Opera

opera singeroperasoperaticopera companybaroque operagrand operaopera singerscompanycontemporary operaHistory of opera
Opera (English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere ) is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theater.wikipedia
9,336 Related Articles

Libretto

librettistlibrettibook
Such a "work" (the literal translation of "opera") is typically a collaboration between a composer and a librettist and incorporates a number of the performing arts, such as acting, scenery, costume, and sometimes dance or ballet.
"booklet") is the text used in, or intended for, an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, oratorio, cantata or musical.

Theatre

theaterstagetheatrical
Opera (English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere ) is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theater.
The art forms of ballet and opera are also theatre and use many conventions such as acting, costumes and staging.

Opéra comique

opéra-comiqueopéras comiquesopéras-comiques
Originally understood as an entirely sung piece, in contrast to a play with songs, opera has come to include, including some that include spoken dialogue such as musical theater, Singspiel and Opéra comique.
Opéra comique (plural: opéras comiques) is a genre of French opera that contains spoken dialogue and arias.

Recitative

recitativessecco recitativeaccompagnato
In traditional number opera, singers employ two styles of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style and self-contained arias.
Recitative (, also known by its Italian name "recitativo" ) is a style of delivery (much used in operas, oratorios, and cantatas) in which a singer is allowed to adopt the rhythms of ordinary speech.

Opera house

opera houseshouseopera company
The performance is typically given in an opera house, accompanied by an orchestra or smaller musical ensemble, which since the early 19th century has been led by a conductor.
An opera house is a theatre building used for opera performances that consists of a stage, an orchestra pit, audience seating, and backstage facilities for costumes and set building.

Number opera

In traditional number opera, singers employ two styles of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style and self-contained arias.
A number opera (opera a numeri; Nummeroper) is an opera consisting of individual pieces of music ('numbers') which can be easily extracted from the larger work.

Singspiel

singspieleSong-playSyngespil
Originally understood as an entirely sung piece, in contrast to a play with songs, opera has come to include, including some that include spoken dialogue such as musical theater, Singspiel and Opéra comique.
A Singspiel (plural: Singspiele; literally "sing-play") is a form of German-language music drama, now regarded as a genre of opera.

Origins of opera

earliest operasearly history of operaFete
Opera originated in Italy at the end of the 16th century (with Jacopo Peri's mostly lost Dafne, produced in Florence in 1598) and soon spread through the rest of Europe: Heinrich Schütz in Germany, Jean-Baptiste Lully in France, and Henry Purcell in England all helped to establish their national traditions in the 17th century.
The art form known as opera originated in Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, though it drew upon older traditions of medieval and Renaissance courtly entertainment.

George Frideric Handel

HandelHändelHaendel
In the 18th century, Italian opera continued to dominate most of Europe (except France), attracting foreign composers such as George Frideric Handel.
George Frideric (or Frederick) Handel (born Georg Friedrich Händel ; 23 February 1685 (O.S.) [(N.S.) 5 March] – 14 April 1759) was a German, later British, Baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well-known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos.

Classical music

classicalWestern classical musicWestern classical
Opera is a key part of the Western classical music tradition.
Another difference is that whereas most popular styles adopt the song (strophic) form or a derivation of this form, classical music has been noted for its development of highly sophisticated forms of instrumental music such as the symphony, concerto, fugue, sonata, and mixed vocal and instrumental styles such as opera, cantata, and mass.

Dafne

DAFNE, in musicoriginal opera
Opera originated in Italy at the end of the 16th century (with Jacopo Peri's mostly lost Dafne, produced in Florence in 1598) and soon spread through the rest of Europe: Heinrich Schütz in Germany, Jean-Baptiste Lully in France, and Henry Purcell in England all helped to establish their national traditions in the 17th century.
Dafne is the earliest known work that, by modern standards, could be considered an opera.

Heinrich Schütz

SchützH. SchützSchutz
Opera originated in Italy at the end of the 16th century (with Jacopo Peri's mostly lost Dafne, produced in Florence in 1598) and soon spread through the rest of Europe: Heinrich Schütz in Germany, Jean-Baptiste Lully in France, and Henry Purcell in England all helped to establish their national traditions in the 17th century.
He wrote what is traditionally considered to be the first German opera, Dafne, performed at Torgau in 1627, the music of which has since been lost, along with nearly all of his ceremonial and theatrical scores.

Singing

vocalssingervocalist
Opera (English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere ) is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theater.
Different singing styles include art music such as opera and Chinese opera, Indian music and religious music styles such as gospel, traditional music styles, world music, jazz, blues, gazal and popular music styles such as pop, rock, electronic dance music and filmi (film songs).

