Oval Office

President Joe Biden on the night of his inauguration, Wednesday, January 20, 2021
President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris in the Oval Office, April 12, 2021
President's House, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. George Washington's bow window (not depicted) is echoed in the shape of the Oval Office.
Theodore Roosevelt Executive Office and Cabinet Room, c. undefined1904
Taft Oval Office, completed 1909. Nearly identical in size to the modern office, it was damaged by fire in 1929 and demolished in 1933.
Location of the Oval Office in the West Wing.
Franklin D. Roosevelt in the newly completed Modern Oval Office, December 31, 1934.
Plaster ceiling medallion installed in 1934 includes elements of the Seal of the President of the United States.
Caroline Kennedy and Kerry Kennedy beneath the Resolute desk in 1963. Note the Truman carpet.
President Truman receiving a marble bust of Simon Bolivar from a Venezuelan delegation, December 27, 1946
President Barack Obama with Oval Office artwork, September 28, 2012
The Oval Office floor has been replaced several times, most recently during the administration of George W. Bush. The 2005 installation, based on the original 1933 design by Eric Gugler, features a contrasting cross pattern of quarter sawn oak and walnut.
Location of the Yellow Oval Room on the second floor of the White House. A number of presidents used this as their private office or library.
The Yellow Oval Room about 1868 used as President Andrew Johnson's private office.
The Yellow Oval Room as President Grover Cleveland's private office, 1886. Note the Resolute desk before the 3 windows.
The Yellow Oval Room as President Franklin D. Roosevelt's private office, 1933.
Exterior of the West Wing (circa 1910s), showing the curve of the Taft Oval Office.
President Hoover views West Wing fire ruins, January 15, 1930.
West Wing expansion, 1934.
Exterior of the Oval Office from the South Lawn, July 15, 2006.
George Washington (1776) by Charles Willson Peale
George Washington ({{circa}}1823) by Rembrandt Peale
City of Washington from Beyond the Navy Yard (1833) by George Cooke
Eastport and Passamaquoddy Bay ({{circa}}1840) by Victor De Grailly
Andrew Jackson (1845) by Thomas Sully
Waiting for the Hour (1863) by William Tolman Carlton
Passing the Outpost (1881) by Alfred Wordsworth Thompson
The Broncho Buster (1895) by Frederic Remington
Abraham Lincoln ({{circa}}1915) by George Story
The Avenue in the Rain (1917) by Childe Hassam
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1947) by Frank O. Salisbury
Earthrise (1968) by William Anders
John F. Kennedy's children visit the Oval Office
The Oval Office during the presidency of Gerald Ford
President Richard M. Nixon and Bob Hope play golf in the Oval Office, a tradition harking back to the tenure of Lyndon B. Johnson
President George W. Bush chose a more muted color palette than his predecessor, using shades of taupe, celadon and navy.
One of many hand-shake photos in front of the fireplace. President George W. Bush sitting to the viewer's right, the guest (Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda) to the left, March 2003. One of the rare images where there is fire in the fireplace.
A panoramic view of the Oval Office, January 26, 2017. President Donald Trump is seated at the Resolute desk.

Formal working space of the President of the United States.

- Oval Office
President Joe Biden on the night of his inauguration, Wednesday, January 20, 2021

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Image of the Rose Garden prior to the 2020 renovations. The West Colonnade, designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe and Thomas Jefferson, can be seen in the background.

White House Rose Garden

Image of the Rose Garden prior to the 2020 renovations. The West Colonnade, designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe and Thomas Jefferson, can be seen in the background.
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The Rose Garden arranged for a state dinner at night in 2019

The White House Rose Garden is a garden bordering the Oval Office and the West Wing of the White House in Washington, D.C., United States.

President Barack Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump sit in the Oval Office with the Resolute desk, the desk they both used, in the background.

List of Oval Office desks

President Barack Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump sit in the Oval Office with the Resolute desk, the desk they both used, in the background.
The Theodore Roosevelt desk in William Howard Taft's new Oval Office in 1909
Stanley Tretick's October 2, 1963 photo of John F. Kennedy Jr. playing in the kneehole of the Resolute desk
President Richard Nixon at the Wilson desk giving a televised address explaining release of edited transcripts of the Watergate tapes on April 29, 1974

Since the construction of the Oval Office in 1909, there have been six different desks used in the office by the president of the United States.

