Open-source software

open sourceopen-sourceopen source softwareopen-source applicationopen-sourcedopenopen sourcedopen-source applicationsopen source programmingopen software
Open-source software shares similarities with Free Software and is now part of the broader term Free and open-source softwarewikipedia
4,405 Related Articles

Open collaboration

According to scientists who have studied it, open-source software is a prominent example of open collaboration.
It is prominently observed in open source software, but can also be found in many other instances, such as in Internet forums, mailing lists and online communities.

Eric S. Raymond

Eric RaymondRaymond, EricESR
In 1997, Eric Raymond published The Cathedral and the Bazaar, a reflective analysis of the hacker community and free-software principles. A group of individuals at the session included Tim O'Reilly, Linus Torvalds, Tom Paquin, Jamie Zawinski, Larry Wall, Brian Behlendorf, Sameer Parekh, Eric Allman, Greg Olson, Paul Vixie, John Ousterhout, Guido van Rossum, Philip Zimmermann, John Gilmore and Eric S. Raymond. In his 1997 essay The Cathedral and the Bazaar, open-source evangelist Eric S. Raymond suggests a model for developing OSS known as the bazaar model.
Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is an American software developer, author of the widely cited 1997 essay and 1999 book The Cathedral and the Bazaar and other works, and open-source software advocate.

Open-source license

open sourceopen-sourceopen source license
Open-source software (OSS) is a type of computer software in which source code is released under a license in which the copyright holder grants users the rights to study, change, and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose.
One popular set of open-source software licenses are those approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) based on their Open Source Definition (OSD).

KompoZer

This source code subsequently became the basis behind SeaMonkey, Mozilla Firefox, Thunderbird and KompoZer.
KompoZer was an open source WYSIWYG HTML editor based on the now-discontinued Nvu editor.

Tim O'Reilly

Tim O’Reilly
The new term they chose was "open source", which was soon adopted by Bruce Perens, publisher Tim O'Reilly, Linus Torvalds, and others. A group of individuals at the session included Tim O'Reilly, Linus Torvalds, Tom Paquin, Jamie Zawinski, Larry Wall, Brian Behlendorf, Sameer Parekh, Eric Allman, Greg Olson, Paul Vixie, John Ousterhout, Guido van Rossum, Philip Zimmermann, John Gilmore and Eric S. Raymond.
He popularised the terms open source and Web 2.0.

Open Source Initiative

OSIOpen Source Initiative (OSI)open technologies
The Open Source Initiative was founded in February 1998 to encourage use of the new term and evangelize open-source principles.
The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting open-source software.

Free and open-source software

free and open-sourcefree and open source softwarefree and open source
However, while Free and open-source software has historically played a role outside of the mainstream of private software development, companies as large as Microsoft have begun to develop official open-source presences on the Internet.
Free and open-source software (FOSS) is software that can be classified as both free software and open-source software.

Free software

freefree-softwarefreely
The paper received significant attention in early 1998, and was one factor in motivating Netscape Communications Corporation to release their popular Netscape Communicator Internet suite as free software.
Although both definitions refer to almost equivalent corpora of programs, the Free Software Foundation recommends using the term "free software" rather than "open-source software" (a younger vision coined in 1998), because the goals and messaging are quite dissimilar.

Brian Behlendorf

A group of individuals at the session included Tim O'Reilly, Linus Torvalds, Tom Paquin, Jamie Zawinski, Larry Wall, Brian Behlendorf, Sameer Parekh, Eric Allman, Greg Olson, Paul Vixie, John Ousterhout, Guido van Rossum, Philip Zimmermann, John Gilmore and Eric S. Raymond.
Brian Behlendorf (born March 30, 1973) is an American technologist, executive, computer programmer and leading figure in the open-source software movement.

Open-source model

open sourceopen-sourceopen
Open-source software may be developed in a collaborative public manner.
Open-source software is software which source code is published and made available to the public, enabling anyone to copy, modify and redistribute the source code without paying royalties or fees.

Mozilla

Firefox MarketplaceMozilla CorporationMozilla Festival
The open source label came out of a strategy session held on April 7, 1998 in Palo Alto in reaction to Netscape's January 1998 announcement of a source code release for Navigator (as Mozilla).
The project took its name, "Mozilla", after the original code-name of the Netscape Navigator browser — a portmanteau of "Mosaic and Godzilla", and used to co-ordinate the development of the Mozilla Application Suite, the open-source version of Netscape's internet software, Netscape Communicator.

