A woman smoking a cigarette, the most common method of tobacco smoking
Oral cancer on the side of the tongue, a common site along with the floor of the mouth
Aztec women are handed flowers and smoking tubes before eating at a banquet, Florentine Codex, 16th century.
Swelling of the right neck from the spread of oral cancer.
Gentlemen Smoking and Playing Backgammon in an Interior by Dirck Hals, 1627
Ulceration on the left lower lip caused by cancer
Bonsack's cigarette rolling machine, as shown on U.S. patent 238,640
Stall selling betel quid
A lengthy study conducted in order to establish the strong association necessary for legislative action (US cigarette consumption per person blue, male lung cancer rate brown)
Oral leukoplakia (white patch) on the left tongue. Proven to be severe dysplasia on biopsy
Tendu Patta (Leaf) collection for Beedi industries
A large squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue as seen on CT imaging
A graph that shows the efficiency of smoking as a way to absorb nicotine compared to other forms of intake.
Histopathologic appearance of a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma specimen. Hematoxylin-eosin stain. p16 positive, EBV negative
Sigmund Freud, whose doctor assisted his suicide because of oral cancer caused by smoking
Spread of cancer beyond the capsule of a lymph node (ENE+).
Common adverse effects of tobacco smoking. The more common effects are in bold face.
Post-operative image after removal of oral cancer with part of the mandible (feeding tube in nose)
Skull with a burning cigarette, by Vincent van Gogh.
Common scar line after cervical lymph node dissection
An enclosed smoking area in a Japanese train station. Notice the air vent on the roof.
Radiation treatment
Deaths from mouth and oropharynx cancers per million people in 2012
A beagle with oral cancer.

Risk factors include tobacco and alcohol use.

- Oral cancer

Tobacco use leads most commonly to diseases affecting the heart and lungs, with smoking being a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), emphysema, and various types and subtypes of cancers (particularly lung cancer, cancers of the oropharynx, larynx, and mouth, esophageal and pancreatic cancer).

- Tobacco smoking
A woman smoking a cigarette, the most common method of tobacco smoking

1 related topic

Alpha

A coronal CT scan showing a malignant mesothelioma
Legend: → tumor ←, ✱ central pleural effusion, 1 & 3 lungs, 2 spine, 4 ribs, 5 aorta, 6 spleen, 7 & 8 kidneys, 9 liver

Cancer

Group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.

Group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.

A coronal CT scan showing a malignant mesothelioma
Legend: → tumor ←, ✱ central pleural effusion, 1 & 3 lungs, 2 spine, 4 ribs, 5 aorta, 6 spleen, 7 & 8 kidneys, 9 liver
Symptoms of cancer metastasis depend on the location of the tumor.
The GHS Hazard pictogram for carcinogenic substances
Share of cancer deaths attributed to tobacco in 2016.
The incidence of lung cancer is highly correlated with smoking.
Cancers are caused by a series of mutations. Each mutation alters the behavior of the cell somewhat.
The central role of DNA damage and epigenetic defects in DNA repair genes in carcinogenesis
Chest X-ray showing lung cancer in the left lung
Three measures of global cancer mortality from 1990 to 2017
Engraving with two views of a Dutch woman who had a tumor removed from her neck in 1689
University of Florida Cancer Hospital
CancerTreeMammal
An invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast (pale area at the center) surrounded by spikes of whitish scar tissue and yellow fatty tissue
An invasive colorectal carcinoma (top center) in a colectomy specimen
A squamous-cell carcinoma (the whitish tumor) near the bronchi in a lung specimen
A large invasive ductal carcinoma in a mastectomy specimen

Tobacco use is the cause of about 22% of cancer deaths.

Evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against screening for skin cancer, oral cancer, lung cancer, or prostate cancer in men under 75.