The newly built Oval Office in 1934.

Eric Gugler

American Neoclassical architect, interior designer, sculptor and muralist.

American Neoclassical architect, interior designer, sculptor and muralist.

The newly built Oval Office in 1934.
Forum Auditorium ceiling mural (1931), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
West Wing under construction, 1934.
Location of the Oval Office in the West Wing.
Plaza, Theodore Roosevelt Memorial (1967), Washington, D.C.
Fountain, Theodore Roosevelt Memorial (1967), Washington, D.C.
Waldo Hutchins Memorial Bench (1932), Central Park, New York City
Georgia Hall (1933), Warm Springs, Georgia, with architect Henry J. Toombs
Gugler's 1934 design for the Oval Office floor was finally executed in 2005.
White House Steinway Piano (1938)
"Chip Chop" (1945), Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts
Harvey S. Firestone Memorial (1950), Akron, Ohio.
FDR Memorial Block (1965), National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.

He was selected by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to design the Oval Office.

The Avenue in the Rain, 1917

The Avenue in the Rain

1917 oil painting by the American Impressionist painter Childe Hassam.

1917 oil painting by the American Impressionist painter Childe Hassam.

The Avenue in the Rain, 1917
Barack Obama working at the Resolute desk in the Oval Office in 2009, with the painting to his right
The Fourth of July, 1916
Flags on Waldorf, 1916
Avenue of the Allies, 1917
Flags, Fifth Avenue, 1918
Allies Day, 1918
Rue Montorgueil à Paris. Fête du 30 juin 1878
Rue Saint-Denis, fête du 30 juin 1878

It was in the President's Dining Room for many years and hung in the Oval Office during Bill Clinton's, Barack Obama's, and Donald Trump’s terms, as well as currently under Joe Biden's term.

The State Dining Room in 1904. Davenport & Co. made the twin dining tables, 50 side chairs, 6 armchairs and 3 serving tables for the room. Many of the side chairs, now upholstered in ivory, are still in use.

A. H. Davenport and Company

Late 19th-century, early 20th-century American furniture manufacturer, cabinetmaker, and interior decoration firm.

Late 19th-century, early 20th-century American furniture manufacturer, cabinetmaker, and interior decoration firm.

The State Dining Room in 1904. Davenport & Co. made the twin dining tables, 50 side chairs, 6 armchairs and 3 serving tables for the room. Many of the side chairs, now upholstered in ivory, are still in use.
Davenport & Co. executed the interiors for H. H. Richardson's Thomas Crane Public Library (1881), in Quincy, Massachusetts.
President Theodore Roosevelt seated in a State Dining Room armchair, on the South Porch of the White House, 1903.
Theodore Roosevelt desk in the Executive Office, 1904.
Interior of Winn Memorial Library (1879), Woburn, Massachusetts.
Interior of Billings Library (1883), Burlington, Vermont.
Throne Room of the Iolani Palace, c. 1887.
New York Court of Appeals Room in 2009.
Fireplace, New York Court of Appeals Room, before its 1916 relocation.
Pedestal desk (c. 1884), from New York Court of Appeals Room.
Converse Memorial Library (1885), Malden, Massachusetts.
Warder Mansion dining room, c. 1890. Francis H. Bacon designed the Colonial-Revival furniture.
Three sofas (c. 1899), Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, Hyde Park, New York.
Reading Room, Massachusetts State House Annex, c. 1908.
Interior of George Eastman House (1905), Rochester, New York.
North wall of the State Dining Room, c. 1903.
The Green Room in 1904.
The Family Dining Room in 1907.
Theodore Roosevelt desk in the Taft Oval Office, 1909.
Wallpaper sold by Davenport & Co.
"Davenport" sofa.
The cane-back armchairs in the Oval Office were made by Davenport & Co. in 1902.

President William Howard Taft moved the desk, sofas and chairs into the first Oval Office, which was completed in 1909.

The Tidal Basin Inlet Bridge with inlet gates (in white), one of Wyeth's earliest important commissions

Nathan C. Wyeth

American architect.

American architect.

