Order (biology)

ordersuborderordersinfraordersuperordersubordersordinalbiological ordermagnordermirorder
In biological classification, the order (ordo) is * 1) a taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes.wikipedia
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Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
The Latin suffix -(i)formes meaning "having the form of" is used for the scientific name of orders of birds and fishes, but not for those of mammals and invertebrates.
The largest orders are the rodents, bats and Soricomorpha (shrews and others).

Bird

birdsAvesavian
The Latin suffix -(i)formes meaning "having the form of" is used for the scientific name of orders of birds and fishes, but not for those of mammals and invertebrates.
These two subdivisions are often given the rank of superorder, although Livezey and Zusi assigned them "cohort" rank.

Family (biology)

familyfamiliessubfamily
Family (familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major hierarchical taxonomic ranks in Linnaean taxonomy; it is classified between order and genus.

Class (biology)

classsubclassclasses
For plants, Linnaeus' orders in the Systema Naturae and the Species Plantarum were strictly artificial, introduced to subdivide the artificial classes into more comprehensible smaller groups.
Other well-known ranks in descending order of size are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, order, family, genus, and species, with class fitting between phylum and order.

Kingdom (biology)

kingdomkingdomssubkingdom
Carl Linnaeus was the first to apply it consistently to the division of all three kingdoms of nature (minerals, plants, and animals) in his Systema Naturae (1735, 1st.
When Carl Linnaeus introduced the rank-based system of nomenclature into biology in 1735, the highest rank was given the name "kingdom" and was followed by four other main or principal ranks: class, order, genus and species.

Boreoeutheria

Boreoeutherianboreoeutherian ancestorBoreotheria
Boreoeutheria (synonymous with Boreotheria) (from Greek Βορέας, "the greek god of north wind", εὐ-, "good, right" and θηρίον, "beast" hence "northern true beasts") is a clade (magnorder) of placental mammals which is composed of the sister taxa Laurasiatheria (most hoofed mammals, most pawed carnivores, and several other groups) and Euarchontoglires (Supraprimates).

Euarchontoglires

Supraprimates Supraprimates
Euarchontoglires (synonymous with Supraprimates) is a clade and a superorder of mammals, the living members of which belong to one of the five following groups: rodents, lagomorphs, treeshrews, colugos and primates.

Euarchonta

The Euarchonta are a proposed grandorder of mammals containing four orders: the Scandentia or treeshrews, the Dermoptera or colugos, the extinct Plesiadapiformes, and the Primates.

Primate

primatesnon-human primatesnon-human primate
A primate (from Latin primat-, from primus: "prime, first rank") is a eutherian mammal constituting the taxonomic order Primates.

Invertebrate

invertebratesmacroinvertebratemacroinvertebrates
The Latin suffix -(i)formes meaning "having the form of" is used for the scientific name of orders of birds and fishes, but not for those of mammals and invertebrates.
The distribution of spiracles can vary greatly among the many orders of insects, but in general each segment of the body can have only one pair of spiracles, each of which connects to an atrium and has a relatively large tracheal tube behind it.

Primatomorpha

Primatomophaprimatomorph
The Primatomorpha are a mirorder of mammals containing two extant orders: the Dermoptera or colugos and the Primates (Plesiadapiformes, Strepsirrhini, Haplorhini).

Procolophonomorpha

procolophonomorphHelpful list of parareptilia phylogenyprocolomorph
Procolophonomorpha is an order or clade containing most parareptiles.

Procolophonia

The Procolophonia are a suborder of herbivorous reptiles that lived from the Middle Permian till the end of the Triassic period.

Phylum

phyladivisionsuperphylum
Since the first publication of the APG system in 1998, which proposed a classification of angiosperms up to the level of orders, many sources have preferred to treat ranks higher than orders as informal clades.

Simian

Simiiformesanthropoidanthropoids
The simians or anthropoids are an infraorder (Simiiformes) of primates containing the parvorders Patyrrhini and Catarrhini, which consists of the superfamilies Cercopithecoidea and Hominoidea (including the genus Homo).

Genus

generageneric namegeneric
The order as a distinct rank of biological classification having its own distinctive name (and not just called a higher genus (genus summum)) was first introduced by the German botanist Augustus Quirinus Rivinus in his classification of plants that appeared in a series of treatises in the 1690s.
However, this does not typically ascend more than one or two levels: the order to which dogs and wolves belong is Carnivora ("Carnivores").

Lepidoptera

lepidopteranbutterflies and mothslepidopterans
Some of his ordinal names are still in use (e.g. Lepidoptera for the order of moths and butterflies, or Diptera for the order of flies, mosquitoes, midges, and gnats).
Lepidoptera (, from Ancient Greek lepís “scale” + pterón “wing”) is an order of insects that includes butterflies and moths (both are called lepidopterans).

Moth

mothsHeteroceraattracted to articifial lights
Some of his ordinal names are still in use (e.g. Lepidoptera for the order of moths and butterflies, or Diptera for the order of flies, mosquitoes, midges, and gnats).
Moths are a polyphyletic group of insects that includes all members of the order Lepidoptera that are not butterflies, with moths making up the vast majority of the order.

Butterfly

butterfliesRhopalocerabutterfly-like
Some of his ordinal names are still in use (e.g. Lepidoptera for the order of moths and butterflies, or Diptera for the order of flies, mosquitoes, midges, and gnats).
Butterflies are insects in the macrolepidopteran clade Rhopalocera from the order Lepidoptera, which also includes moths.

Fly

Dipterafliestrue flies
Some of his ordinal names are still in use (e.g. Lepidoptera for the order of moths and butterflies, or Diptera for the order of flies, mosquitoes, midges, and gnats).
True flies are insects of the order Diptera, the name being derived from the Greek δι- di- "two", and πτερόν pteron "wings".

Mosquito

Culicidaemosquitoesmosquitos
Some of his ordinal names are still in use (e.g. Lepidoptera for the order of moths and butterflies, or Diptera for the order of flies, mosquitoes, midges, and gnats).
Mosquitoes (alternate spelling mosquitos) are a group of about 3,500 species of small insects that are flies (order Diptera).

Systema Naturae

1758Systema Naturæ1789
For plants, Linnaeus' orders in the Systema Naturae and the Species Plantarum were strictly artificial, introduced to subdivide the artificial classes into more comprehensible smaller groups. Carl Linnaeus was the first to apply it consistently to the division of all three kingdoms of nature (minerals, plants, and animals) in his Systema Naturae (1735, 1st.
The classification was based on five levels: kingdom, class, order, genus, and species.

Taxonomic rank

superfamilysuperfamiliesrank
Examples of taxonomic ranks are species, genus, family, order, class, phylum, kingdom, domain, etc.

Taxonomy (biology)

taxonomictaxonomytaxonomist
What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all.
The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus, and species.

Carl Linnaeus

LinnaeusL.Carl von Linné
Carl Linnaeus was the first to apply it consistently to the division of all three kingdoms of nature (minerals, plants, and animals) in his Systema Naturae (1735, 1st.
Some elevated the distinction to the level of order.