A report on Old Church Slavonic

Example of the Cyrillic alphabet: excerpt from the manuscript "Bdinski Zbornik" written in Old Slavonic, 1360
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A page from the Gospel of Miroslav, Serbian medieval manuscript, a 12th-century Byzantine-Slavonic book, National Library of Serbia.
The Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912), by Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic
"Simeon I of Bulgaria, the Morning Star of Slavonic Literature". (1923), by Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic

The first Slavic literary language.

- Old Church Slavonic

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Havlík's law

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Slavic rhythmic law dealing with the reduced vowels in Proto-Slavic.

Slavic rhythmic law dealing with the reduced vowels in Proto-Slavic.

Old Church Slavonic, for example, had no closed syllables at all.

Slavic liquid metathesis and pleophony

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The Slavic liquid metathesis refers to the phenomenon of metathesis of liquid consonants in the Common Slavic period in the South Slavic and West Slavic area.

The Slavic liquid metathesis refers to the phenomenon of metathesis of liquid consonants in the Common Slavic period in the South Slavic and West Slavic area.

On the other hand, the change had already been completed in the earliest Old Church Slavonic documents.

Horace Lunt

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Linguist in the field of Slavic Studies.

Linguist in the field of Slavic Studies.

There he taught the course on Old Church Slavonic grammar for four decades, creating what has become the standard handbook on it, now in its seventh edition.

2 Enoch

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Pseudepigraphic text in the apocalyptic genre.

Pseudepigraphic text in the apocalyptic genre.

2 Enoch has survived in more than twenty Old Bulgarian manuscripts and fragments, dated from the 14th to 18th centuries AD. These Old Bulgarian materials did not circulate independently, but were included in collections that often rearranged, abbreviated, or expanded them.

Map of the Bulgarian dialects within Bulgaria

Bulgarian dialects

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Bulgarian dialects are the regional varieties of the Bulgarian language, a South Slavic language.

Bulgarian dialects are the regional varieties of the Bulgarian language, a South Slavic language.

Map of the Bulgarian dialects within Bulgaria
The yat (*ě) split in the Bulgarian language.
Map of the big yus (*ǫ) isoglosses in Eastern South Slavic and eastern Torlakian according to the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences' atlas from 2001. 
Pronunciation of man and tooth, derived from proto-Slavic words *mǫžь and *zǫbъ on the map: 
1., (see зъб) 
2., (see заб) 
3. ,  
4. ,  
5. ,  
6. ,  
7. ,  
8. ,  
9. ,
isogloss clockwise (right or down/left or up of the line) 1. vat- bachva, bochva, etc./bąchva 2.yellow- zhąlt, zhląt, zhąt, etc./zhelt 3. road- pat, put, pot/pąt 4.paw- shąpa, shapa, shaka, etc./shepa
isogloss (clockwise) 1. thirsty- zhąden, zhaden, etc./zheden 2. red- tsraven, tsąrven/cherven, chirven 3. me, you- me, te/mą, tą, etc. 4. white- bel/byal (Yat border)
isogloss (clockwise) 1. meadows- polani/poleni 2. drunk- piyani/piyeni 3. cups- chashi/cheshi 4. caps- shapki/shepki
isogloss (clockwise) 1. frogs- zhabi/zhebi 2. I wait-chekam/chakam, 3.Yat border
isogloss (clockwise) 1. rings- prąstene, prąsteną/prasteni 2. I read- chetem/chetą 3. we read- cheteme, chitami, chetemo, etc./chetem, chitem, etc. 4. Yat border
isogloss (clockwise) 1. leg- noga/krak 2. loom- razboy/stan 3. shirt- koshula/riza 4. hot- zhezhko/goreshto
isogloss (clockwise) 1. don't- nemoy/nedey 2. I- ya, yaz, ye/az 3.he- on/toy 4. Yat border
isogloss (clockwise) 1. meat- méso/mesó 2. I read- chéta, chetem/chetá 3. pick- béri/berí 4. Yat border
Names of Watermelon- dinya, lubenica, karpuza, boston
Names of Melon- papesh, pipon, kavun, moravec

The main isogloss separating the Bulgarian dialects into Eastern and Western is the yat border, marking the different mutations of the Old Bulgarian yat form (ѣ, *ě), pronounced as either /ʲa/ or /ɛ/ to the east (byal, but plural beli in Balkan dialects, "white") and strictly as /ɛ/ to the west of it (bel, plural beli) throughout former Yugoslavia.

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East Slavic languages

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The East Slavic languages constitute one of the three regional subgroups of Slavic languages.

The East Slavic languages constitute one of the three regional subgroups of Slavic languages.

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After the conversion of the East Slavic region to Christianity the people used service books borrowed from Bulgaria, which were written in Old Church Slavonic.