Otaku

wotaotakusotaku cultureanime and manga fandomanime fan communityanime fandomanime otakufansgeek/obsessive hobbyistgeeks
Otaku is a Japanese term for people with obsessive interests, particularly in anime and manga.wikipedia
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Tsutomu Miyazaki

manSaitama serial kidnapping murders of young girls
Otaku may be used as a pejorative; its negativity stems from a stereotypical view of otaku and the media's reporting on Tsutomu Miyazaki, "The Otaku Murderer", in 1989.
Tsutomu Miyazaki, also known as The Otaku Murderer or The Little Girl Murderer, was a Japanese serial killer, cannibal, child rapist and necrophile who abducted and murdered four young girls in Saitama and Tokyo Prefectures from August 1988 to June 1989.

Anime and manga fandom

anime fandomanime and mangafan
Otaku is a Japanese term for people with obsessive interests, particularly in anime and manga.
Poitras, Lewis and Sterling describe current generation of fans as the "Otaku Generation", however not necessarily applying the word "otaku" to current fans.

Akio Nakamori

Nakamori Akio
Its contemporary use originated with Akio Nakamori's 1983 essay in Manga Burikko.
He is credited as popularizing the term "otaku" in its modern colloquial usage.

Otaku USA

The American magazine Otaku USA popularizes and covers these aspects.
Otaku USA is a bimonthly magazine published by Sovereign Media, which covers various elements of the "otaku" lifestyle (such as anime, manga, video games, cosplay and Japanese popular music) from an American perspective.

Manga Burikko

Its contemporary use originated with Akio Nakamori's 1983 essay in Manga Burikko. His 1983 series Research for "Otaku", printed in the lolicon magazine Manga Burikko, applied the term to unpleasant fans in caricature.
The manga in the magazine were generally bishōjo and lolita manga which were mostly science fiction, parody, shōjo manga-style, anime-related, idol star related, and anything otaku related.

Otaku no Video

The term's usage spread throughout rec.arts.anime with discussions about Otaku no Videos portrayal of otaku before its 1994 English release.
Otaku no Video is a 1991 anime spoofing the life and culture of otaku, individuals with obsessive interests in media, particularly anime and manga, as well as the history of Gainax, its creators.

Japanese idol

idolidolsidol group
These publications classify distinct groups including anime, manga, camera, automobile, idol and electronics otaku.
Male fans of idols who regularly participate in organized fan chants with accompanied movements are colloquially referred to as "wota", derived from the word "otaku."

Lolicon

lolita complexLolilikes little girls
His 1983 series Research for "Otaku", printed in the lolicon magazine Manga Burikko, applied the term to unpleasant fans in caricature.
The meaning of lolicon has evolved much in the Western world, as have words like anime, otaku and hentai.

Figure moe zoku

Figure ''moe zoku
Japanese journalist Akihiro Ōtani suspected that Kobayashi's crime was committed by a member of the figure moe zoku even before his arrest.
Figure moe zoku is a Japanese term which refers to "otaku who collect figurines".

Mobile Suit Gundam

One Year WarZeonMobile Suit Gundam: The Movie Trilogy
The subculture's birth coincided with the anime boom, after the release of works such as Mobile Suit Gundam before it branched into Comic Market.
Despite being released in 1979, the original Gundam series is still remembered and recognized within the anime fan community.

Kaoru Kobayashi (murderer)

Kaoru KobayashiAriyama Kaede
The identification of otaku turned negative in late 2004 when Kaoru Kobayashi kidnapped, sexually assaulted, and murdered a seven-year-old first-grade student.
Ariyama's murder caused a surge in the moral panic against otaku culture in Japan.

Takashi Murakami

2013 Murikami Shanghai Exhibition6HP / Six Hearts PrincessMurakami Takashi
In his book, Otaku, Hiroki Azuma observed: "Between 2001 and 2007, the otaku forms and markets quite rapidly won social recognition in Japan", citing the fact that "[i]n 2003, Hayao Miyazaki won the Academy Award for his Spirited Away; around the same time Takashi Murakami achieved recognition for otaku-like designs; in 2004, the Japanese pavilion in the 2004 International Architecture exhibition of the Venice Biennale (Biennale Architecture) featured “otaku”. In 2005, the word moe - one of the keywords of the present volume - was chosen as one of the top ten “buzzwords of the year."
In order to create something rooted in his own Japanese culture and history but still fresh and valid internationally, he began searching for something that could be considered 'uniquely Japanese.' After concluding that elements of 'high' art were confounding at best, he began to focus on Japan's 'low' culture, especially anime and manga, and the larger subculture of otaku.

