Osman I

OsmanOsman GaziOsman BeyOthmanbelowempire's founderOsman GhaziOsman Ghazi IOsmangaziSultan Osman I
Osman I or Osman Gazi (Birinci Osman or Osman Gazi; died 1323/4), sometimes transliterated archaically as Othman, was the leader of the Ottoman Turks and the founder of the Ottoman dynasty.wikipedia
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Ottoman dynasty

OttomanSultanOttoman Sultan
Osman I or Osman Gazi (Birinci Osman or Osman Gazi; died 1323/4), sometimes transliterated archaically as Othman, was the leader of the Ottoman Turks and the founder of the Ottoman dynasty.
According to Ottoman tradition, the family originated from the Kayı tribe branch of the Oghuz Turks, under Osman I in northwestern Anatolia in the district of Bilecik Söğüt.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
He and the dynasty bearing his name later established and ruled the nascent Ottoman Empire (then known as the Ottoman Beylik or Emirate).
It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman I.

Ottoman Turks

OttomanTurksOttomans
Osman I or Osman Gazi (Birinci Osman or Osman Gazi; died 1323/4), sometimes transliterated archaically as Othman, was the leader of the Ottoman Turks and the founder of the Ottoman dynasty.
Reliable information about the early history of Ottoman Turks is scarce, but they take their Turkish name, Osmanlı ("Osman" being corrupted in some European languages as "Ottoman"), from the house of Osman I (reigned ca. 1299–1326), the founder of the dynasty that ruled the Ottoman Empire for its entire 624 years.

Anatolian beyliks

beylikbeyliksTurks
The Ottoman principality was just one of many Anatolian beyliks that emerged in the second half of the thirteenth century.
One of the beyliks, that of the Ottomans (Osmanoğulları "Sons of Osman"), expanded from its capital in Bursa and completed its conquest of the other beyliks by the late 15th century, evolving into the Ottoman Empire.

Turkey

🇹🇷TurkishTUR
Historians commonly mark the end date at the abolition of the sultanate in 1922, the proclamation of the Republic of Turkey in 1923, or the abolition of the caliphate in 1924.
In its wake, one of the Turkish principalities governed by Osman I would evolve over the next 200 years into the Ottoman Empire.

Ertuğrul

Ertuğrul GaziErtogrulErtugrul Ghazi
According to Ottoman tradition, Osman's father Ertuğrul led the Turkic Kayı tribe west from Central Asia into Anatolia, fleeing the Mongol onslaught.
Ertugrul (, Ertuğrul Gazi, Erṭoġrıl; often with the title Gazi) (died c. 1280 ) was the father of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire.

Battle of Bapheus

BapheusBapheus (Koyunhisar)Bapheus, Battle of
The first datable event in Osman's life is the Battle of Bapheus in 1301 or 1302, in which he defeated a Byzantine force sent to counter him.
The Battle of Bapheus occurred on 27 July 1302, between an Ottoman army under Osman I and a Byzantine army under George Mouzalon.

Abolition of the Ottoman sultanate

abolition of the sultanateSultanate was abolishedSultanate abolished
Historians commonly mark the end date at the abolition of the sultanate in 1922, the proclamation of the Republic of Turkey in 1923, or the abolition of the caliphate in 1924.
The Ottoman Empire's sovereignty was embodied in the dynasty of Osman I, who was its founder and namesake.

Söğüt

District of Söğüt
He then pledged allegiance to the Sultan of the Anatolian Seljuks, who granted him dominion over the town of Söğüt on the Byzantine frontier.
Legend has it that the bey (chief) of the tribe in the late 13th century, Ertuğrul, bravely kept the enemies at bay so that his son, Osman, could conquer them all during his reign, 1299 to 1326.

Anatolia

Asia MinorAsiaAnatolian
According to Ottoman tradition, Osman's father Ertuğrul led the Turkic Kayı tribe west from Central Asia into Anatolia, fleeing the Mongol onslaught.
The Osmanli ruler Osman I was the first Turkish ruler who minted coins in his own name in 1320s, for it bears the legend "Minted by Osman son of Ertugrul".

