Orbicularis oculi muscle

orbicularis oculiorbicularis musclemuscle of Riolanorbicularisorbicularis oculi, pars orbitalis
The orbicularis oculi is a muscle in the face that closes the eyelids.wikipedia
81 Related Articles

Blinking

blinkBlinksreflex blink
The pretarsal orbicularis is thought to be responsible for the spontaneous blink The palpebral portion acts involuntarily, closing the lids gently, as in sleep or in blinking; the orbital portion is subject to conscious control.
A single blink is determined by the forceful closing of the eyelid or inactivation of the levator palpebrae superioris and the activation of the palpebral portion of the orbicularis oculi, not the full open and close.

Lacrimal bone

lacrimallacrimalslacrimal bones
It arises from the posterior crest and adjacent part of the orbital surface of the lacrimal bone, and passing behind the lacrimal sac, divides into two slips, upper and lower, which are inserted into the superior and inferior tarsi medial to the puncta lacrimalia; occasionally it is very indistinct.
The crest, with a part of the orbital surface immediately behind it, gives origin to the lacrimal part of the orbicularis oculi and ends below in a small, hook-like projection, the lacrimal hamulus, which articulates with the lacrimal tubercle of the maxilla, and completes the upper orifice of the nasolacrimal canal; the hamulus sometimes exists as a separate piece, and is then called the lesser lacrimal bone.

Frontalis muscle

frontalisfrontal bellyfrontalis muscles
The orbital portion is thicker and of a reddish color; its fibers form a complete ellipse without interruption at the lateral palpebral commissure; the upper fibers of this portion blend with the frontalis and corrugator.
Its medial fibers are continuous with those of the procerus; its immediate fibers blend with the corrugator and orbicularis oculi muscles, thus attached to the skin of the eyebrows; and its lateral fibers are also blended with the latter muscle over the zygomatic process of the frontal bone.

Lacrimal sac

dacrocystographytear sacnasolacrimal sac
The lacrimal orbicularis facilitates the tear pump into the lacrimal sac.
Its superficial surface is covered by a fibrous expansion derived from the medial palpebral ligament, and its deep surface is crossed by the lacrimal part of the orbicularis oculi, which is attached to the crest on the lacrimal bone.

Medial palpebral ligament

medial
It arises from the nasal part of the frontal bone, from the frontal process of the maxilla in front of the lacrimal groove, and from the anterior surface and borders of a short fibrous band, the medial palpebral ligament. The palpebral portion of the muscle is thin and pale; it arises from the bifurcation of the medial palpebral ligament, forms a series of concentric curves, and is inserted into the lateral palpebral raphe at the outer canthus (corner) of eye.
* Orbicularis oculi muscle

Eyelid

eyelidspalpebralpalpebra
The orbicularis oculi is a muscle in the face that closes the eyelids.
The eyelid is made up of several layers; from superficial to deep, these are: skin, subcutaneous tissue, orbicularis oculi, orbital septum and tarsal plates, and palpebral conjunctiva.

Lateral palpebral raphe

lateral palpebral raphé
The palpebral portion of the muscle is thin and pale; it arises from the bifurcation of the medial palpebral ligament, forms a series of concentric curves, and is inserted into the lateral palpebral raphe at the outer canthus (corner) of eye.
Orbicularis oculi muscle

Corrugator supercilii muscle

corrugator superciliicorrugatorcorrugator muscle
The orbital portion is thicker and of a reddish color; its fibers form a complete ellipse without interruption at the lateral palpebral commissure; the upper fibers of this portion blend with the frontalis and corrugator.
It is located at the medial end of the eyebrow, beneath the frontalis and just above orbicularis oculi muscle.

Angular artery

angular
On the cheek it distributes branches which anastomose with the infraorbital; after supplying the lacrimal sac and orbicularis oculi, it ends by anastomosing with the dorsal nasal branch of the ophthalmic artery.

Zygomatic branches of the facial nerve

zygomatic branchzygomaticzygomatic branches
The zygomatic branches of the facial nerve (malar branches) run across the zygomatic bone to the lateral angle of the orbit, where they supply the orbicularis oculi, and join with filaments from the lacrimal nerve and the zygomaticofacial branch of the maxillary nerve.

Temporal branches of the facial nerve

Temporal branchTemporaltemporal branches
The more anterior branches supply the frontalis, the orbicularis oculi, and corrugator supercilii, and join the supraorbital and lacrimal branches of the ophthalmic.

Facial nerve

facialcranial nerve VIIVII
Associated pathology, such as a lesion of the facial nerve seen in Bell's palsy results in the inability to blink or close the ipsilateral eyelid.
This is due to the Facial Nerve's innervation of the muscles of facial expression, namely Orbicularis oculi, responsible for blinking.

Zygomatico-orbital artery

zygomatico-orbitalzygomatico-orbital branchzygomaticoörbital branch
This branch, which may arise directly from the superficial temporal artery, supplies the orbicularis oculi, and anastomoses with the lacrimal and palpebral branches of the ophthalmic artery.

Levator palpebrae superioris muscle

levator palpebrae superiorislevator palpebraelevator
The skin thus drawn upon is thrown into folds, especially radiating from the lateral angle of the eyelids; these folds become permanent in senescence, and form the so-called “crow's feet.” The Levator palpebræ superioris is the direct antagonist of this muscle; it raises the upper eyelid and exposes the front of the bulb of the eye.

Frontal bone

frontalfrontalsfrontal bones
It arises from the nasal part of the frontal bone, from the frontal process of the maxilla in front of the lacrimal groove, and from the anterior surface and borders of a short fibrous band, the medial palpebral ligament.

Maxilla

upper jawmaxillaemaxillary bone
It arises from the nasal part of the frontal bone, from the frontal process of the maxilla in front of the lacrimal groove, and from the anterior surface and borders of a short fibrous band, the medial palpebral ligament.

Lacrimal groove

lacrimal sulcuslacrimal
It arises from the nasal part of the frontal bone, from the frontal process of the maxilla in front of the lacrimal groove, and from the anterior surface and borders of a short fibrous band, the medial palpebral ligament.

Lacrimal punctum

punctapuncta lacrimalialacrimal puncta
It arises from the posterior crest and adjacent part of the orbital surface of the lacrimal bone, and passing behind the lacrimal sac, divides into two slips, upper and lower, which are inserted into the superior and inferior tarsi medial to the puncta lacrimalia; occasionally it is very indistinct.

Eye drop

eye dropseyedropsophthalmic
Loss of function for any reason results in an inability to close the eye, necessitating eye drops at the minimum to surgical closure of the eye in extreme cases.

Tarsorrhaphy

surgical closuretarsorraphy
Loss of function for any reason results in an inability to close the eye, necessitating eye drops at the minimum to surgical closure of the eye in extreme cases.

Sleep

sleepingsleep architectureasleep
The palpebral portion acts involuntarily, closing the lids gently, as in sleep or in blinking; the orbital portion is subject to conscious control.

Photophobia

photophobicsensitivity to lightlight sensitivity
When the entire muscle is brought into action, the skin of the forehead, temple, and cheek is drawn toward the medial angle of the orbit, and the eyelids are firmly closed, as in photophobia.

Senescence

senescentagingage
The skin thus drawn upon is thrown into folds, especially radiating from the lateral angle of the eyelids; these folds become permanent in senescence, and form the so-called “crow's feet.” The Levator palpebræ superioris is the direct antagonist of this muscle; it raises the upper eyelid and exposes the front of the bulb of the eye.

Wrinkle

wrinklescrow's feetwrinkling
The skin thus drawn upon is thrown into folds, especially radiating from the lateral angle of the eyelids; these folds become permanent in senescence, and form the so-called “crow's feet.” The Levator palpebræ superioris is the direct antagonist of this muscle; it raises the upper eyelid and exposes the front of the bulb of the eye.

Anatomical terms of muscle

antagonistagonistinsertion
The skin thus drawn upon is thrown into folds, especially radiating from the lateral angle of the eyelids; these folds become permanent in senescence, and form the so-called “crow's feet.” The Levator palpebræ superioris is the direct antagonist of this muscle; it raises the upper eyelid and exposes the front of the bulb of the eye.