Orange roughy

Hoplostethus atlanticusdeep sea perch
The orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus), also known as the red roughy, slimehead and deep sea perch, is a relatively large deep-sea fish belonging to the slimehead family (Trachichthyidae).wikipedia
117 Related Articles

Slimehead

TrachichthyidaeroughiesRoughy
The orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus), also known as the red roughy, slimehead and deep sea perch, is a relatively large deep-sea fish belonging to the slimehead family (Trachichthyidae).
The larger species – namely the orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) and Darwin's slimehead (Gephyroberyx darwinii) – are the target of extensive commercial fisheries off Australia and New Zealand.

Overfishing

overfishedover-fishingfishing pressure
Like other slimeheads, orange roughy is slow-growing and late to mature, resulting in a very low resilience which makes them extremely susceptible to overfishing.
The trawlers can target orange roughy, grenadiers, or sharks.

Seamount

seamountssea mountseamount chain
These aggregations form in and around geologic structures, such as undersea canyons and seamounts, where water movement and mixing is high, ensuring dense prey concentrations.
There are ongoing concerns on the negative impact of fishing on seamount ecosystems, and well-documented cases of stock decline, for example with the orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus).

Demersal fish

demersalbottom-dwellingbenthic
Orange roughy are generally sluggish and demersal; they form aggregations with a natural population density of up to 2.5 fish per m 2, now reduced to about 1.0 per m 2.
Commercial examples are the orange roughy and Patagonian toothfish.

Bottom trawling

bottom trawlotter trawlbeam trawl
Orange roughy is fished almost exclusively by bottom trawling.
Bottom trawling has been widely implicated in the population collapse of a variety of fish species, locally and worldwide, including orange roughy, barndoor skate, shark, and many others.

Pelagic fish

pelagicmesopelagic fishoceanic fish
Orange roughy are oceanodromous (wholly marine), pelagic spawners: that is, they migrate several hundred kilometers between localized spawning and feeding areas each year and form large spawning aggregations (possibly segregated according to gender) wherein the fish release large, spherical eggs 2.25 mm in diameter, made buoyant by an orange-red oil globule) and sperm en masse directly into the water.
Examples are the orange roughy and Patagonian toothfish.

Quota Management System

fishing quota
Fisheries in New Zealand are managed through the Quota Management System (QMS).

List of fish common names

List of common fish nameslistList of fishes
* List of fish common names

Deep sea fish

deep-sea fishdeep seadeep-sea
The orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus), also known as the red roughy, slimehead and deep sea perch, is a relatively large deep-sea fish belonging to the slimehead family (Trachichthyidae).

Family (biology)

familyfamiliessubfamily
The orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus), also known as the red roughy, slimehead and deep sea perch, is a relatively large deep-sea fish belonging to the slimehead family (Trachichthyidae).

Marine Conservation Society

MCSMarine Conservation Society South East
The UK Marine Conservation Society has categorized orange roughy as "vulnerable to exploitation".

Walvis Bay

WalvisbaaiWalfish BayWalvisbay
It is found in 3 to 9 C, deep (bathypelagic, 180 to 1800 m) waters of the Western Pacific Ocean, eastern Atlantic Ocean (from Iceland to Morocco; and from Walvis Bay, Namibia, to off Durban, South Africa), Indo-Pacific (off New Zealand and Australia), and in the eastern Pacific off Chile.

Durban

Durban, South AfricaPort NatalDurban, KwaZulu-Natal
It is found in 3 to 9 C, deep (bathypelagic, 180 to 1800 m) waters of the Western Pacific Ocean, eastern Atlantic Ocean (from Iceland to Morocco; and from Walvis Bay, Namibia, to off Durban, South Africa), Indo-Pacific (off New Zealand and Australia), and in the eastern Pacific off Chile.

Indo-Pacific

Indo-West PacificIndo-Pacific OceanIndopacific
It is found in 3 to 9 C, deep (bathypelagic, 180 to 1800 m) waters of the Western Pacific Ocean, eastern Atlantic Ocean (from Iceland to Morocco; and from Walvis Bay, Namibia, to off Durban, South Africa), Indo-Pacific (off New Zealand and Australia), and in the eastern Pacific off Chile.

Trawling

trawltrawlstrawl fishing
It is important to commercial deep-trawl fisheries.

Fishery

fisheriesfishingfishing ground
It is important to commercial deep-trawl fisheries.

Mucus

mucousmucinousslime
Its rounded head is riddled with muciferous canals (part of the lateral line system), as is typical of slimeheads.

Lateral line

lateral line systemneuromastpore
Its rounded head is riddled with muciferous canals (part of the lateral line system), as is typical of slimeheads.

Dorsal fin

dorsaldorsal finspterygiophore
The single dorsal fin contains four to six spines and 15 to 19 soft rays; the anal fin contains three spines and 10 to 12 soft rays.

Spine (zoology)

spinesspinespiny
The single dorsal fin contains four to six spines and 15 to 19 soft rays; the anal fin contains three spines and 10 to 12 soft rays.

Scute

scutesscutumconscutum
The 19 to 25 ventral scutes (modified scales) form a hard, bony median ridge between the pelvic fins and anus.

Scale (anatomy)

scalesscalescaly
The 19 to 25 ventral scutes (modified scales) form a hard, bony median ridge between the pelvic fins and anus.

Pelvic fin

pelvicpelvic finsfins
The 19 to 25 ventral scutes (modified scales) form a hard, bony median ridge between the pelvic fins and anus.

Anus

analperianalanal opening
The 19 to 25 ventral scutes (modified scales) form a hard, bony median ridge between the pelvic fins and anus.

Thorax

chestthoracicthoraces
The pectoral fins contain 15–18 soft rays each; the pelvic fins are thoracic and contain one spine and six soft rays; the caudal fin is forked.