Source code

codesourcesource file
Open-source software (OSS) is a type of computer software in which source code is released under a license in which the copyright holder grants users the rights to study, change, and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose.
Software, and its accompanying source code, can be associated with several licensing paradigms; the most important distinction is open source vs proprietary software.

Software

computer softwaresoftware technologyprogram
Open-source software (OSS) is a type of computer software in which source code is released under a license in which the copyright holder grants users the rights to study, change, and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose.
Open source software, on the other hand, comes with a free software license, granting the recipient the rights to modify and redistribute the software.

The Open Source Definition

Open Source Definitionopen sourcedefinition
The Open Source Definition presents an open-source philosophy and further defines the terms of use, modification and redistribution of open-source software.
The Open Source Definition is a document published by the Open Source Initiative, to determine whether a software license can be labeled with the open-source certification mark.

Eclipse Public License

EPLEclipseEclipse Public
Examples of free software license / open-source licenses include Apache License, BSD license, GNU General Public License, GNU Lesser General Public License, MIT License, Eclipse Public License and Mozilla Public License.
The Eclipse Public License (EPL) is an open source software license used by the Eclipse Foundation for its software.

Mozilla Public License

MPLMPL 2.0MPL 1.1
Examples of free software license / open-source licenses include Apache License, BSD license, GNU General Public License, GNU Lesser General Public License, MIT License, Eclipse Public License and Mozilla Public License.
The Mozilla Public License (MPL) is a free and open source software license developed and maintained by the Mozilla Foundation.

Netscape Navigator

NavigatorNetscapeMosaic Netscape
The open source label came out of a strategy session held on April 7, 1998 in Palo Alto in reaction to Netscape's January 1998 announcement of a source code release for Navigator (as Mozilla).
Mozilla is now a generic name for matters related to the open source successor to Netscape Communicator.

Standish Group

A 2008 report by the Standish Group states that adoption of open-source software models has resulted in savings of about $60 billion (£48 billion) per year to consumers.
The Standish Group has reported on subjects such as software: commercial, free, and open source; project management such as critical chain project management; projects such as Confirm Project, etc.

Open-source software advocacy

open source advocateopen-sourceopen-source evangelist
In his 1997 essay The Cathedral and the Bazaar, open-source evangelist Eric S. Raymond suggests a model for developing OSS known as the bazaar model.
Open-source software advocacy is the practice of attempting to increase the awareness and improve the perception of open-source software.

Free software license

free softwarefree software licencefree software licenses
Examples of free software license / open-source licenses include Apache License, BSD license, GNU General Public License, GNU Lesser General Public License, MIT License, Eclipse Public License and Mozilla Public License.
Starting in the mid-1990s and until the mid-2000s, the open-source movement pushed and focused the free-software idea forward in the wider public and business perception.

Netscape Communicator

CommunicatorCommunicator 4.0Netscape 4.0
The paper received significant attention in early 1998, and was one factor in motivating Netscape Communications Corporation to release their popular Netscape Communicator Internet suite as free software.
By the time version 4.5 was released, Netscape had started the Mozilla open source project and had ceased charging for Communicator.

Apache Subversion

SubversionSVNSubversion (SVN)
Revision control systems such as Concurrent Versions System (CVS) and later Subversion (SVN) and Git are examples of tools, often themselves open source, help manage the source code files and the changes to those files for a software project.
Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after its command name svn) is a software versioning and revision control system distributed as open source under the Apache License.

Comparison of source-code-hosting facilities

a number of providerscode-hosting siterepository browser
The projects are frequently hosted and published on source-code-hosting facilities such as Launchpad.
They are often used by open-source software projects and other multi-developer projects to handle various versions.

Netscape

Netscape CommunicationsNetscape Communications CorporationNetscape.com
The paper received significant attention in early 1998, and was one factor in motivating Netscape Communications Corporation to release their popular Netscape Communicator Internet suite as free software. The open source label came out of a strategy session held on April 7, 1998 in Palo Alto in reaction to Netscape's January 1998 announcement of a source code release for Navigator (as Mozilla).
January 1998 was also the month that Netscape started the open source Mozilla project.

Concurrent Versions System

CVSConcurrent Version SystemConcurrent Versions System (CVS)
Revision control systems such as Concurrent Versions System (CVS) and later Subversion (SVN) and Git are examples of tools, often themselves open source, help manage the source code files and the changes to those files for a software project.
In addition to proprietary software developers, CVS became popular with the open-source software world and was released under the GNU General Public License.