Malhun Hatun

Malhun
These early victories and exploits are favorite subjects of Ottoman writers, especially in love stories of his wooing and winning the fair Mal Hatun.
Malhun Hatun (died November 1323, other names Mal Hatun, Mala Hatun, Kameriye Sultana) was the first wife of Osman I, the leader of the Ottoman Turks and the founder of the dynasty that established and ruled the Ottoman Empire.

Siege of Bursa

Bursa (1326)Bursa, Siege ofcaptured the city of Bursa
Although Osman did not physically participate in the battle, the victory at Bursa proved to be extremely vital for the Ottomans as the city served as a staging ground against the Byzantines in Constantinople, and as a newly adorned capital for Osman's son, Orhan.
According to some sources Osman I died of natural causes just before the fall of the city, while others suggest that he lived long enough to hear about the victory on his death-bed and was buried in Bursa afterwards.

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineByzantinesEastern Roman Empire
He then pledged allegiance to the Sultan of the Anatolian Seljuks, who granted him dominion over the town of Söğüt on the Byzantine frontier. Situated in the region of Bithynia, Osman's principality was particularly well-placed to launch attacks on the vulnerable Byzantine Empire, which his descendants would eventually go on to conquer.
In time, one of the Beys, Osman I, created an empire that would eventually conquer Constantinople.

Rabia Bala Hatun

Rabia Bala
Rabia Bala Hatun, daughter of Sheikh Edebali Alaeddin Pasha — died in 1332, son of Rabia Bala Hatun
Râbi'a Bâlâ Hâtun (died January 1324 birth name Rabia) was the wife of Ottoman Sultan Osman I.

List of sultans of the Ottoman Empire

SultanOttoman SultanSultans
The Sword of Osman (Taklid-i Seyf) was an important sword of state used during the coronation ceremony of the Ottoman Sultans.
The empire came into existence at the end of the thirteenth century, and its first ruler (and the namesake of the Empire) was Osman I.

Alaeddin Pasha

Alaeddin
Alaeddin Pasha — died in 1332, son of Rabia Bala Hatun
Alaeddin Bey, or Alaeddin Pasha (Alâeddin Paşa; Söğüt, 1280/1282 – Bursa, 1331), was the half-brother of Orhan I, who succeeded their father, Osman I Ghazi, in the leadership of the Ottoman Empire.

Ghazi (warrior)

GhazighazisGazi
Today it is used by Turks for soldiers, who are hurt during battle, but also used as a title for Turkic champions such as Ertuğrul, Osman Gazi, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Köse Mihal

Gazi MihalMichael of the Peaked Beard
Köse Mihal
undefined 1340) accompanied Osman I in his ascent to power as an Emir and founder of the Ottoman Empire.

Kayı tribe

KayıKaiKayıhan tribe
According to Ottoman tradition, Osman's father Ertuğrul led the Turkic Kayı tribe west from Central Asia into Anatolia, fleeing the Mongol onslaught. According to later Ottoman tradition, Osman's ancestors were descendants of the Kayı tribe of Oghuz Turks.
According to Ottoman tradition, Osman I, founder of Ottoman Empire, was descended from the Kayı tribe.

Orhan

Orhan GaziOrhan Beybelow
Although Osman did not physically participate in the battle, the victory at Bursa proved to be extremely vital for the Ottomans as the city served as a staging ground against the Byzantines in Constantinople, and as a newly adorned capital for Osman's son, Orhan.
He was born in Söğüt, as the son of Osman Gazi and Malhun Hatun.

Osmanoğlu family

OsmanoğluOttoman (Osmanoğlu) familydescendants of an Ottoman sovereign
Osmanoğlu family
There were 36 Ottoman Sultans who ruled over the Empire, and each one was a direct descendant through the male line of the first Ottoman Sultan, Sultan Osman I.

Sheikh Edebali

EdebaliSheik Edebali
Rabia Bala Hatun, daughter of Sheikh Edebali
Edebali often conversed with his close friend Ertugrul Ghazi, the father of Osman Ghazi, about Islam and the state of affairs of Muslims in Anatolia.

Tughra

monogramTuğra-Sultan's Signature
Depending on the period, this name can be as simple as Orhan, son of Osman in the first tughra in 1326.

Islam

MuslimMuslimsIslamic
Accordingly, he interpretated a dream of Osman Gazi as God's legitimation of his reign.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarFirst
It existed until shortly after the end of World War I.