Oliver Ellsworth

EllsworthEllsworth, OliverJemima (Leavitt) Ellsworth
Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807) was an American lawyer, judge, politician, and diplomat.wikipedia
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Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
He was a framer of the United States Constitution, a United States Senator from Connecticut, and the third Chief Justice of the United States. He served as a state judge during the 1780s and was selected as a delegate to the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, which produced the United States Constitution.
On July 24, a "Committee of Detail" – John Rutledge (South Carolina), Edmund Randolph (Virginia), Nathaniel Gorham (Massachusetts), Oliver Ellsworth (Connecticut), and James Wilson (Pennsylvania) – was elected to draft a detailed constitution reflective of the Resolutions passed by the convention up to that point.

American Whig–Cliosophic Society

American Whig-Cliosophic SocietyJames Madison Award for Distinguished Public ServiceCliosophic Society
Born in Windsor, Connecticut, Ellsworth attended the College of New Jersey where he helped found the American Whig–Cliosophic Society.
Its precursors, the American Whig Society and the Cliosophic Society, were founded at Princeton in 1769 and 1765 by James Madison, William Paterson, Oliver Ellsworth, and Aaron Burr.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
Additionally, Ellsworth received 11 electoral votes in the 1796 presidential election.
Delegates Oliver Ellsworth and Roger Sherman of Connecticut, a state which had adopted a gradual emancipation law three years earlier, also criticized the use of a national popular vote system.

Ellsworth Court

Few cases came before the Ellsworth Court, and he is chiefly remembered for his discouragement of the previous practice of seriatim opinion writing.
The Ellsworth Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States from 1796 to 1800, when Oliver Ellsworth served as the third Chief Justice of the United States.

Judiciary Act of 1789

Judiciary Act61789
He was the chief author of the Judiciary Act of 1789, which shaped the federal judiciary of the United States and established the Supreme Court's power to overturn state supreme court decisions that were contrary to the United States Constitution.
Senator Richard Henry Lee (AA-Virginia) reported the judiciary bill out of committee on June 12, 1789; Oliver Ellsworth of Connecticut was its chief author.

Windsor, Connecticut

WindsorWindsor, CTPoquonock
Born in Windsor, Connecticut, Ellsworth attended the College of New Jersey where he helped found the American Whig–Cliosophic Society.
Further north is the home of Oliver Ellsworth, third Chief Justice of the United States.

Committee of Detail

He also served on the Committee of Detail, which prepared the first draft of the Constitution, but he left the convention before signing the document.
The Committee was chaired by John Rutledge, with the other members including Edmund Randolph, Oliver Ellsworth, James Wilson, and Nathaniel Gorham.

1796 United States presidential election

17961796 presidential election1796 election
Additionally, Ellsworth received 11 electoral votes in the 1796 presidential election.
Pinckney won the second votes from a majority of the electors who voted for Adams, but 21 electors from New England and Maryland cast their second votes for other candidates, including Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth.

Noah Webster

WebsterNoah Webster, Jr.American Spelling Book
They had nine children including the twins William Wolcott Ellsworth, who married Noah Webster's daughter, served in Congress and became the governor of Connecticut; and Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, who became the first Commissioner of the United States Patent Office, the mayor of Hartford, president of Aetna Life Insurance and a large benefactor of Yale College.
He passed the bar examination after studying law under Oliver Ellsworth and others, but was unable to find work as a lawyer.

Connecticut

CTState of ConnecticutConn.
He was a framer of the United States Constitution, a United States Senator from Connecticut, and the third Chief Justice of the United States.
The origin of this nickname is uncertain, but it likely comes from Connecticut's pivotal role in the federal constitutional convention of 1787, during which Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth helped to orchestrate what became known as the Connecticut Compromise, or the Great Compromise.

William W. Ellsworth

William Wolcott EllsworthGovernor Ellsworth
They had nine children including the twins William Wolcott Ellsworth, who married Noah Webster's daughter, served in Congress and became the governor of Connecticut; and Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, who became the first Commissioner of the United States Patent Office, the mayor of Hartford, president of Aetna Life Insurance and a large benefactor of Yale College.
Born in Windsor on November 10, 1791, Ellsworth was the son of Founding Father Oliver Ellsworth, and son-in-law of Noah Webster, who named Ellsworth executor of his will.

Henry Leavitt Ellsworth

Henry L. EllsworthHenry EllsworthAnnie Ellsworth
They had nine children including the twins William Wolcott Ellsworth, who married Noah Webster's daughter, served in Congress and became the governor of Connecticut; and Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, who became the first Commissioner of the United States Patent Office, the mayor of Hartford, president of Aetna Life Insurance and a large benefactor of Yale College.
Ellsworth was born in Windsor, Connecticut, son of Founding Father and Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth and Abigail Wolcott.

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
He served as a state judge during the 1780s and was selected as a delegate to the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, which produced the United States Constitution.
On several occasions, the Connecticut delegation—Roger Sherman, Oliver Ellsworth and William Samuel Johnson—proposed a compromise that the House would have proportional representation and the Senate equal representation.

Henry W. Ellsworth

Oliver Ellsworth was the grandfather of Henry L. Ellsworth's son Henry W. Ellsworth.
The grandson of Oliver Ellsworth and son of Henry L. Ellsworth, Henry William Ellsworth was born in Windsor, Connecticut on May 14, 1814.

John Marshall

Chief Justice MarshallMarshallChief Justice John Marshall
He was succeeded as chief justice by John Marshall.
In late 1800, Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth resigned due to poor health.

Princeton University

PrincetonPrinceton CollegeCollege of New Jersey
Born in Windsor, Connecticut, Ellsworth attended the College of New Jersey where he helped found the American Whig–Cliosophic Society.
Former Chief Justice of the United States Oliver Ellsworth was an alumnus, as are current U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justices Samuel Alito, Elena Kagan, and Sonia Sotomayor.

Convention of 1800

Treaty of MortefontaineConvention of 1800 (Treaty of Mortefontaine)peace treaty
He simultaneously served as an envoy to France from 1799 to 1800, signing the Convention of 1800 to settle the hostilities of the Quasi-War.
The commission of William Vans Murray, Oliver Ellsworth, and William Richardson Davie was approved in early 1799, but disputes between Federalists and Jeffersonians delayed their arrival in Paris until March 1800.

Roger Sherman

Elizabeth Hartwell
Ellsworth participated in the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia as a delegate from Connecticut along with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson.
During the Constitutional Convention of 1787, summoned into existence to amend the Articles of Confederation, Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth offered what came to be called the Great Compromise or Connecticut Compromise.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
This gave the Federal Supreme Court the power to veto state supreme court decisions supportive of state laws in conflict with the U.S. Constitution.
Under Chief Justices Jay, Rutledge, and Ellsworth (1789–1801), the Court heard few cases; its first decision was West v. Barnes (1791), a case involving procedure.

Connecticut Compromise

Great Compromisecompromise on representationConnecticut Compromise (USA)
While at the convention, Ellsworth played a role in fashioning the Connecticut Compromise between the more populous states and the less populous states.
Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth, both of the Connecticut delegation, created a compromise that, in a sense, blended the Virginia (large-state) and New Jersey (small-state) proposals regarding congressional apportionment.

Jay Treaty

Jay's TreatyJay Treaty of 1794treaty
He also advocated in favor of the United States Bill of Rights and the Jay Treaty.
One interesting feature of this nationwide constitutional debate was an advisory opinion on the subject written by Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, in which he rejected any alleged right of the House of Representatives to decide upon the merits of the treaty.

Presidency of George Washington

first inauguration of George WashingtonWashington administrationinaugurated
According to John Adams, he was "the firmest pillar of [[Presidency of George Washington|[Washington's] whole administration]] in the Senate."[Brown, 231] Aaron Burr complained that if Ellsworth had misspelled the name of the Deity with two D's, "it would have taken the Senate three weeks to expunge the superfluous letter."
In September 1789, Congress passed the Judiciary Act of 1789, primarily written by Connecticut Senator Oliver Ellsworth.

John Rutledge

JohnRutledge, John
In 1796, after the Senate rejected the nomination of John Rutledge to serve as Chief Justice, President George Washington nominated Ellsworth to the position.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
According to John Adams, he was "the firmest pillar of [[Presidency of George Washington|[Washington's] whole administration]] in the Senate."[Brown, 231] Aaron Burr complained that if Ellsworth had misspelled the name of the Deity with two D's, "it would have taken the Senate three weeks to expunge the superfluous letter."
Adams was sworn into office as the nation's second president on March 4, 1797, by Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth.