A report on Ostrava

Self-governing districts of Ostrava
Cadastral areas of Ostrava
City logo
The Church of St. Wenceslaus, one of the oldest and most important monuments of Ostrava
Marian Column (1702) at Masaryk Square
The Sophienhütte ironworks, c. 1910
Miloš Sýkora Bridge over the Ostravice River and Silesian Ostrava Town Hall
Leoš Janáček Airport Ostrava
Ostrava trams in their traditional blue and white livery at the "Nová Ves vodárna" stop
Railway station Ostrava-Svinov
The Ostravice River
Inside the Antonín Dvořák Theatre
Colours of Ostrava
Ostrava Puppet Theatre
Jirásek Square, former chicken market (kuří rynek), in Moravská Ostrava
Heyrovský Secondary Industrial School and High School
VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava
VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava – Ceremonial Hall
Vítkovice stadium

City in the north-east of the Czech Republic, and the capital of the Moravian-Silesian Region.

- Ostrava

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D1 motorway (Czech Republic)

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Main highway of the Czech Republic.

Main highway of the Czech Republic.

Map of D1 motorway
Aerial photo of D1 near Ostředek
D1 somewhere in Vysočina Region
Vysočina highway bridge on km 144, 60 km from Brno
motorway D1 in Prague
D1 near Brno
Motorway D1 in Prague-Chodov

Currently it connects the two biggest Czech cities, Prague and Brno; in the future it will be extended to Ostrava and to the Czech–Polish border in Věřňovice (Karviná District) / Gorzyczki (Wodzisław County).

Gate of No Return, a memorial at Praha–Bubny railway station commemorating the deportation of tens of thousands Jews via the station

The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia

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The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia, a portion of the Czech lands annexed into Germany, resulted in the deportation, dispossession, and death of 80,000 Jews, most of the pre-World War II population, between 1939 and 1945.

The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia, a portion of the Czech lands annexed into Germany, resulted in the deportation, dispossession, and death of 80,000 Jews, most of the pre-World War II population, between 1939 and 1945.

Gate of No Return, a memorial at Praha–Bubny railway station commemorating the deportation of tens of thousands Jews via the station
Jewish Quarter of Třebíč, Moravia, recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site
German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1938 and 1939
German troops greeted by civilians making Nazi salutes in Freedom Square (Brno), Brno, 16 March 1939
Interior of the Olomouc Synagogue, burned in March 1939
A passport used by a Jew to escape Prague on the last train before the German invasion
Stolperstein for Zikmund Slatner, deported from Moravská Ostrava to Nisko.
Furniture confiscated from deported Jews in a synagogue, 1944
Forced labor of roadbuilding, 1943
Jews wearing yellow badges in Prague, c. 1942
Mladá Boleslav castle (center) where 250 Jews were imprisoned in 1940
Jews eating at a community soup kitchen, 1943 or earlier
In the Łódź Ghetto, Jews from Austria, Germany, and Prague are rounded up for deportation to Kulmhof extermination camp, May 1942.
Theresienstadt Ghetto population by country of origin. The original population was 3,500 soldiers and 3,700 civilians.
Jewish women sorting confiscated textiles, 1943
Karl Hermann Frank (left) on trial in Prague, 1946
List of victims on the wall of Pinkas Synagogue in Prague, Brumel–Fink

At this time, most Jews lived in large cities such as Prague (35,403 Jews, who made up 4.2 percent of the population), Brno (11,103, 4.2 percent), and Moravská Ostrava (6,865, 5.5 percent).

Antonín Dvořák Theatre

National Moravian-Silesian Theatre

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Antonín Dvořák Theatre
Jiří Myron Theatre

The National Moravian-Silesian Theatre (Národní divadlo moravskoslezské; NDM) is a professional theatre company based in Ostrava in the Czech Republic.

Hukvaldy

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Municipality and village in Frýdek-Místek District in the Moravian-Silesian Region of the Czech Republic.

Municipality and village in Frýdek-Místek District in the Moravian-Silesian Region of the Czech Republic.

Monument of Bystrouška
A bridge in Hukvaldy Castle
Former archbishops palace
Church of Saint Maximilian

Since 2018, it has been a part of the Leoš Janáček International Music Festival in Ostrava.

Demonstration of 25 November 1989 in Prague.

Velvet Revolution

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Non-violent transition of power in what was then Czechoslovakia, occurring from 17 November to 28 November 1989.

Non-violent transition of power in what was then Czechoslovakia, occurring from 17 November to 28 November 1989.

Demonstration of 25 November 1989 in Prague.
Memorial of the student demonstrations of 17 November, in Prague
Memorial of the Velvet revolution in Bratislava (Námestie SNP), Slovakia:
Only those who struggle for their freedom are worthy of it.'
At this place in November 1989 we decided to take our responsibility for the future into our own hands. We decided to put an end to communism and to establish freedom and democracy."
St. Wenceslas Monument
People on the Wenceslas Square in Prague
A statue of Saint Adalbert of Prague with a streamer and banners
25 November, people flow from the Prague cathedral (where ended a mass in honour of canonisation of Agnes of Bohemia) and from the metro station Hradčanská to Letná Plain.
"To the general secretary – a general strike!!!" An appeal with portrait of Miloš Jakeš, who resigned on 24 November
21st anniversary of the Velvet Revolution – former President Václav Havel (right, with flowers) at the Memorial at Národní Street in Prague
Václav Havel honouring the deaths of those who took part in the Prague protest.
Non-violent protesters with flowers face armed policemen

Theatres in Bratislava, Brno, Ostrava and other towns went on strike.

