Olive wreath

kotinoscrown of olive leavesolive leaf wreathsolive wreaths
The Olive wreath also known as kotinos, was the prize for the winner at the ancient Olympic Games.wikipedia
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Ancient Olympic Games

Olympic GamesOlympicOlympics
The Olive wreath also known as kotinos, was the prize for the winner at the ancient Olympic Games.
The prizes for the victors were olive leaf wreaths or crowns.

Olea oleaster

wild oliveGreek wild olive varietiesolive
It was a branch of the wild olive tree Kallistefanos Elea (also referred to as Elaia Kallistephanos) that grew at Olympia, intertwined to form a circle or a horse-shoe.
The wild-olive (Ancient Greek kotinos), which ancient Greeks distinguished from the cultivated olive tree (Ancient Greek ἐλάα), was used to fashion the olive wreath awarded victors at the ancient Olympic games.

Olive branch

olive branchesOlivebranch
It was a branch of the wild olive tree Kallistefanos Elea (also referred to as Elaia Kallistephanos) that grew at Olympia, intertwined to form a circle or a horse-shoe.
Olive wreaths were worn by brides and awarded to olympic victors.

Gold medal

goldgold medalistOlympic Gold Medal
In the ancient Olympic Games there were no gold, silver, or bronze medals.
At the Ancient Olympic Games only one winner per event was crowned with kotinos, an olive wreath made of wild olive leaves from a sacred tree near the temple of Zeus at Olympia.

Olympic medal

Olympic gold medalgold medalOlympic medalist
The olive wreath was the prize for the winner at the Ancient Olympic Games.

Laurel wreath

laurellaurel crownlaurel branch
Apollo is represented wearing a laurel wreath on his head, and wreaths were awarded to victors in athletic competitions, including the ancient Olympics — for which they were made of wild olive-tree known as "kotinos", (sc.

Olympia, Greece

OlympiaAncient OlympiaAltis
It was a branch of the wild olive tree Kallistefanos Elea (also referred to as Elaia Kallistephanos) that grew at Olympia, intertwined to form a circle or a horse-shoe.

Hellanodikai

Olympic judgesHellanodicaeHellanodíkai
From there, the Hellanodikai (the judges of the Olympic Games) would take them, make the wreaths and crown the winners of the Games.

Pausanias (geographer)

PausaniasDescription of GreecePaus.
According to Pausanias it was introduced by Heracles as a prize for the running race winner to honor his father Zeus.

Heracles

HeraklesHerculesAlcides
According to Pausanias it was introduced by Heracles as a prize for the running race winner to honor his father Zeus.

Stadion (running race)

stadionstadion racestade
According to Pausanias it was introduced by Heracles as a prize for the running race winner to honor his father Zeus.

Zeus

JupiterCronidesZeus Chrysaoreus
According to Pausanias it was introduced by Heracles as a prize for the running race winner to honor his father Zeus.

Temple of Zeus, Olympia

Temple of ZeusTemple of Zeus at Olympiasanctuary of Zeus
There was only one winner per event, crowned with an olive wreath made of wild-olive leaves from a sacred tree near the temple of Zeus at Olympia.

2004 Summer Olympics

20042004 Olympic Games2004 Olympics
Olive wreaths were given out during the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens in honor of the ancient tradition, because the games were being held in Greece which was also used as the official emblem.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
Olive wreaths were given out during the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens in honor of the ancient tradition, because the games were being held in Greece which was also used as the official emblem.

Herodotus

HerodotosHerodotus of HalicarnassusHerod.
Herodotus describes the following story which is relevant to the olive wreath.

Xerxes I

XerxesXerxes I of PersiaXerxes the Great
Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae.

Regions of ancient Greece

ancient AtticaArgolisancient Argolis
Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae.

Battle of Thermopylae

Thermopylae300 SpartansEpitaph of Simonides
Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae.

Tigranes

TigranTigran ITiritantaechmes
Then Tiritantaechmes, one of his generals uttered: ''"Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for virtue."'

Mardonius (general)

MardoniusMardonios
Then Tiritantaechmes, one of his generals uttered: ''"Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for virtue."'

Virtue

virtuesvirtuouspurity
Then Tiritantaechmes, one of his generals uttered: ''"Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for virtue."'

Aristophanes

AristofanesAristophanicOld Comedy
Aristophanes in Plutus makes a humorous comment on victorious athletes who are crowned with wreath made of wild olive instead of gold:

Plutus (play)

PlutusWealthPloutos
Aristophanes in Plutus makes a humorous comment on victorious athletes who are crowned with wreath made of wild olive instead of gold:

Chronology

chronologicalchronological ordertimeline
In fact, the names of the Olympic winners formed the chronology basis of the ancient world, as arranged by Timaeus in his work, The Histories.