Gioachino Rossini

RossiniGioacchino RossiniG. Rossini
The first third of the 19th century saw the high point of the bel canto style, with Gioachino Rossini, Gaetano Donizetti and Vincenzo Bellini all creating works that are still performed.
Gioachino Antonio Rossini (29 February 1792 – 13 November 1868) was an Italian composer who gained fame for his 39 operas, although he also wrote many songs, some chamber music and piano pieces, and some works of sacred music.

Don Giovanni

Donna AnnaDon OttavioZerlina
The most renowned figure of late 18th-century opera is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who began with opera seria but is most famous for his Italian comic operas, especially The Marriage of Figaro (Le nozze di Figaro), Don Giovanni, and Così fan tutte, as well as Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio), and The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflöte), landmarks in the German tradition.
Don Giovanni (K. 527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punished, namely Don Giovanni or The Libertine Punished) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Italian libretto by Lorenzo Da Ponte.

Grand opera

grand opéraballet-divertissementDuponchel
It also saw the advent of Grand Opera typified by the works of Auber and Meyerbeer.
Grand opera is a genre of 19th-century opera generally in four or five acts, characterized by large-scale casts and orchestras, and (in their original productions) lavish and spectacular design and stage effects, normally with plots based on or around dramatic historic events.

Giacomo Meyerbeer

MeyerbeerMeyerbeer, GiacomoG. Meyerbeer
It also saw the advent of Grand Opera typified by the works of Auber and Meyerbeer.
Giacomo Meyerbeer (born Jacob Liebmann Beer; 5 September 1791 – 2 May 1864) was a German opera composer of Jewish birth who has been described as perhaps the most successful stage composer of the nineteenth century.

Vincenzo Bellini

BelliniBellini, VincenzoV. Bellini
The first third of the 19th century saw the high point of the bel canto style, with Gioachino Rossini, Gaetano Donizetti and Vincenzo Bellini all creating works that are still performed.
Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (3 November 1801 – 23 September 1835) was an Italian opera composer, who was known for his long-flowing melodic lines for which he was named "the Swan of Catania".

Giuseppe Verdi

VerdiVerdi’sG. Verdi
The mid-to-late 19th century was a golden age of opera, led and dominated by Giuseppe Verdi in Italy and Richard Wagner in Germany.
Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (9 or 10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901) was an Italian opera composer.

Die Entführung aus dem Serail

The Abduction from the SeraglioBelmonteKonstanze
The most renowned figure of late 18th-century opera is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who began with opera seria but is most famous for his Italian comic operas, especially The Marriage of Figaro (Le nozze di Figaro), Don Giovanni, and Così fan tutte, as well as Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio), and The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflöte), landmarks in the German tradition.
Die Entführung aus dem Serail ( German: [ˈdɪ ʔɛntˈfyːʁʊŋ aʊ̯s dem zɛˈʁaɪ̯l]) (K. 384; The Abduction from the Seraglio; also known as Il Seraglio) is an opera Singspiel in three acts by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Giacomo Puccini

PucciniG. PucciniPuccini’s
The popularity of opera continued through the verismo era in Italy and contemporary French opera through to Giacomo Puccini and Richard Strauss in the early 20th century.
Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (22 December 1858 – 29 November 1924) was an Italian opera composer who has been called "the greatest composer of Italian opera after Verdi".

Aria

ariasariettearietta
In traditional number opera, singers employ two styles of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style and self-contained arias.
The typical context for arias is opera, but vocal arias also feature in oratorios and cantatas, sharing features of the operatic arias of their periods.

Verismo (music)

verismoverismo operaveristic
The popularity of opera continued through the verismo era in Italy and contemporary French opera through to Giacomo Puccini and Richard Strauss in the early 20th century.
In opera, verismo (, from vero, meaning "true") was a post-Romantic operatic tradition associated with Italian composers such as Pietro Mascagni, Ruggero Leoncavallo, Umberto Giordano, Francesco Cilea and Giacomo Puccini.

Russian opera

RussianRussiaopera
During the 19th century, parallel operatic traditions emerged in central and eastern Europe, particularly in Russia and Bohemia.
Russian opera (Russian: Ру́сская о́пера Rússkaya ópera) is the art of opera in Russia.

Richard Strauss

StraussR. StraussStrauss, Richard
The popularity of opera continued through the verismo era in Italy and contemporary French opera through to Giacomo Puccini and Richard Strauss in the early 20th century.
He is known for his operas, which include Der Rosenkavalier, Elektra, Die Frau ohne Schatten and Salome; his Lieder, especially his Four Last Songs; his tone poems, including Don Juan, Death and Transfiguration, Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Also sprach Zarathustra, Ein Heldenleben, Symphonia Domestica, and An Alpine Symphony; and other instrumental works such as Metamorphosen and his Oboe Concerto.