Opium den

opium densopium houses
An opium den was an establishment where opium was sold and smoked.wikipedia
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Opium

opium tradeopium addictionraw opium
An opium den was an establishment where opium was sold and smoked.
Chinese emigrants to cities such as San Francisco, London, and New York brought with them the Chinese manner of opium smoking, and the social traditions of the opium den.

Prohibition of drugs

illegal drugsillegal drugdrug prohibition
Despite this, the 1870s attracted many non-Chinese residents to San Francisco's dens, prompting the city fathers to enact the nation's first anti-drug law, an 1875 ordinance banning opium dens.
In the United States, the first drug law was passed in San Francisco in 1875, banning the smoking of opium in opium dens.

Vancouver

Vancouver, British ColumbiaVancouver, BCVancouver, Canada
However, a fair amount of opium was consumed in the opium dens to be found in the Chinatowns of Victoria and Vancouver.
Two of the claimants were opium manufacturers, and after further investigation, King found that white women were reportedly frequenting opium dens as well as Chinese men.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Edwin DroodMystery of Edwin DroodDrood
A character from Charles Dickens' last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870) sets the scene: "O my poor head! I makes my pipes of old penny ink-bottles, ye see, deary – this is one – and I fits-in a mouthpiece, this way,and I takes my mixter out of this thimble with this little horn spoon; and so I fills, deary. Ah, my poor nerves!"
The novel begins as John Jasper leaves a London opium den.

The Man with the Twisted Lip

The Twisted Lip
Some of the literary elite of the time including Arthur Conan Doyle (see "The Man with the Twisted Lip") and Dickens himself visited the area, although whether they themselves took up the "pipe" has remained undisclosed.
Frantic with worry, she begs Dr. Watson to fetch him home from the opium den where he goes.

Sherlock Holmes

HolmesSherlockHolmesian
Although Holmes also dabbles in morphine, he expresses strong disapproval when he visits an opium den; both drugs were legal in 19th-century England.

Charles Dickens

DickensDickensianDickens, Charles
A character from Charles Dickens' last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870) sets the scene: "O my poor head! I makes my pipes of old penny ink-bottles, ye see, deary – this is one – and I fits-in a mouthpiece, this way,and I takes my mixter out of this thimble with this little horn spoon; and so I fills, deary. Ah, my poor nerves!"
It was fashionable in the 1860s to 'do the slums' and, in company, Dickens visited opium dens in Shadwell, where he witnessed an elderly addict known as "Laskar Sal", who formed the model for the "Opium Sal" subsequently featured in his mystery novel, Edwin Drood.

Poirot's Early Cases

Double SinHow Does Your Garden Grow?The Chocolate Box
The taxi driver who took both men to a known opium den said Lester alone emerged looking ill half an hour later.

The Blue Lotus

Le Lotus bleu
Tintin agrees, and spies on Mitsuhirato at the Blue Lotus opium den.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Dorian GrayPicture of Dorian GrayLord Henry Wotton
To escape the guilt of his crime, Dorian goes to an opium den, where James Vane is unknowingly present.

The Mystery of Dr. Fu-Manchu

The Mystery of Dr. Fu ManchuThe Insidious Dr Fu Manchuseries of novels
Fu Manchu is pursued from the opium dens of Limehouse in the East End of London to various country estates.

Treehouse of Horror XV

Eliza SimpsonfifteenthThe Ned Zone
Bartley knows where to find Burns and tracks him down at Mao's (Moe's) Den of Inequity, an opium den.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America, and France.

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America, and France.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America, and France.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America, and France.

Western world

WesternWestthe West
Throughout the West, opium dens were frequented by and associated with the Chinese, because the establishments were usually run by Chinese who supplied the opium as well as prepared it for visiting non-Chinese smokers.

Chinese people

ChineseChinaChinese descent
Throughout the West, opium dens were frequented by and associated with the Chinese, because the establishments were usually run by Chinese who supplied the opium as well as prepared it for visiting non-Chinese smokers.

Opium pipe

opium pipespipe dreampipe of opium
Patrons would recline in order to hold the long opium pipes over oil lamps that would heat the drug until it vaporized, allowing the smoker to inhale the vapors.

Opium lamp

oil lampvaporization
Patrons would recline in order to hold the long opium pipes over oil lamps that would heat the drug until it vaporized, allowing the smoker to inhale the vapors.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In urban areas of the United States, particularly on the West Coast, there were opium dens that mirrored the best to be found in China, with luxurious trappings and female attendants.

West Coast of the United States

West CoastUnited States West CoastPacific Coast
In urban areas of the United States, particularly on the West Coast, there were opium dens that mirrored the best to be found in China, with luxurious trappings and female attendants.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
For the working class, there were many low-end dens with sparse furnishings.

California Gold Rush

Gold RushForty-niners49er
Opium smoking arrived in North America with the large influx of Chinese, who came to participate in the California Gold Rush.