Oval Office

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West Wing

In Celebration of the Centennial of the West Wing of the White House, 2002
The Oval Office is, since 1909, the working office space of the president of the United States, located in the West Wing of the White House, Washington, D.C. It has four doors: the east door opens to the Rose Garden; the west door leads to a private study and dining room; the northwest door opens onto the main corridor of the West Wing; and the northeast door opens to the office of the president's secretary.
The West Wing contains the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, the Situation Room, and the Roosevelt Room.

White House Rose Garden

Rose GardenWhite HouseRose Garden of the White House
It has four doors: the east door opens to the Rose Garden; the west door leads to a private study and dining room; the northwest door opens onto the main corridor of the West Wing; and the northeast door opens to the office of the president's secretary.
The White House Rose Garden is a garden bordering the Oval Office and the West Wing of the White House in Washington, D.C., United States.

White House

The White HouseExecutive MansionPresident's House
The Oval Office is, since 1909, the working office space of the president of the United States, located in the West Wing of the White House, Washington, D.C.
Eight years later in 1909, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office, which was eventually moved as the section was expanded.

Oval Office address

addressed the nation from the Oval Officepresidential addressesPresidential Addresses to the Nation
Several presidents have addressed the nation from the Oval Office on occasion.
An Oval Office address is a speech made from the White House by the President of the United States, so named because it is traditionally made from the Oval Office.

Richard Nixon's resignation speech

resignation speechNixon's resignationaddressing the nation on television the previous evening
Examples include Kennedy presenting news of the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), Nixon [[SP 3-125: Richard Nixon's address announcing his intention to resign the presidency|announcing his resignation from office]] (1974), Ronald Reagan following the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster (1986), and George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks (2001).
It was delivered in the Oval Office.

Nathan C. Wyeth

Nathan C WyethNathan Corwith WyethNathan Wyeth
Designed by Nathan C. Wyeth and completed in 1909, the office was centered on the south side of the building, much as the oval rooms in the White House are.
He is best known for designing the West Wing of the White House, creating the first Oval Office.

Eric Gugler

Gugler
Dissatisfied with the size and layout of the West Wing, President Franklin D. Roosevelt engaged New York architect Eric Gugler to redesign it in 1933.
He was selected by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to design the Oval Office.

Space Shuttle Challenger disaster

Space Shuttle ''Challenger'' disasterChallenger'' disasterChallenger disaster
Examples include Kennedy presenting news of the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), Nixon [[SP 3-125: Richard Nixon's address announcing his intention to resign the presidency|announcing his resignation from office]] (1974), Ronald Reagan following the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster (1986), and George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks (2001).
After a discussion with his aides, Reagan postponed the State of the Union, and instead addressed the nation about the disaster from the Oval Office of the White House.

Cabinet Room (White House)

Cabinet Rooma room adjacent to the Oval OfficeWhite House Cabinet Room
His workspace was a two-room suite of Executive Office and Cabinet Room, located just west of the present Cabinet Room.
The Cabinet Room is located in the West Wing of the White House, adjoining the Oval Office, and looks out upon the White House Rose Garden.

List of Oval Office desks

Oval Office deskSix desksall the Oval Office desk
Six desks have been used in the Oval Office by U.S. presidents.
United States presidents have used six different desks in the Oval Office, their executive office.

Theodore Roosevelt desk

president's desk
The furniture, including the president's desk, was designed by architect Charles Follen McKim and executed by A. H. Davenport and Company, of Boston.
Made in 1903, it is one of only six desks to have been used by U.S. presidents in the Oval Office.

Seal of the President of the United States

presidential sealsealSeal of the President
He and Gugler devised a room architecturally grander than the previous two rooms, with more robust Georgian details: doors topped with substantial pediments, bookcases set into niches, a deep bracketed cornice, and a ceiling medallion of the Presidential Seal.
The plaster seal in the Oval Office ceiling (originally installed in 1934 and at some point changed so the eagle faces to its right) is also based on this design, and a version is in the floor next to Wilson's tomb in the Washington National Cathedral.

