaho, near Naples.

The site of an eleven-day siege in 1992 in Boundary County, Idaho, near Naples.

Depiction of the siege of Lisbon, 1147

The events that took place at Ruby Ridge, and the law enforcement response during the Waco siege roughly six months later, have been cited by commentators as catalysts for the Oklahoma City bombing by Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols.