Omega Electroquartz

The Omega Electroquartz was introduced in 1969 as the first production Swiss quartz watch.wikipedia
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Omega SA

OmegaOmega WatchesOmega brand
It was the collaboration of 20 Swiss watch companies and the movement was utilised by Rolex, Patek Phillipe and Omega SA amongst others.
1967: Quartz movement Beta 1 (later Beta 21) included in the same category as mechanical movements. Last year that Omega competed with mechanical movements as "old technology" not comparable with quartz. The production watch was released in 1970 as the Omega Electroquartz accurate to 5 seconds per month

Quartz crisis

Quartz Revolutionadventchallenge
The beta 21 is noteworthy and significantly important to the history of watch making as well as the Astron as it marked the first quartz watch produced on an industrial level and began the quartz crisis
The Beta 21 was released by numerous manufacturers including the Omega Electroquartz.

International Watch Company

IWCIWC Schaffhausen
Numerous Swiss manufacturers released beta 21 watches, the first Rolex Oysterquartz model used the beta 21 movement, Patek Philippe also produce a range of beta 21 models as did the International Watch Company including it in their first Davinci watch.
The Uhrenfabrik H. E. Homberger co-founded and was a shareholder in the Centre Électronique Horloger (CEH) in Neuchâtel and was financially involved in the development of the Beta 21 quartz wristwatch movement, which was first presented to the public at the 1969 Industrial Fair in Basel and used by other manufactures such as the Omega Electroquartz watches.

Rolex

TudorOyster DateRolex Australia
11. Rolex: Branded as Oysterquartz calibre 5100 available in 18-carat gold.
In 1968, Rolex collaborated with a consortium of 16 Swiss watch manufacturers to develop the Beta 21 quartz movement used in their Rolex Quartz Date 5100 alongside other manufactures including the Omega Electroquartz watches.

Omega Bullhead

Seamaster Bullhead
Shortly after the 1970 fair the Electroquartz became commercially available to the public in 18-carat gold and Stainess Steel, both with the pupitre case design at a cost of £1150 in 18-carat yellow gold with integral bracelet and £330 in Stainless steel on bracelet, by contrast the Moonwatch on bracelet was £93.50 and the now coveted Omega Bullhead was only £90.50.
At the time of introduction quartz watch technology such as the Omega Electroquartz was taking off and there was already a significantly established line of Omega chronographs which was complimented in the early 1970s by a range of automatic Omega Chronographs under calibre 1040, 1041 (the world's first chronometer chronograph used in the Omega Speedmaster 125) and 1045 as well as a range of electronic chronographs branded as Speedsonic and using a tuning fork movement with additional chronograph module.

Watch

wristwatchwatchesdigital watch
By the end of the 1970s and into the early 1980s the industry had made such advances in quartz watch technology that Omega were producing 18-carat models which were less than 2mm thick (the dinosaur) which were accurate to 5 seconds per month, as shown in the attached image of watches, which is a stark demonstration of how far quartz technology watches had progressed in less than a decade.
In 1970, 18 manufacturers exhibited production versions of the beta 21 wristwatch, including the Omega Electroquartz as well as Patek Philippe, Rolex Oysterquartz and Piaget.

Patek Philippe SA

Patek PhilippePatek Philippe & CoPatek Philippe with a Sky Moon Tourbillion
Numerous Swiss manufacturers released beta 21 watches, the first Rolex Oysterquartz model used the beta 21 movement, Patek Philippe also produce a range of beta 21 models as did the International Watch Company including it in their first Davinci watch.
In fact, Patek Philippe was one of the twenty Swiss watch companies that collaboratively developed the first Swiss quartz movements, including the Beta 21 movement (1969) which was used by several manufacturers in their watches such as the Omega Electroquartz watches.

Astron (wristwatch)

Astron35 SQ AstronElectronic Quartz Wristwatch
The first production watches were introduced to the market in 1970 very shortly after the world's first commercial quartz wristwatch, the Seiko-Quartz Astron 35SQ in December 1969.

Rolex Oysterquartz

Numerous Swiss manufacturers released beta 21 watches, the first Rolex Oysterquartz model used the beta 21 movement, Patek Philippe also produce a range of beta 21 models as did the International Watch Company including it in their first Davinci watch.

Bulova

Bulova Watch CompanyAccutronBulova Watch Co.
2. Bulova:Branded as Accuquartz, available in an 18-carat gold models.

Favre-Leuba

3. Favre-Leuba: This has only ever been seen as a movement with dial and not as a production watch.

Jaeger-LeCoultre

JaegerJaeger instrument panelJaeger-Le Coultre
5. Jaeger-LeCoultre: Branded as Masterquartz however this has only been seen as a movement with dial and not as a production watch.

Longines

Longines PrizeLongines Ambassador of EleganceLongines watches
7: Longines: Branded as Quartz-Chron, this has only ever been seen as a single production watch in stainless steel.

Zenith

zenith angledirectly overheadup
12. Zenith: This has only ever been seen as a movement without dial and not as a production watch.

Quartz

rock crystalquartz crystalcitrine
The beta 22 was a development of the beta 21 available in date and non date models with refined quartz circuits.

Quartz clock

quartz watchquartzquartz movement
The Omega Electroquartz was introduced in 1969 as the first production Swiss quartz watch.

Biel/Bienne

BielBiel, SwitzerlandBienne
There are very few remaining examples of these clocks, other than those on display at the Omega museum in Bienne and Swiss Time Services in the UK, and there are less than 10 known examples in private collections.

Société Suisse pour l'Industrie Horlogère

SSIH
Omega's development of their own in house Megaquartz range of watches developed by SSIH included the reliable 32 kHz lines (accurate to 5 seconds per month) as well as their flagship Omega Marine Chronometer (accurate to 12 seconds per year) rendered even Omegas efforts to reap their investment very difficult.

Omega Marine Chronometer

Omega's development of their own in house Megaquartz range of watches developed by SSIH included the reliable 32 kHz lines (accurate to 5 seconds per month) as well as their flagship Omega Marine Chronometer (accurate to 12 seconds per year) rendered even Omegas efforts to reap their investment very difficult.

Omega Chrono-Quartz

Omega were at the forefront of quartz wristwatch development in Switzerland, they had already introduced the Omega Electroquartz as the first Swiss production watch and the Omega Marine Chronometer as the first wristwatch to gain certification as a Marine Chronometer (and was accurate to 1 second per month).