The Tidal Basin Inlet Bridge with inlet gates (in white), one of Wyeth's earliest important commissions
The Russell Senate Office Building, which Wyeth co-designed in 1903 and to which he designed the 1933 addition.
The F.A. Keep/C.R. Peyton House (now the Embassy of Kenya), designed by Wyeth in 1906 and 1908.
The West Wing of the White House, which Wyeth designed in 1909. The round walls of the Oval Office protrude from the structure.
The USS Maine Mast Memorial, designed by Wyeth in 1913.
The D.C. Armory, designed by Wyeth and completed in 1941.
Embassy of Zambia at 2419 Massachusetts Avenue NW, designed by Wyeth in 1907.
The Russian ambassador's residence at 1125 16th Street NW, designed by Wyeth in 1910.

He is best known for designing the West Wing of the White House, creating the first Oval Office.

CIA reference photograph of a Soviet medium-range ballistic missile in Red Square, Moscow

Cuban Missile Crisis

35-day (16 October – 20 November 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union, which escalated into an international crisis when American deployments of missiles in Italy and Turkey were matched by Soviet deployments of similar ballistic missiles in Cuba.

35-day (16 October – 20 November 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union, which escalated into an international crisis when American deployments of missiles in Italy and Turkey were matched by Soviet deployments of similar ballistic missiles in Cuba.

CIA reference photograph of a Soviet medium-range ballistic missile in Red Square, Moscow
Image of plans for the Bay of Pigs Invasion
More than 100 US-built missiles having the capability to strike Moscow with nuclear warheads were deployed in Italy and Turkey in 1961.
The relative ranges of the Il-28, SS-4, and SS-5 based on Cuba in nautical miles (NM).
Map created by American intelligence showing Surface-to-Air Missile activity in Cuba, September 5, 1962
A U-2 reconnaissance photograph of Cuba, showing Soviet nuclear missiles, their transports and tents for fueling and maintenance.
One of the first U-2 reconnaissance images of missile bases under construction shown to President Kennedy on the morning of October 16, 1962
President Kennedy meets in the Oval Office with General Curtis LeMay and the reconnaissance pilots who found the missile sites in Cuba.
As the article describes, both the US and the Soviet Union considered many possible outcomes of their actions and threats during the crisis (Allison, Graham T.; Zelikow, Philip D.). This game tree models how both actors would have considered their decisions. It is broken down into a simple form for basic understanding.
President Kennedy and Secretary of Defense McNamara in an EXCOMM meeting
President Kennedy meets with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko in the Oval Office (October 18, 1962)
A US Navy P-2H Neptune of VP-18 flying over a Soviet cargo ship with crated Il-28s on deck during the Cuban Crisis.
President Kennedy signs the Proclamation for Interdiction of the Delivery of Offensive Weapons to Cuba at the Oval Office on October 23, 1962.
Soviet First Secretary Khrushchev's October 24, 1962 letter to Kennedy stating that the blockade of Cuba "constitute[s] an act of aggression..."
Adlai Stevenson shows aerial photos of Cuban missiles to the United Nations, October 25, 1962.
A declassified map used by the US Navy's Atlantic Fleet showing the position of American and Soviet ships at the height of the crisis.
S-75 Dvina with V-750V 1D missile (NATO designation SA-2 Guideline) on a launcher. An installation similar to this one shot down Major Anderson's U-2 over Cuba.
A Lockheed U-2F, the high altitude reconnaissance type shot down over Cuba, being refueled by a Boeing KC-135Q. The aircraft in 1962 was painted overall gray and carried USAF military markings and national insignia.
The engine of the Lockheed U-2 shot down over Cuba on display at Museum of the Revolution in Havana.
October 29, 1962 EXCOMM meeting held in the White House Cabinet Room. President Kennedy, Robert McNamara and Dean Rusk.
A US Navy HSS-1 Seabat helicopter hovers over Soviet submarine B-59, forced to the surface by US Naval forces in the Caribbean near Cuba (October 28–29, 1962)
Removal of Missiles in Cuba November 11, 1962 – NARA – 193868
The nuclear-armed Jupiter intermediate-range ballistic missile. The US secretly agreed to withdraw the missiles from Italy and Turkey.

After the EXCOMM meeting, a smaller meeting continued in the Oval Office.

Challenger's solid rocket boosters run away uncontrollably from the vapor cloud left after the vehicle's breakup

Space Shuttle Challenger disaster

Fatal accident in the United States space program that occurred on January 28, 1986, when the broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the death of all seven crew members aboard; it was the first fatal accident involving an American spacecraft in flight.

