Operation Atlantic

AtlanticFaubourg de VaucellesOperations ''AtlanticOperations Atlantic
Operation Atlantic (18–21 July 1944) was a Canadian offensive during the Battle of Normandy in the Second World War.wikipedia
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Operation Goodwood

GoodwoodBourguébus Ridgeadvancing towards Vire
The offensive, launched in conjunction with Operation Goodwood by the Second Army, was part of operations to seize the French city of Caen and vicinity from German forces.
On 18 July, the British I Corps conducted an advance to secure a series of villages and the eastern flank of VIII Corps and to the west, the II Canadian Corps launched Operation Atlantic, synchronised with Goodwood, to capture the rest of Caen south of the Orne River.

6th Canadian Infantry Brigade

6th Infantry Brigade6th6th Brigade
It was initially successful, with gains made on the flanks of the Orne River near Saint-André-sur-Orne but an attack by the 4th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, against strongly defended German positions on Verrières Ridge to the south was a costly failure.

2nd Canadian Division during World War II

2nd Canadian Infantry Division2ndCanadian 2nd Infantry Division
It was initially successful, with gains made on the flanks of the Orne River near Saint-André-sur-Orne but an attack by the 4th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, against strongly defended German positions on Verrières Ridge to the south was a costly failure. He planned the operation as a two-pronged assault, relying on the 2nd and 3rd Canadian Infantry Divisions to capture Vaucelles, Colombelles, and the opposite banks of the Orne River.
Operation Atlantic, launched on 18July alongside Goodwood, had the objectives of securing the western bank of the Orne River and Verrières Ridge.

Operation Overlord

Battle of NormandyNormandyNormandy Campaign
Operation Atlantic (18–21 July 1944) was a Canadian offensive during the Battle of Normandy in the Second World War.
Operation Atlantic and Operation Goodwood captured the rest of Caen and the high ground to the south from 18 to 21 July, by when the city was nearly destroyed.

Operation Charnwood

CharnwoodOperation ''CharnwoodBombing of Caen
Several days later Second Army launched a new offensive, codenamed Operation Charnwood, against Caen.
The Allies maintained the initiative and began Operation Jupiter the next day and Operation Goodwood and Operation Atlantic a week later, in which the rest of Caen was secured.

Sword Beach

Swordone of the beaches
The capture of the historic Norman town of Caen, while "ambitious", was the most important D-Day objective assigned to British Lieutenant-General John Crocker's I Corps and its component British 3rd Infantry Division, which landed on Sword on 6 June 1944.
The southern half of Caen was only captured 12 days later by Canadian infantry during Operation Atlantic.

Second Army (United Kingdom)

Second ArmyBritish Second ArmyBritish 2nd Army
On 10 July General Bernard Montgomery, commander of all Allied ground forces in Normandy, held a meeting with Lieutenant-Generals Miles Dempsey and Omar Bradley, respectively the commanders of British Second Army and the United States First Army, at his headquarters to discuss the next attacks to be launched by 21st Army Group following the conclusion of Operation Charnwood and the failure of the First Army's initial breakout offensive.
However, due to various factors the city was not captured until mid-July during Operation Atlantic, conducted by Canadian troops under the command of Second Army.

Battle for Caen

CaenBattle of Caenallied attacks on Caen
The Caen suburbs south of the river were captured by the II Canadian Corps during Operation Atlantic (18–20 July).

The Essex Scottish Regiment

Essex Scottish RegimentEssex ScottishEssex Fusiliers
Counterattacks by two Panzer divisions forced the South Saskatchewans back past their start line and crashed into their supporting battalion, the Essex Scottish, who lost over 300 men as they struggled to hold back the 12th SS Panzer Division.
The Essex Scottish later participated in Operation Atlantic and was slaughtered attempting to take Verrières Ridge on July 21.

Operation Perch

AuthieOperation Wild OatsPerch
Operation Perch, a pincer attack by I and XXX Corps, began on 7 June, with the intention of encircling Caen from the east and west.
Caen north of the Orne was captured during Operation Charnwood (8–9 July) and the north bank suburbs were taken during Operation Atlantic (18–20 July).

Battle of Verrières Ridge

Verrières RidgeBattle of Verrieres RidgeBourguébus Ridge
It was initially successful, with gains made on the flanks of the Orne River near Saint-André-sur-Orne but an attack by the 4th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, against strongly defended German positions on Verrières Ridge to the south was a costly failure.
The battle was part of the British and Canadian attempts to break out of Caen, and took place from 19 to 25 July 1944, being part of both Operation Atlantic (18–21 July) and Operation Spring (25–27 July).

II Canadian Corps

Canadian II Corps2nd Canadian Army Corps2nd Canadian Corps
Lt. Gen. Guy Simonds' II Canadian Corps would launch an attack, codenamed Operation Atlantic, on the western flank of VIII Corps to liberate Colombelles and the remaining portion of Caen south of the Orne river.

