Opium den

opium densopium houses
An opium den was an establishment where opium was sold and smoked.wikipedia
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Opium

opium tradeopium addictionraw opium
An opium den was an establishment where opium was sold and smoked.
Global regulation of opium began with the stigmatization of Chinese immigrants and opium dens in San Francisco, California.

Prohibition of drugs

illegal drugdrug prohibitionprohibition
Despite this, the 1870s attracted many non-Chinese residents to San Francisco's dens, prompting the city fathers to enact the nation's first anti-drug law, an 1875 ordinance banning opium dens.
In the United States, the first drug law was passed in San Francisco in 1875, banning the smoking of opium in opium dens.

Vancouver

Vancouver, British ColumbiaVancouver, BCVancouver, Canada
However, a fair amount of opium was consumed in the opium dens to be found in the Chinatowns of Victoria and Vancouver.
Two of the claimants were opium manufacturers, and after further investigation, King found that white women were reportedly frequenting opium dens as well as Chinese men.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood

novelDroodEdwin Drood
A character from Charles Dickens' last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870) sets the scene: "O my poor head! I makes my pipes of old penny ink-bottles, ye see, deary – this is one – and I fits-in a mouthpiece, this way,and I takes my mixter out of this thimble with this little horn spoon; and so I fills, deary. Ah, my poor nerves!"
The novel begins as John Jasper leaves a London opium den.

The Man with the Twisted Lip

The Twisted Lip
Some of the literary elite of the time including Arthur Conan Doyle (see "The Man with the Twisted Lip") and Dickens himself visited the area, although whether they themselves took up the "pipe" has remained undisclosed. In Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes story "The Man with the Twisted Lip", Dr. Watson goes to an opium den in the East End of London to find Isa Whitney.
Frantic with worry, she begs Dr. Watson to fetch him home from the opium den where he goes.

Chinatown

China TownChinese communitiesChinatowns
Chinese immigrants first established Chinatowns in Victoria and Vancouver in British Columbia, and here too, opium dens were common in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Many early Chinatowns featured large numbers of Chinese-owned chop suey restaurants, laundry businesses, and opium dens, until around the mid-20th century when most of these businesses began to disappear.

Sherlock Holmes

HolmesSherlockHolmesian
In Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes story "The Man with the Twisted Lip", Dr. Watson goes to an opium den in the East End of London to find Isa Whitney.
Although Holmes also dabbles in morphine, he expresses strong disapproval when he visits an opium den; both drugs were legal in 19th-century England.

Charles Dickens

DickensDickensianDickens, Charles
A character from Charles Dickens' last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870) sets the scene: "O my poor head! I makes my pipes of old penny ink-bottles, ye see, deary – this is one – and I fits-in a mouthpiece, this way,and I takes my mixter out of this thimble with this little horn spoon; and so I fills, deary. Ah, my poor nerves!"
It was fashionable in the 1860s to 'do the slums' and, in company, Dickens visited opium dens in Shadwell, where he witnessed an elderly addict known as "Laskar Sal", who formed the model for the "Opium Sal" subsequently featured in his mystery novel, Edwin Drood.

Poirot's Early Cases

Double SinHow Does Your Garden Grow?The Chocolate Box
In Agatha Christie's magazine short story "The Lost Mine"(1923), Hercule Poirot is forced, much against his will, to conduct part of his investigation in a Limehouse opium den. The story appeared in book form in the American version of Poirot Investigates (1925) and in the UK in Poirot's Early Cases (1974).
The taxi driver who took both men to a known opium den said Lester alone emerged looking ill half an hour later.

The Blue Lotus

In Hergé's The Adventures of Tintin story The Blue Lotus (1934–1935), the main character Tintin is involved in infiltrating opium dens.
Tintin agrees, and spies on Mitsuhirato at the Blue Lotus opium den.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Dorian GrayPicture of Dorian GrayPortrait of Dorian Gray
In Oscar Wilde's novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Dorian visits the opium dens of London when indulging in the pleasures of life whether moral or immoral, having been influenced by the hedonistic outlook on life of Lord Henry Wotton.
To escape the guilt of his crime, Dorian goes to an opium den, where James Vane is unknowingly present.

The Mystery of Dr. Fu-Manchu

In Sax Rohmer's novel The Mystery of Dr. Fu-Manchu (1913), Nayland Smith and Dr Petrie enter Singapore Charlie's Thames-side opium den in search of Dr Fu Manchu and his henchmen.
Fu Manchu is pursued from the opium dens of Limehouse in the East End of London to various country estates.

Treehouse of Horror XV

fifteenthThe Ned ZoneXV
In The Simpsons episode "Treehouse of Horror XV" several characters, most notably Ralph and Mr. Burns, are shown smoking opium in an opium den in 19th century London.
Bartley knows where to find Burns and tracks him down at Mao's (Moe's) Den of Inequity, an opium den.

Nights in Ballygran

In "Boardwalk Empire" episode "Nights in Ballygran", Jimmy Darmody is shown smoking opium at an opium den in Chinatown.
Jimmy offers to pay for her keep, but realizes he cannot afford to. Pearl seems to understand her predicament: later that night, she drunkenly flaunts her scarred face in the lounge and, after a last kiss with Jimmy, finally shoots herself while he is washing up. Subsequently, Jimmy visits an opium den in Chinatown.

China

🇨🇳ChinesePeople's Republic of China
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America and France.

Southeast Asia

south-east AsiaSoutheastSouth East Asia
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America and France.

North America

NorthNAAmerica
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America and France.

France

🇫🇷FrenchFRA
Opium dens were prevalent in many parts of the world in the 19th century, most notably China, Southeast Asia, North America and France.

Western world

WesternWestthe West
Throughout the West, opium dens were frequented by and associated with the Chinese, because the establishments were usually run by Chinese who supplied the opium as well as prepared it for visiting non-Chinese smokers.

Chinese people

ChineseChinaethnic Chinese
Throughout the West, opium dens were frequented by and associated with the Chinese, because the establishments were usually run by Chinese who supplied the opium as well as prepared it for visiting non-Chinese smokers.

Opium pipe

opium pipespipe dreampipe of opium
Patrons would recline in order to hold the long opium pipes over oil lamps that would heat the drug until it vaporized, allowing the smoker to inhale the vapors.

Opium lamp

oil lampvaporization
Patrons would recline in order to hold the long opium pipes over oil lamps that would heat the drug until it vaporized, allowing the smoker to inhale the vapors.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
In urban areas of the United States, particularly on the West Coast, there were opium dens that mirrored the best to be found in China, with luxurious trappings and female attendants.

West Coast of the United States

West CoastPacific CoastU.S. West Coast
In urban areas of the United States, particularly on the West Coast, there were opium dens that mirrored the best to be found in China, with luxurious trappings and female attendants.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
For the working class, there were many low-end dens with sparse furnishings.