Oklahoma Enabling Act

Enabling Act of 1906a statute authorizing the people of the Oklahoma and Indian TerritoriesConstitutional ConventionEnabling ActEnabling Act in 1906
The Enabling Act of 1906, in its first part, empowered the people residing in Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory to elect delegates to a state constitutional convention and subsequently to be admitted to the union as a single union.wikipedia
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Indian Territory

Indian TerritoriesIndianIndian Country
The Enabling Act of 1906, in its first part, empowered the people residing in Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory to elect delegates to a state constitutional convention and subsequently to be admitted to the union as a single union. However, residents of Indian Territory sponsored a bill to admit Indian Territory as the State of Sequoyah, which was defeated in the U. S. Congress in 1905. President Theodore Roosevelt then proposed a compromise that would join Indian Territory with Oklahoma Territory to form a single state.
The 1907 Oklahoma Enabling Act created the single state of Oklahoma by combining Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory, ending the existence of an Indian Territory.

Oklahoma Territory

OklahomaTerritory of OklahomaTerritory
The Enabling Act of 1906, in its first part, empowered the people residing in Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory to elect delegates to a state constitutional convention and subsequently to be admitted to the union as a single union. President Theodore Roosevelt then proposed a compromise that would join Indian Territory with Oklahoma Territory to form a single state.
Roosevelt recommended that the Indian and Oklahoma Territories be granted joint statehood, which led to Congress passing the Oklahoma Enabling Act to allow this upon writing and ratifying a constitution.

Oklahoma Organic Act

Organic Act of 1890Organic Act in 1890Five Civilized Tribes Act
The Oklahoma Organic Act of 1890 contemplated admitting Oklahoma and Indian Territories as a single state.
The Osage Reservation was part of Oklahoma Territory under the Oklahoma Organic Act of 1890 and was made a semiautonomous district by the Enabling Act of 1906.

Oklahoma

OKState of OklahomaOklahoma, USA
President Roosevelt proclaimed Oklahoma a state on November 16, 1907.
On June 16, 1906, Congress enacted a statute authorizing the people of the Oklahoma and Indian Territories (as well what would become the states of Arizona and New Mexico) to form a constitution and state government in order to be admitted as a state.

Guthrie, Oklahoma

GuthrieGuthrie, Oklahoma TerritoryGuthrie, OK
This was specified in the 1906 Oklahoma Enabling Act, which established certain requirements for the new state constitution.

State of Sequoyah

SequoyahSequoyah statehood
However, residents of Indian Territory sponsored a bill to admit Indian Territory as the State of Sequoyah, which was defeated in the U. S. Congress in 1905.
President Theodore Roosevelt then proposed a compromise that would join Indian Territory with Oklahoma Territory to form a single state and resulted in passage of the Oklahoma Enabling Act, which he signed June 16, 1906.

Coyle v. Smith

Coyle v. Smith was the US Supreme Court Case that helped define the equal footing doctrine.
Coyle v. Smith, 221 U.S. 559 (1911), was a Supreme Court of the United States case that held that the newly created state of Oklahoma was permitted to move its capital city from Guthrie to Oklahoma City, notwithstanding the Enabling Act provision that prohibited it from being moved from Guthrie until after 1913.

Constitution of Oklahoma

Oklahoma ConstitutionOklahoma Constitutional ConventionConstitution
The Act included several other requirements for the Oklahoma Constitution:

Former Indian reservations in Oklahoma

tribal groups in Oklahoma
* Former Indian Reservations in Oklahoma
In preparation for Oklahoma's admission to the union on an "equal footing with the original states" by 1907, through a series of acts, including the Oklahoma Organic Act and the Oklahoma Enabling Act, Congress attempted to unilaterally dissolve all sovereign tribal governments within the state of Oklahoma.

Equal footing

Equal Footing Doctrineequalequal weight
Coyle v. Smith was the US Supreme Court Case that helped define the equal footing doctrine.
W.H. Coyle, owner of large property interests in Guthrie, sued the state of Oklahoma, arguing that the move was performed in violation of the state constitution's acceptance of the terms of the 1906 Oklahoma Enabling Act, which mandated the capital to be in Guthrie until 1913.

New Mexico Territory

Territory of New MexicoNew MexicoNew Mexico Territories
The act, in its second part, also enabled the people of New Mexico Territory and of Arizona Territory to form a constitution and State government and be admitted into the Union, requiring a referendum to determine if both territories should be admitted as a single state.

Arizona Territory

Territory of ArizonaArizonaArizona Territorial
The act, in its second part, also enabled the people of New Mexico Territory and of Arizona Territory to form a constitution and State government and be admitted into the Union, requiring a referendum to determine if both territories should be admitted as a single state.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltPresident Theodore RooseveltRoosevelt
President Theodore Roosevelt then proposed a compromise that would join Indian Territory with Oklahoma Territory to form a single state.

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City, OklahomaOklahoma City, OKOklahoma (Oklahoma City)
The requirement to keep Guthrie as the State's temporary capital was challenged in court after Oklahoma City, Oklahoma won the election and the capital was moved prematurely.

Osage County, Oklahoma

OsageOsage CountyOklahoma
It became a semi-autonomous district by the Oklahoma Enabling Act of 1906, and Osage County at the time of Oklahoma Statehood in 1907.

William H. Murray

William H. "Alfalfa Bill" MurrayAlfalfa Bill" MurrayAlfalfa Bill' Murray
In response to Congress's passage of the Enabling Act in 1906, the people of the two territories held a joint convention.

Caddo, Oklahoma

Caddo Caddo
We did not elect a delegate to Bill Murray’s famous Constitutional Convention; and tried to live upon the glories of the past.

Sequoyah Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention
On June 16, 1906, President Roosevelt signed the Oklahoma Enabling Act, which ruled that the Indian and Oklahoma territories would be granted statehood only as a combined state.