A report on Old Church Slavonic

Example of the Cyrillic alphabet: excerpt from the manuscript "Bdinski Zbornik" written in Old Slavonic, 1360
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A page from the Gospel of Miroslav, Serbian medieval manuscript, a 12th-century Byzantine-Slavonic book, National Library of Serbia.
The Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912), by Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic
"Simeon I of Bulgaria, the Morning Star of Slavonic Literature". (1923), by Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic

The first Slavic literary language.

- Old Church Slavonic

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Fragment rediscovered in 1975 (Sin. slav. 1/N, f.1r)

Euchologium Sinaiticum

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Fragment rediscovered in 1975 (Sin. slav. 1/N, f.1r)

The Euchologium Sinaiticum (scholarly abbreviation: Eu or Euch) is a 109-folio Old Church Slavonic euchologion in Glagolitic script.

Menologion with the lesson (Mat. 10:1-8) for Cosmas and Damian (heads in the majuscule), 1 November (Biblioteca apostolica vaticana, Cod. Vat. slav. 3, f.125v)

Codex Assemanius

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Menologion with the lesson (Mat. 10:1-8) for Cosmas and Damian (heads in the majuscule), 1 November (Biblioteca apostolica vaticana, Cod. Vat. slav. 3, f.125v)

Codex Assemanius (scholarly abbreviation Ass) is a rounded Glagolitic Old Church Slavonic canon evangeliary consisting of 158 illuminated parchment folios, dated to early 11th century.

Codex Suprasliensis

Codex Suprasliensis

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Codex Suprasliensis

The Codex Suprasliensis is a 10th-century Cyrillic literary monument, the largest extant Old Church Slavonic canon manuscript and the oldest Slavic literary work in Poland.

August Leskien

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German linguist active in the field of comparative linguistics, particularly relating to the Baltic and Slavic languages.

German linguist active in the field of comparative linguistics, particularly relating to the Baltic and Slavic languages.

Leskien is also the author of Handbuch der altbulgarischen Sprache, a guide to Old Church Slavonic (3rd ed.

Linguistic structure of Montenegro by settlements, 2003. Red is Montenegrin, in contrast with blue, Serbian.

Montenegrin language

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Normative variety of the Serbo-Croatian language mainly used by Montenegrins and is the official language of Montenegro.

Normative variety of the Serbo-Croatian language mainly used by Montenegrins and is the official language of Montenegro.

Linguistic structure of Montenegro by settlements, 2003. Red is Montenegrin, in contrast with blue, Serbian.
Linguistic structure of Montenegro by settlements, 2011. Red is Montenegrin.
Shtokavian subdialects in Montenegro.
A proposed Montenegrin alphabet which contains three more letters than the Serbian counterpart — Ś, З and Ź

The medieval literature was mostly written in Old Church Slavonic and its recensions, but most of the 19th century works were written in some of the dialects of Montenegro.

Psalterium Sinaiticum, folio 16 recto (manuscript Sin. slav. 38)

Psalterium Sinaiticum

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Psalterium Sinaiticum, folio 16 recto (manuscript Sin. slav. 38)
Folio 1 recto from the continuation of the Psalterium (manuscript Sin. slav. 2/N)

The Psalterium Sinaiticum (scholarly abbreviations: Psa or Ps. sin.) is a 209-folio Glagolitic Old Church Slavonic canon manuscript, the earliest Slavic psalter, dated to the 11th century.

Bulgaria

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Country in Southeast Europe.

Country in Southeast Europe.

Odrysian golden wreath in the National History Museum
Knyaz Boris I meeting the disciples of Saints Cyril and Methodius.
The walls of Tsarevets fortress in Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the second empire
The Battle of Nicopolis in 1396 marked the end of medieval Bulgarian statehood.
The Russo-Bulgarian defence of Shipka Pass in 1877
Borders of Bulgaria according to the preliminary Treaty of San Stefano
Tsar Boris III
Georgi Dimitrov, leader of the Bulgarian Communist Party from 1946 to 1949
Topography of Bulgaria
Bulgarian Black Sea Coast
The Pirin mountain range
Lacerta viridis in Ropotamo, one of Bulgaria's 16 biosphere reserves
Independence Square in Sofia: The headquarters of the Presidency (right), the National Assembly (centre) and the Council of Ministers (left).
Mikoyan MiG-29 jet fighters of the Bulgarian Air Force
Historical development of GDP per capita
Economic growth (green) and unemployment (blue) statistics since 2001
Tree map of Bulgarian exports in 2016
The launch of BulgariaSat-1 by SpaceX
Trakia motorway
Population trend since 1960
Population pyramid of Bulgaria in 2017
The Rectorate of Sofia University
Kuker in Lesichovo
Christo's Mastaba in Hyde Park, London
Grigor Dimitrov at the 2015 Italian Open
Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Sofia

The schools' emphasis on Christian scriptures made the Bulgarian Empire a centre of Slavic culture, bringing Slavs under the influence of Christianity and providing them with a written language.

Sava's book, 1.142

Sava's book

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Sava's book, 1.142

Sava's book (Савина книга, Savina kniga; Саввина книга, Savvina kniga) is a 129-folio Cyrillic Old Church Slavonic canon evangeliary, written in the eleventh century.

Cuneiform inscription Lugal Kiengi Kiuri, "King of Sumer and Akkad", on a seal of Sumerian king Shulgi (r. c. 2094–2047 BCE). The final ke4 is the composite of -k (genitive case) and -e (ergative case).

Genitive case

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Grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun—thus indicating an attributive relationship of one noun to the other noun.

Grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun—thus indicating an attributive relationship of one noun to the other noun.

Cuneiform inscription Lugal Kiengi Kiuri, "King of Sumer and Akkad", on a seal of Sumerian king Shulgi (r. c. 2094–2047 BCE). The final ke4 is the composite of -k (genitive case) and -e (ergative case).

Use of genitive for negation is obligatory in Slovene, Polish and Old Church Slavonic.

Realm under Braslav

Slavs in Lower Pannonia

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Early Slavs settled in the eastern and southern parts of the former Roman province of Pannonia.

Early Slavs settled in the eastern and southern parts of the former Roman province of Pannonia.

Realm under Braslav
Slavic migration and settlement during the Early Middle Ages, including the region of Pannonia.

During the rule of Pribina and Kocel, capital of the Principality of Lower Pannonia was Mosapurc (Mosapurc regia civitate), also known in Old-Slavonic as Blatnograd (modern Zalavár near Lake Balaton).