Ostrava main railway station

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Ostrava main railway station, (Ostrava hlavní nádraží, abbreviated Ostrava hl.n), is a railway station in city part Ostrava-Přívoz and main train terminus of Ostrava, third biggest city in the Czech Republic.

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Silesian Ostrava Castle

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Silesian Ostrava Castle is a castle in Ostrava, in the northeastern Czech Republic.

Ostrava Days

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Ostrava Days is a three-week-long exposition of contemporary classical music that takes place biennially in the city of Ostrava, The Czech Republic.

HC Vítkovice Ridera

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HC Vítkovice Ridera is an ice hockey club based in Vítkovice (The Moravian-part of Ostrava) in the Czech Republic, competing in the Czech Extraliga.

Austria-Hungary

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Constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918.

Constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918.

Silver coin: 5 corona, 1908 - The bust of Franz Joseph I facing right surrounded by the legend "Franciscus Iosephus I, Dei gratia, imperator Austriae, rex Bohemiae, Galiciae, Illyriae et cetera et apostolicus rex Hungariae"
Emperor Franz Joseph I in 1905
Electoral districts of Austria and Hungary in the 1880s. On the map opposition districts are marked in different shades of red, ruling party districts are in different shades of green, independent districts are in white.
Austrian Parliament building
Hungarian Parliament building
Emperor Franz Joseph I visiting Prague and opening the new Emperor Francis I Bridge in 1901
Kraków, a historical Polish city in the Austro-Hungarian Empire where in 1870 authorities allowed the use of the Polish language in the Jagiellonian University
Coronation of Francis Joseph I and Elisabeth Amalie at Matthias Church, Buda, 8 June 1867
Map of the counties of the Lands of the Crown of St. Stephen (Hungary proper and Croatia-Slavonia)
Circuits (Kreise) of Bosnia and Herzegovina: Banja Luka, Bihać, Mostar, Sarajevo, Travnik, Tuzla
Demonstration for universal right to vote in Prague, Bohemia, 1905
Bosnian Muslim resistance during the battle of Sarajevo in 1878 against the Austro-Hungarian occupation
Recruits from Bosnia-Herzegovina, including Muslim Bosniaks (31%), were drafted into special units of the Austro-Hungarian Army as early as 1879 and were commended for their bravery in service of the Austrian emperor, being awarded more medals than any other unit. The jaunty military march Die Bosniaken Kommen was composed in their honor by Eduard Wagnes.
Traditional clothing in Hungary, late 19th century
Traditional costumes of Tyrol
Parade in Prague, Kingdom of Bohemia, 1900
Romantic style Great Synagogue in Pécs, built by Neolog community in 1869
Religions in Austria–Hungary, from the 1881 edition of Andrees Allgemeiner Handatlas. Catholics (both Roman and Uniate) are blue, Protestants purple, Eastern Orthodox yellow, and Muslims green.
Funeral in Galicia by Teodor Axentowicz, 1882
Ethno-linguistic map of Austria–Hungary, 1910
Meyers Konversations-Lexikon ethnographic map of Austria–Hungary, 1885
Literacy in Austria–Hungary (census 1880)
Literacy in Hungary by counties in 1910 (excluding Croatia)
Physical map of Austria–Hungary in 1914
Orthodox Jews from Galicia in Leopoldstadt, Vienna, 1915
A 20-crown banknote of the Dual Monarchy, using all official and recognized languages (the reverse side was Hungarian)
Black Friday, 9 May 1873, Vienna Stock Exchange. The Panic of 1873 and Long Depression followed.
A stentor reading the day's news in the Telefonhírmondó of Budapest
Detailed railway map of Austrian and Hungarian railways from 1911
The start of construction of the underground in Budapest (1894–1896)
The SS Kaiser Franz Joseph I (12,567 t) of the Austro-Americana company was the largest passenger ship ever built in Austria. Because of its control over the coast of much of the Balkans, Austria–Hungary had access to several seaports.
Dubrovnik, Kingdom of Dalmatia
This picture of the arrest of a suspect in Sarajevo is usually associated with the capture of Gavrilo Princip, although some believe it depicts Ferdinand Behr, a bystander.
Crowds on the streets in the aftermath of the Anti-Serb riots in Sarajevo, 29 June 1914
MÁVAG armoured train in 1914
Franz Josef I and Wilhelm II
with military commanders during World War I
Siege of Przemyśl in 1915
Italian troops in Trento on 3 November 1918, after the Battle of Vittorio Veneto. Italy's victory marked the end of the war on the Italian Front and secured the dissolution of Austria–Hungary.
War memorial in Păuleni-Ciuc, Romania
The revolt of ethnic Czech units in Austria in May 1918 was brutally suppressed. It was considered a mutiny by the code of military justice.
The Treaty of Trianon: Kingdom of Hungary lost 72% of its land and 3.3 million people of Hungarian ethnicity.
Czechoslovak declaration of independence rally in Prague on Wenceslas Square, 28 October 1918

Bohemia: Prague (1891); Teplice (1895); Liberec (1897); Ústí nad Labem, Plzeň, Olomouc (1899); Moravia, Brno, Jablonec nad Nisou (1900); Ostrava (1901); Mariánské Lázně (1902); Budějovice, České Budějovice, Jihlava (1909)