3rd Canadian Division

3rd Canadian Infantry Division3rdCanadian 3rd Infantry Division
He planned the operation as a two-pronged assault, relying on the 2nd and 3rd Canadian Infantry Divisions to capture Vaucelles, Colombelles, and the opposite banks of the Orne River.
On 18 July, Operation Atlantic was launched, the Canadian advance that would coincide with Operation Goodwood, happening further east by British forces in the area south of Caen.

Operation Cobra

breakout from NormandyBattle of Normandythe Allied breakthrough at Saint Lo in July 1944
Montgomery approved Operation Cobra, a major break out attempt to be launched by the First Army on 18 July, and ordered Dempsey to "go on hitting: drawing the German strength, especially the armour, onto yourself - so as to ease the way for Brad[ley]".
Simultaneously, the II Canadian Corps on the western flank of Goodwood began Operation Atlantic to strengthen the Allied foothold along the banks of the Orne river and take Verrières Ridge to the south of Caen.

Guy Simonds

G.G. Simonds
Lt. Gen. Guy Simonds' II Canadian Corps would launch an attack, codenamed Operation Atlantic, on the western flank of VIII Corps to liberate Colombelles and the remaining portion of Caen south of the Orne river.
Once II Corps was activated, Simonds would direct four major attacks during the Battle of Normandy in five weeks: Operations Atlantic (the Canadian part of Operation Goodwood), Spring, Totalize and Tractable.

Operation Spring

SpringCrête de Verrières-Tilly-la-Campagne
As a result, Lieutenant-General Guy Simonds formulated the plans for Operation Spring.
On July 20, 1944, the II Canadian Corps under General Guy Simonds, attempted a similar offensive, codenamed Operation Atlantic.

Operation Epsom

EpsomOdonBattle of 'Scottish Corridor
On 26 June the British launched Operation Epsom, an attempt by Lieutenant-General Richard O'Connor's VIII Corps to outflank Caen's defenses by crossing the River Odon to the west of the city then circling eastward.
In a frontal assault the northern half of the city was captured, with the remaining portions being taken during Operations Atlantic and Goodwood in the third week of July.

Operation Windsor

CaenCarpiquetWindsor
Charnwood incorporated a postponed attack on Carpiquet, originally planned for Epsom as Operation Ottawa but now codenamed Operation Windsor.
On 18 July British and Canadian forces launched Operation Atlantic and Operation Goodwood in which the Canadians captured the Caen districts on the south bank and the British captured ground to the east and south of the city.

The South Saskatchewan Regiment

South Saskatchewan RegimentSouth Saskatchewans
Units of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada, supporting the South Saskatchewan Regiment of the 2nd Division, were able to secure a position in St. André-sur-Orne in the early hours of 20 July but were soon pinned down by German infantry and tanks.
The South Saskatchewan Regiment fought in the Dieppe Raid of 1942, Operation Atlantic, Operation Spring, Operation Totalize, Operation Tractable, and the recapture of Dieppe in 1944.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Operation Atlantic (18–21 July 1944) was a Canadian offensive during the Battle of Normandy in the Second World War.

Caen

Caen, France Caen in NormandyCaen commune
The offensive, launched in conjunction with Operation Goodwood by the Second Army, was part of operations to seize the French city of Caen and vicinity from German forces. The capture of the historic Norman town of Caen, while "ambitious", was the most important D-Day objective assigned to British Lieutenant-General John Crocker's I Corps and its component British 3rd Infantry Division, which landed on Sword on 6 June 1944.

Orne (river)

River OrneOrneOrne River
It was initially successful, with gains made on the flanks of the Orne River near Saint-André-sur-Orne but an attack by the 4th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, against strongly defended German positions on Verrières Ridge to the south was a costly failure.

Saint-André-sur-Orne

St André-sur-OrneSt. Andre sur OrneSt. André-sur-Orne
It was initially successful, with gains made on the flanks of the Orne River near Saint-André-sur-Orne but an attack by the 4th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, against strongly defended German positions on Verrières Ridge to the south was a costly failure.

4th Canadian Infantry Brigade

4th4th Canadian Brigade4th Infantry Brigade (Canada)
It was initially successful, with gains made on the flanks of the Orne River near Saint-André-sur-Orne but an attack by the 4th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, against strongly defended German positions on Verrières Ridge to the south was a costly failure.

Normandy landings

D-DayD-Day landingsOperation Neptune
The capture of the historic Norman town of Caen, while "ambitious", was the most important D-Day objective assigned to British Lieutenant-General John Crocker's I Corps and its component British 3rd Infantry Division, which landed on Sword on 6 June 1944.