Operation Anthropoid

assassination of Reinhard Heydrichassassinationassassinatedassassination attemptthe assassinationordering his assassinationAnthropoidassassinate Reinhard Heydrichassassinated by Czech partisans in 1942assassination of general Heydrich
Operation Anthropoid was the code name for the assassination during World War II of Schutzstaffel (SS)-Obergruppenführer and General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office, RSHA), the combined security services of Nazi Germany, and acting Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.wikipedia
277 Related Articles

Reinhard Heydrich

HeydrichR. HeydrichReinhard Tristan Eugen Heydrich
Operation Anthropoid was the code name for the assassination during World War II of Schutzstaffel (SS)-Obergruppenführer and General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office, RSHA), the combined security services of Nazi Germany, and acting Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
Heydrich was critically wounded in Prague on 27 May 1942 as a result of Operation Anthropoid.

Reich Main Security Office

RSHAReichssicherheitshauptamtReich Security Main Office
Operation Anthropoid was the code name for the assassination during World War II of Schutzstaffel (SS)-Obergruppenführer and General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office, RSHA), the combined security services of Nazi Germany, and acting Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
Heydrich remained the RSHA chief until he was assassinated in 1942.

Special Operations Executive

SOES.O.E.Special Operations Executive (SOE)
The operation was carried out by Czechoslovak army-in-exile soldiers in Prague, on 27 May 1942, after preparation by the British Special Operations Executive with the approval of the Czechoslovak government-in-exile.
They also carried out some high-profile operations aimed mainly at the morale both of the Axis and occupied nations, such as Operation Anthropoid, the assassination in Prague of Reinhard Heydrich.

Jozef Gabčík

Gabčík
Warrant Officer Jozef Gabčík (Slovak) and Staff Sergeant Karel Svoboda (cs) (Czech) were chosen to carry out the operation on 28 October 1941 (Czechoslovakia's Independence Day), but Svoboda was replaced by Jan Kubiš (Czech) after he received a head injury during training.
Jozef Gabčík (8 April 1912 – 18 June 1942) was a Slovak soldier in the Czechoslovak army involved in Operation Anthropoid, the assassination of acting Reichsprotektor (Reich-Protector) of Bohemia and Moravia, SS Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich.

Jan Kubiš

Jan KubisKubiš
Warrant Officer Jozef Gabčík (Slovak) and Staff Sergeant Karel Svoboda (cs) (Czech) were chosen to carry out the operation on 28 October 1941 (Czechoslovakia's Independence Day), but Svoboda was replaced by Jan Kubiš (Czech) after he received a head injury during training.
Jan Kubiš (24 June 1913 – 18 June 1942) was a Czech soldier, one of a team of Czechoslovak British-trained paratroopers sent to eliminate acting Reichsprotektor (Reich-Protector) of Bohemia and Moravia, SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich, in 1942 as part of Operation Anthropoid.

Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

Bohemia and MoraviaProtectorateCzech Protectorate
Operation Anthropoid was the code name for the assassination during World War II of Schutzstaffel (SS)-Obergruppenführer and General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office, RSHA), the combined security services of Nazi Germany, and acting Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
On 4 June 1942, Heydrich died after being wounded by Czechoslovak Commandos in Operation Anthropoid.

Adolf Opálka

Adolf Opalka
They planned to pull a cable across the road that would stop Heydrich's car but, after waiting several hours, their commander, Lt. Adolf Opálka (from the group Out Distance), came to bring them back to Prague.
He was a member of the Czech sabotage group Out Distance, a World War II anti-Nazi resistance group, and a participant in Operation Anthropoid, the successful mission to kill Reinhard Heydrich.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
The exiled government of Czechoslovakia under President Edvard Beneš was under pressure from British intelligence, as there had been very little visible resistance since the occupation of the Sudeten regions of the country in 1938.
On 4 June 1942 Heydrich died after being wounded by an assassin in Operation Anthropoid.

Prague

PrahaPrague, Czech RepublicPrag
They landed near Nehvizdy east of Prague.
In 1942, Prague was witness to the assassination of one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany—Reinhard Heydrich—during Operation Anthropoid, accomplished by Czechoslovak national heroes Jozef Gabčík and Jan Kubiš.

Schutzstaffel

SSßNazi SS
Operation Anthropoid was the code name for the assassination during World War II of Schutzstaffel (SS)-Obergruppenführer and General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office, RSHA), the combined security services of Nazi Germany, and acting Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
Heydrich was attacked in Prague on 27 May 1942 by a British-trained team of Czech and Slovak soldiers who had been sent by the Czechoslovak government-in-exile to kill him in Operation Anthropoid.

Edvard Beneš

BenešPresident BenešBeneš, Edvard
The exiled government of Czechoslovakia under President Edvard Beneš was under pressure from British intelligence, as there had been very little visible resistance since the occupation of the Sudeten regions of the country in 1938. The Czechoslovaks undertook the operation to help confer legitimacy on Edvard Beneš's government-in-exile in London, as well as for retribution for Heydrich's brutally efficient rule.
In 1941, Beneš and František Moravec planned Operation Anthropoid to assassinate Reinhard Heydrich, a high-ranking German official who was responsible for suppressing Czech culture, and for deporting and executing members of the Czech resistance.

