Optical disc drive

optical driveCD driveDVD driveoptical disk driveoptical disc recorderCD burnerCD recorderCD writerCD/DVD drivedrive
In computing, an optical disc drive (ODD) is a disc drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible light spectrum as part of the process of reading or writing data to or from optical discs.wikipedia
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Disk storage

disk drivediskdisks
In computing, an optical disc drive (ODD) is a disc drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible light spectrum as part of the process of reading or writing data to or from optical discs.
Notable types are the hard disk drive (HDD) containing a non-removable disk, the floppy disk drive (FDD) and its removable floppy disk, and various optical disc drives (ODD) and associated optical disc media.

Laser

laserslaser beamlaser light
In computing, an optical disc drive (ODD) is a disc drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible light spectrum as part of the process of reading or writing data to or from optical discs.
Lasers are used in optical disk drives, laser printers, barcode scanners, DNA sequencing instruments, fiber-optic and free-space optical communication, laser surgery and skin treatments, cutting and welding materials, military and law enforcement devices for marking targets and measuring range and speed, and in laser lighting displays for entertainment.

Optical disc

optical mediaoptical data storageoptical discs
In computing, an optical disc drive (ODD) is a disc drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible light spectrum as part of the process of reading or writing data to or from optical discs.
The data is stored on the disc with a laser or stamping machine, and can be accessed when the data path is illuminated with a laser diode in an optical disc drive which spins the disc at speeds of about 200 to 4,000 RPM or more, depending on the drive type, disc format, and the distance of the read head from the center of the disc (inner tracks are read at a higher disc speed).

DVD recorder

DVD burnerDVDDVDR
Optical disc drives are an integral part of standalone appliances such as CD players, DVD players, Blu-ray disc players, DVD recorders, certain desktop video game consoles, such as Sony PlayStation 4, Microsoft Xbox One, Nintendo Wii U, and Sony PlayStation 3, and certain portable video game consoles, such as Sony PlayStation Portable.
A DVD recorder is an optical disc recorder that uses optical disc recording technologies to digitally record analog or digital signals onto blank writable DVD media.

USB flash drive

flash driveUSB flash drivesUSB drive
USB flash drives, high-capacity, small, and inexpensive, are suitable where read/write capability is required.
USB drives with USB 2.0 support can store more data and transfer faster than much larger optical disc drives like CD-RW or DVD-RW drives and can be read by many other systems such as the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, DVD players, automobile entertainment systems, and in a number of handheld devices such as smartphones and tablet computers, though the electronically similar SD card is better suited for those devices.

Blu-ray Disc recordable

BD-RBD-REBD Recordable
An optical disk recorder encodes (also known as burning) data onto a recordable CD-R, DVD-R, DVD+R, or BD-R disc (called a blank) by selectively heating parts of an organic dye layer with a laser.
Blu-ray Disc Recordable (BD-R) refers to two direct to disc optical disc recording technologies that can be recorded on to an optical disc with an optical disc recorder.

Constant linear velocity

CLVzoned constant linear velocitylinear velocity
This led to optical drives—until recently—operating with a constant linear velocity (CLV).
In optical storage, constant linear velocity (CLV) is a qualifier for the rated speed of an optical disc drive, and may also be applied to the writing speed of recordable discs.

Compact disc

CDCDsCD single
Compact discs, DVDs, and Blu-ray discs are common types of optical media which can be read and recorded by such drives.
The write laser of the CD recorder changes the colour of the dye to allow the read laser of a standard CD player to see the data, just as it would with a standard stamped disc.

Serial ATA

SATAeSATAmSATA
Most internal drives for personal computers, servers, and workstations are designed to fit in a standard 5.25" drive bay and connect to their host via an ATA or SATA interface. Additionally, there may be digital and analog outputs for audio. The outputs may be connected via a header cable to the sound card or the motherboard. At one time, computer software resembling CD players controlled playback of the CD. Today the information is extracted from the disc as data, to be played back or converted to other file formats.
Serial ATA (SATA, abbreviated from Serial AT Attachment) is a computer bus interface that connects host bus adapters to mass storage devices such as hard disk drives, optical drives, and solid-state drives.

SCSI

SASISmall Computer System InterfaceShugart Associates System Interface
Drives with SCSI interface were made, but they are less common and tend to be more expensive, because of the cost of their interface chipsets, more complex SCSI connectors, and small volume of sales.
SCSI is most commonly used for hard disk drives and tape drives, but it can connect a wide range of other devices, including scanners and CD drives, although not all controllers can handle all devices.