HMS Resolute (1850)

HMS ''ResoluteResoluteHMS ''Resolute'' (1850)
Equally popular is the Resolute Desk, so named because it was made from the timbers of the British frigate HMS Resolute.
Timbers from the ship were later used to construct the Resolute desk which was presented to the President of the United States and is currently located in the White House Oval Office.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
Examples include Kennedy presenting news of the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), Nixon [[SP 3-125: Richard Nixon's address announcing his intention to resign the presidency|announcing his resignation from office]] (1974), Ronald Reagan following the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster (1986), and George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks (2001).
That evening, he addressed the nation from the Oval Office, promising a strong response to the attacks.

President's House (Philadelphia)

President's HousePresident's House in Philadelphiaexecutive mansion
In 1790, Washington built a large, two-story, semi-circular addition to the rear of the President's House in Philadelphia, creating a ceremonial space in which the public would meet the president.
The Park undertook a public archaeology project in 2007 that uncovered foundations of the backbuildings, the President's office, and the massive Bow Window designed by Washington as a ceremonial space.

Donald Trump

TrumpPresident TrumpPresident Donald Trump
President Donald Trump meets with (from left) U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price; Vice President Mike Pence; Speaker of the House Paul Ryan; Zeke Emanuel; and Director of the Domestic Policy Council Andrew Bremberg, Monday, March 20, 2017, in the Oval Office.]]
In a January 2018 Oval Office meeting to discuss immigration legislation, he reportedly referred to El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, and African nations as "shithole countries".

Rembrandt Peale

RembrandtPealeRubens Peale
Most presidents have hung a portrait of George Washington – usually the Rembrandt Peale "Porthole" portrait or the Charles Willson Peale three-quarter-length portrait – over the mantel at the north end of the room.
Peale went on to create over 70 detailed replicas, including one of Washington in full military uniform that currently hangs in the Oval Office.

Ronald Reagan

ReaganRonald W. ReaganPresident Reagan
Examples include Kennedy presenting news of the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), Nixon [[SP 3-125: Richard Nixon's address announcing his intention to resign the presidency|announcing his resignation from office]] (1974), Ronald Reagan following the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster (1986), and George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks (2001).
The president addressed the nation from the Oval Office after the attacks had commenced, stating, "When our citizens are attacked or abused anywhere in the world on the direct orders of hostile regimes, we will respond so long as I'm in this office."

Cuban Missile Crisis

Cuban Quarantinemissile crisisCuban crisis
Examples include Kennedy presenting news of the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), Nixon [[SP 3-125: Richard Nixon's address announcing his intention to resign the presidency|announcing his resignation from office]] (1974), Ronald Reagan following the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster (1986), and George W. Bush in the wake of the September 11 attacks (2001).
After the EXCOMM meeting, a smaller meeting continued in the Oval Office.

Bust of Winston Churchill (Epstein)

bust of Winston Churchill
Following the September 11, 2001 attacks, British Prime Minister Tony Blair lent him a bust of Winston Churchill, who had guided Great Britain through World War II.
Two casts have been displayed in the Oval Office.

Oval Office Study

private study
It has four doors: the east door opens to the Rose Garden; the west door leads to a private study and dining room; the northwest door opens onto the main corridor of the West Wing; and the northeast door opens to the office of the president's secretary.
Located in the West Wing of the White House, it adjoins the Oval Office, the ceremonial office of the president.

A. H. Davenport and Company

A. H. Davenport CompanyA.H. DavenportIrving & Casson-A.H. Davenport
The furniture, including the president's desk, was designed by architect Charles Follen McKim and executed by A. H. Davenport and Company, of Boston.
President William Howard Taft moved the desk, sofas and chairs into the first Oval Office, which was completed in 1909.

Fired On

Harry S. Truman displayed Remington's oil painting Fired On.
The painting was displayed in the Oval Office during the presidency of Harry S. Truman.

Resolute desk

Resolute'' desk
Equally popular is the Resolute Desk, so named because it was made from the timbers of the British frigate HMS Resolute.
The Resolute desk is a nineteenth-century partners' desk used by several presidents of the United States in the White House Oval Office as the Oval Office desk.

Working on the Statue of Liberty

The Avenue in the Rain by Childe Hassam and Working on the Statue of Liberty by Norman Rockwell flanked the Resolute Desk in Bill Clinton's office, and did the same in Barack Obama's.
It was displayed in the Oval Office during the administrations of Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama, sometimes to the left of the President's desk, above a cabinet or table on which was displayed Frederic Remington's sculpture The Bronco Buster.