Reki-jo

Reki-jo are female otaku who are interested in Japanese history.
Reki-jo are a kind of otaku, people obsessed with a particular interest.

Idoru

eponymous novel
The term was also popularized by William Gibson's 1996 novel Idoru, which references otaku.
Disbelieving, Chia decides to investigate on her own and seeks the help of her host Mitsuko’s brother Masahiko, an Otaku who is a member of the hacker community the "Walled City" (a virtual community based on the Kowloon Walled City).

Geek

geek culturegeeksgeek chic
In modern Japanese slang, the term otaku is mostly equivalent to "geek" or "nerd" (both broad sense; common sense of geek would be "tech otaku" and common sense of nerd would be "intellectual otaku" or "gariben", but in a more derogatory manner than used in the West.

Genshiken

Genshiken NidaimeGenshiken 2Genshiken: Second Generation
Other works depict otaku subculture less critically, such as Genshiken and Comic Party.
Genshiken is a manga series by Shimoku Kio about a college club for otaku (extremely obsessed fans of various media) and the lifestyle its members pursue.

Maid café

maid cafemaidmaid cafés
The district of Akihabara in Tokyo, where there are maid cafés featuring waitresses who dress up and act like maids or anime characters, is a notable attraction center for otaku.
Maid cafés were originally designed primarily to cater to the fantasies of male otaku, fans of anime, manga, and video games.

Akiba-kei

Akiba-chanAkibakei
Some terms refer to a location, such as Akiba-kei, a slang term meaning "Akihabara-style" which applies to those familiar with Akihabara's culture.
Akihabara is a district in Chiyoda, Tokyo where many otaku, or obsessive anime, manga, and video game fans gather.

Bishōjo game

bishōjobishōjo'' gamesbishoujo game
Other terms, such as Itasha, literally "painful car", describe vehicles who are decorated with fictional characters, especially bishōjo game or eroge characters.
In 1989 serial killer Tsutomu Miyazaki was arrested and was revealed to be a consumer of lolicon manga, causing widespread opposition to pornographic manga, otaku and anything similar.

Motoko Arai

Arai Motoko
Another claim for the origin of the term comes from the works of science fiction author Motoko Arai, who used the word in her novels as a second-person pronoun and the readers adopted the term for themselves.
Arai is often credited with the popularization of the term otaku in Japanese popular culture through her use of it in her novels.

Anime

animatedJapanese animationJapanese animated
It is typically used to refer to a fan of anime/manga but can also refer to Japanese video games or Japanese culture in general.
Japanese culture and words have entered English usage through the popularity of the medium, including otaku, an unflattering Japanese term commonly used in English to denote a fan of anime and manga.

Akihiro Ōtani

Otani Akihiro
Japanese journalist Akihiro Ōtani suspected that Kobayashi's crime was committed by a member of the figure moe zoku even before his arrest.
Akihiro Ōtani, a Japanese journalist, known for his political crusade in the Japanese mass media against otaku and his stake in the junior idol industry.

Hiroki Azuma

Azuma Hiroki
In his book, Otaku, Hiroki Azuma observed: "Between 2001 and 2007, the otaku forms and markets quite rapidly won social recognition in Japan", citing the fact that "[i]n 2003, Hayao Miyazaki won the Academy Award for his Spirited Away; around the same time Takashi Murakami achieved recognition for otaku-like designs; in 2004, the Japanese pavilion in the 2004 International Architecture exhibition of the Venice Biennale (Biennale Architecture) featured “otaku”. In 2005, the word moe - one of the keywords of the present volume - was chosen as one of the top ten “buzzwords of the year."
In the late 1990s, Azuma began examining various pop phenomena, especially the emerging otaku/Internet/video game culture, and became widely known as an advocate of the thoughts of a new generation of Japanese.

Moe (slang)

moeAnime Saimoe Tournamentmoé
The last is the "fan magazine-obsessed otaku", which is predominately female with a small group of males being the "moe type"; the secret hobby is focused on the production or interest in fan works.
Moe is Japanese that refers to feelings of strong affection mainly towards characters (usually female) in anime, manga, video games, and other media directed at the otaku market.

Nerd

nerdynerd culturecomputer nerd
In modern Japanese slang, the term otaku is mostly equivalent to "geek" or "nerd" (both broad sense; common sense of geek would be "tech otaku" and common sense of nerd would be "intellectual otaku" or "gariben", but in a more derogatory manner than used in the West.