Parallel ATA

IDEATAPATA
Most internal drives for personal computers, servers, and workstations are designed to fit in a standard 5.25" drive bay and connect to their host via an ATA or SATA interface. Additionally, there may be digital and analog outputs for audio. The outputs may be connected via a header cable to the sound card or the motherboard. At one time, computer software resembling CD players controlled playback of the CD. Today the information is extracted from the disc as data, to be played back or converted to other file formats.
Parallel ATA (PATA), originally, is an interface standard for the connection of storage devices such as hard disk drives, floppy disk drives, and optical disc drives in computers.

CD player

CD changerCD playersCompact Disc player
Optical disc drives are an integral part of standalone appliances such as CD players, DVD players, Blu-ray disc players, DVD recorders, certain desktop video game consoles, such as Sony PlayStation 4, Microsoft Xbox One, Nintendo Wii U, and Sony PlayStation 3, and certain portable video game consoles, such as Sony PlayStation Portable. Most internal drives for personal computers, servers, and workstations are designed to fit in a standard 5.25" drive bay and connect to their host via an ATA or SATA interface. Additionally, there may be digital and analog outputs for audio. The outputs may be connected via a header cable to the sound card or the motherboard. At one time, computer software resembling CD players controlled playback of the CD. Today the information is extracted from the disc as data, to be played back or converted to other file formats.

DVD

DVD-ROMDVDsDVD-9
Compact discs, DVDs, and Blu-ray discs are common types of optical media which can be read and recorded by such drives.
Blank recordable DVD discs (DVD-R and DVD+R) can be recorded once using a DVD recorder and then function as a DVD-ROM.

CD-R

CDRrecordable CDCD-Rs
An optical disk recorder encodes (also known as burning) data onto a recordable CD-R, DVD-R, DVD+R, or BD-R disc (called a blank) by selectively heating parts of an organic dye layer with a laser.

CD-ROM

CDCD-ROM driveCD-ROM XA
The CD-ROM format was developed by Sony and Denon, introduced in 1984, as an extension of Compact Disc Digital Audio and adapted to hold any form of digital data.

Removable media

portable mediaremovable diskremovable
This was acceptable for archival purposes, but limited the general convenience of CD-R and CD-RW discs as a removable storage medium.

Optical disc recording technologies

optical disc recording technologyoverburnOverburning
In response, manufacturers of CD recorders began shipping drives with "buffer underrun protection" (under various trade names, such as Sanyo's "BURN-Proof", Ricoh's "JustLink" and Yamaha's "Lossless Link").
Optical disc authoring requires a number of different optical disc recorder technologies working in tandem, from the optical disc media to the firmware to the control electronics of the optical disc drive.

Parallel port

parallelparallel interfaceprinter port
Other uses included optical disc drives such as CD readers and writers, Zip drives, scanners, external modems, gamepads, and joysticks.

Blu-ray

Blu-ray DiscBDBlu-ray 3D
Compact discs, DVDs, and Blu-ray discs are common types of optical media which can be read and recorded by such drives.
"Blu-ray Disc recordable" (BD-R) refers to two optical disc formats that can be recorded with an optical disc recorder.

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
Most internal drives for personal computers, servers, and workstations are designed to fit in a standard 5.25" drive bay and connect to their host via an ATA or SATA interface. Additionally, there may be digital and analog outputs for audio. The outputs may be connected via a header cable to the sound card or the motherboard. At one time, computer software resembling CD players controlled playback of the CD. Today the information is extracted from the disc as data, to be played back or converted to other file formats.
A typical desktop computer consists of a computer case (or "tower"), a metal chassis that holds the power supply, motherboard, hard disk drive, and often an optical disc drive.

Yamaha Corporation

YamahaYamaha Music CommunicationsYamaha Music
In response, manufacturers of CD recorders began shipping drives with "buffer underrun protection" (under various trade names, such as Sanyo's "BURN-Proof", Ricoh's "JustLink" and Yamaha's "Lossless Link").
In 1988, Yamaha shipped the world's first CD recorder.

Combo drive

combo (CD-RW/DVD-ROM) drives
During the times of combo (CD-RW/DVD-ROM) drives, an additional speed rating (e.g. the 16× in 52×/32×/52×/16×) is designated for DVD-ROM media reading operations.
The device was created as a mid-range option between a CD burner and a DVD burner, which at the time the combo drive was introduced was generally an expensive option costing in excess of US$300 a unit.

Optical disc authoring

Optical disc authoring softwareburningburned
CD recording on personal computers was originally a batch-oriented task in that it required specialised authoring software to create an "image" of the data to record and to record it to disc in the one session.
Authoring is commonly done in software on computers with optical disc recorders.

Computing

computer technologycomputing technologyapplied computing
In computing, an optical disc drive (ODD) is a disc drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible light spectrum as part of the process of reading or writing data to or from optical discs.

Electromagnetic spectrum

spectrumspectraspectral
In computing, an optical disc drive (ODD) is a disc drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible light spectrum as part of the process of reading or writing data to or from optical discs.