Fatal accident in the United States space program that occurred on January 28, 1986, when the broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the death of all seven crew members aboard; it was the first fatal accident involving an American spacecraft in flight.

Challenger's solid rocket boosters run away uncontrollably from the vapor cloud left after the vehicle's breakup
Cross-sectional diagram of the original SRB field joint
STS-51-L crew: (back row) Onizuka, McAuliffe, Jarvis, Resnik; (front row) Smith, Scobee, McNair
Ice on the launch tower hours before Challenger launch
Gray smoke escaping from the right-side solid rocket booster
Plume on right SRB at T+58.788 seconds
Challenger is enveloped in flaming liquid propellant after rupture of the liquid oxygen tank
Jay Greene at his console after the breakup of Challenger
The forward section of the fuselage after breakup, indicated by the arrow
Right SRB debris showing the hole caused by the plume
President Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan (left) at the memorial service on January 31, 1986
Members of the Rogers Commission arrive at Kennedy Space Center
Fragment of Challengers fuselage on display at Kennedy Space Center

After a discussion with his aides, Reagan postponed the State of the Union, and instead addressed the nation about the disaster from the Oval Office.

Rembrandt Peale, Self-portrait
(1828; Detroit Institute of Arts)

Rembrandt Peale

American artist and museum keeper.

American artist and museum keeper.

Rembrandt Peale, Self-portrait
(1828; Detroit Institute of Arts)
Miniature of Rembrandt Peale in 1795, by his uncle, James Peale
The Roman Daughter (1811)
Rembrandt Peale, Rubens Peale with a Geranium (1801)
"The oldest living American artist", Detail of a photograph of Rembrandt Peale taken by Mathew B. Brady
Portrait of George Washington (1795–1823)
Ballou's Pictorial, Volume XIII, October 17, 1857
Portrait of Rosalba Peale (1820), Smithsonian American Art Museum
Portrait of Edward Shippen Burd of Philadelphia (ca. 1806–1808)
Working Sketch of the Mastodon (1801)
Thomas Jefferson (1800)
Samuel Fisher Bradford (1803–1808)
Albert Gallatin (1805)
Portrait of Margaret Irvine Miller (1805)
Portrait of William Short (1806)
Portrait of Henry Robinson (1806–1808)
Portrait of Rubens Peale (1807)
Alida Livingston Armstrong and Daughter (c. 1810)
Boy from the Taylor Family (1812)
William Henry Harrison (1814)
Portrait of Jacob Gerard Koch (ca. 1817)
Portrait of Jane Griffith Koch (ca. 1817)
General Samuel Smith (ca. 1817)
Charles Mathews (ca. 1822)
DeWitt Clinton (ca. 1823)
Washington Before Yorktown (1823)
Michelangelo and Emma Clara Peale (1826)
The Sisters (Eleanor and Rosalba Peale) (1826)
Portrait of Dr. David Hosack (1826)
Horace H. Hayden (1829)
Raja Rammohan Roy (1833)
John C. Calhoun (1834)
Caroline Louisa Pratt Bartlett (1836)
Girl at a Window (Rosalba Peale) (1846)
Niagara Falls (1849)
Portraits of Richard Colgate Dale Jr and Elizabeth Woodruff Dale (1857)

Peale went on to create over 70 detailed replicas, including one of Washington in full military uniform that currently hangs in the Oval Office.

HMS Resolute and HMS Intrepid winter quarters, at Melville Island, 1852-53. Drawn by George Frederick McDougall, sailing master on Resolute.

HMS Resolute (1850)

Mid-19th-century barque-rigged ship of the British Royal Navy, specially outfitted for Arctic exploration.

Mid-19th-century barque-rigged ship of the British Royal Navy, specially outfitted for Arctic exploration.

HMS Resolute and HMS Intrepid winter quarters, at Melville Island, 1852-53. Drawn by George Frederick McDougall, sailing master on Resolute.
Queen Victoria visits Resolute, 16 December 1856, after its rediscovery and return to the British by the Americans.
Presidential cat Socks sitting at the Resolute desk in 1994
The Grinnell desk on display at the New Bedford Whaling Museum

Timbers from the ship were later used to construct the Resolute desk which was presented to the President of the United States and is currently located in the White House Oval Office.