Code name

codenamecryptonymcodenamed
Operation Anthropoid was the code name for the assassination during World War II of Schutzstaffel (SS)-Obergruppenführer and General der Polizei Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Reich Main Security Office, RSHA), the combined security services of Nazi Germany, and acting Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.
Operation Anthropoid – assassination of top Nazi Reinhard Heydrich in Prague

Czechoslovak government-in-exile

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakgovernment-in-exile
The Czechoslovaks undertook the operation to help confer legitimacy on Edvard Beneš's government-in-exile in London, as well as for retribution for Heydrich's brutally efficient rule.
The success of this mission, Operation Anthropoid, caused Britain and Free France (itself a government-in-exile) to formally repudiate the Munich Agreement, thus conferring de jure legitimacy on the Beneš government as the continuation of the First Republic.

Lidice massacre

LidiceMassacre at Lidicecompletely destroyed in June 1942
On 9 June 1942, the Germans committed the Lidice massacre; 199 men were killed, 195 women were deported to Ravensbrück concentration camp and 95 children taken prisoner.
In reprisal for the assassination of Reich Protector Reinhard Heydrich in the late spring of 1942, all 173 males over 15 years of age from the village were executed on 10 June 1942.

Nehvizdy

They landed near Nehvizdy east of Prague.
On 29 December 1941 Czechoslovak paratroopers Gabčík and Kubiš sent by the Czech government-in-exile in London to assassinate Reinhard Heydrich were inserted near Nehvizdy (they overflew their predesignated target area near Pilsen by more than a hundred kilometres due to a navigational error).

Prague Castle

PragueCastle of Praguecastle
On 27 May 1942 at 10:30, Heydrich started his daily commute from his home in Panenské Břežany to his headquarters at Prague Castle.
Less than a year after assuming power, on May 27, 1942, Heydrich was ambushed during Operation Anthropoid, by British-trained Slovak and Czech resistance soldiers while on his way to the Castle, and died of his wounds - which became infected - a week later.

Sten

Sten gunSten gunsSten Mk II
As Heydrich's car slowed, Gabčík stepped in front of the vehicle and tried to open fire with his Sten submachine gun, but it jammed and failed to fire.
Czechoslovakia: Used by Czechoslovak troops for Operation Anthropoid; the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich. The gun jammed and failed to fire.

Out Distance

They planned to pull a cable across the road that would stop Heydrich's car but, after waiting several hours, their commander, Lt. Adolf Opálka (from the group Out Distance), came to bring them back to Prague.
First Lieutenant Adolf Opálka, and Karel Čurda went to Prague and joined Operation Anthropoid, a group preparing to assassinate Reinhard Heydrich.

Karl Gebhardt

Dr. Karl Franz GebhardtKarl Franz Gebhardt
Heydrich's superior, Heinrich Himmler, sent his personal physician, Karl Gebhardt, who flew to Prague and arrived that evening.
On 27 May 1942, Himmler ordered Gebhardt dispatched to Prague in order to attend to Reinhard Heydrich, who was wounded by an anti-tank grenade during Operation Anthropoid earlier that day.

Josef Valčík

Josef Valcik
Josef Valčík (from group Silver A) was positioned about 100 metres (109 yards) north of Gabčík and Kubiš as lookout for the approaching car.
Josef Valčík (2 November 1914 – 18 June 1942) was a Czechoslovak British-trained soldier and member of the Resistance in German-occupied Czechoslovakia who took part in the firefight during the aftermath of the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich by Jozef Gabčík and Jan Kubiš, code named Operation Anthropoid.

Ležáky

Massacre in Ležáky
The Czech village of Ležáky was also destroyed, because a radio transmitter belonging to the Silver A team was found there.
Some were sent to assassinate Reinhard Heydrich in an action known as Operation Anthropoid.

Paul Fildes

Sir Paul Gordon Fildes
According to this theory, the No. 73 anti-tank hand grenade used in the attack had been modified to contain botulinum toxin, according Paul Fildes, a Porton Down botulism researcher.
Fildes asserted that he assisted with Operation Anthropoid the assassination of top Nazi Reinhard Heydrich in Prague by providing the Czech agents of the Special Operations Executive with modified No. 73 Grenades filled with botulin toxin.

Kobylisy Shooting Range

military area Prague-KobylisyPrague-Kobylisy
On 4 September 1942, the bishop, the church's priests and senior lay leaders were taken to Kobylisy Shooting Range in a northern suburb of Prague and shot.
During the Nazi occupation it was used for mass executions as part of retaliatory measures against the Czech people after the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich in 1942.

Hitler's Madman

Hitler's Madman (1943)
Hitler's Madman is a 1943 World War II film about the assassination of Nazi Reinhard Heydrich and the Lidice massacre revenge taken by the Germans.

Lidice

Lidice massacreCzech townLidice Tour
Intelligence falsely linked the assassins to the village of Lidice.
Lidice was chosen as a target for reprisals in the wake of the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, because its residents were suspected of harbouring local resistance partisans and were falsely associated with aiding team members of Operation Anthropoid.