Oxford

Oxford, EnglandCity of OxfordOxford, UKOxford, OxfordshireOxford, United KingdomOxford UniversityUniversity of OxfordOxford (UK)Oxford CBOxon
Oxford is a university city in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 155,000.wikipedia
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Oxfordshire

County of OxfordOxfordshire, EnglandCounty of Oxfordshire
Oxford is a university city in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 155,000.
Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Oxonium, the Latin name for Oxford) is a county in South East England.

Reading, Berkshire

ReadingReading, EnglandReading, United Kingdom
It is 56 mi northwest of London, 64 mi from Birmingham and 24 mi from Reading by road. In 1844, the Great Western Railway linked Oxford with London via Didcot and Reading, and other rail routes soon followed.
Reading is 70 mi east of Bristol, 24 mi south of Oxford, 40 mi west of London, 14 mi north of Basingstoke, 12 mi south-west of Maidenhead and 15 mi east of Newbury as the crow flies.

Oxford Castle

Oxford PrisonHM Prison OxfordOxford
Following the conquest, the town was assigned to a governor, Robert D'Oyly, who ordered the construction of Oxford Castle to confirm Norman authority over the area.
Oxford Castle is a large, partly ruined Norman medieval castle on the western side of central Oxford in Oxfordshire, England.

Siege of Oxford (1142)

besiegedbesieged the castlesettle down for a long siege
The city was besieged during The Anarchy in 1142.
Fought between his nephew, Stephen of Blois, and his daughter, the Empress Matilda (or Maud), who had recently been expelled from her base in Westminster and chosen the City of Oxford as her new headquarters.

Beaumont Street

A plaque in Beaumont Street commemorates these events.
Beaumont Street is a street in the centre of Oxford, England.

Merton College, Oxford

Merton CollegeMertonSt Alban Hall
Oxford's earliest colleges were University College (1249), Balliol (1263) and Merton (1264).
By 1274, when Walter retired from royal service and made his final revisions to the college statutes, the community was consolidated at its present site in the south east corner of the city of Oxford, and a rapid programme of building commenced.

Beaumont Palace

Beaumont
Richard I of England (reigned 6 July 1189 – 6 April 1199) and John, King of England (reigned 6 April 1199 – 19 October 1216) the sons of Henry II of England, were both born at Beaumont Palace in Oxford, on 8 September 1157 and 24 December 1166 respectively.
Beaumont Palace, built outside the north gate of Oxford, was intended by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace).

St Scholastica Day riot

Battle of St. Scholastica DaySt. Scholastica Day riotSt. Scholastica riot
The relationship between "town and gown" has often been uneasy – as many as 93 students and townspeople were killed in the St Scholastica Day Riot of 1355.
The St Scholastica Day riot of 10 February 1355 took place in Oxford, England.

River Thames

ThamesThames Riverthe Thames
The Duke's Cut was completed by the Duke of Marlborough in 1789 to link the new canal with the River Thames; and, in 1796, the Oxford Canal company built its own link to the Thames, at Isis Lock.
It flows through Oxford (where it is called the Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames and Windsor.

Oxford Canal

OxfordOxford Canal WalkNorth Oxford Canal
In 1790, the Oxford Canal connected the city with Coventry.
The Oxford Canal is a 78 mi narrow canal in central England linking Oxford with Bedworth (between Coventry and Nuneaton on the Coventry Canal) via Banbury and Rugby.

Siege of Oxford

surrender of Oxfordbesiege Oxfordbesieging Oxford
The town yielded to Parliamentarian forces under General Fairfax in the Siege of Oxford of 1646.
The Siege of Oxford refers to the English Civil War military campaigns waged to besiege the Royalist controlled city of Oxford, involving three short engagements over twenty-five months, which ended with a Parliamentarian victory in June 1646.

Richard I of England

Richard IRichard the LionheartKing Richard I
Richard I of England (reigned 6 July 1189 – 6 April 1199) and John, King of England (reigned 6 April 1199 – 19 October 1216) the sons of Henry II of England, were both born at Beaumont Palace in Oxford, on 8 September 1157 and 24 December 1166 respectively.
Richard was born on 8 September 1157, probably at Beaumont Palace, in Oxford, England, son of King Henry II and Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine.

Didcot

Didcot, OxfordshireDidcot Station
In 1844, the Great Western Railway linked Oxford with London via Didcot and Reading, and other rail routes soon followed.
Didcot is 15 mi south of Oxford, 10 mi east of Wantage and 15 mi north west of Reading.

Headington

Headington, OxfordOld HeadingtonHeadington, Oxfordshire
In 1929 the boundaries of the city were extended to include the suburbs of Headington, Cowley and Iffley to the east, and Wolvercote to the north.
Headington is an eastern suburb of Oxford, England.

Grandpont

The boundaries were further extended in 1889 to add the areas of Grandpont and New Hinksey, south of the Thames, which were transferred from Berkshire to Oxfordshire.
Grandpont is a mainly residential area in south Oxford.

Wolvercote

Upper WolvercoteLower WolvercoteWolvercote cemetery
In 1929 the boundaries of the city were extended to include the suburbs of Headington, Cowley and Iffley to the east, and Wolvercote to the north.
Wolvercote is a village that is part of the City of Oxford, England.

River Cherwell

CherwellCherwell ValleyCherwell River
Local government in Oxford was reformed by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835, and the boundaries of the borough were extended to include a small area east of the River Cherwell.
It rises near Hellidon in Northamptonshire and flows south through Oxfordshire for 40 mi to meet the Thames at Oxford.

Oxford Martyrs

Protestant bishopsThe Oxford Martyrs
The Oxford Martyrs were tried for heresy in 1555 and subsequently burnt at the stake, on what is now Broad Street, for their religious beliefs and teachings.
The Oxford Martyrs were Protestants tried for heresy in 1555 and burnt at the stake in Oxford, England, for their religious beliefs and teachings, during the Marian persecution in England.

Oxford Town Hall

Town Hall
Oxford Town Hall was built by Henry T. Hare; the foundation stone was laid on 6 July 1893 and opened by the future King Edward VII on 12 May 1897.
Oxford Town Hall is a public building in St Aldate's Street in central Oxford, England.

New Hinksey

The boundaries were further extended in 1889 to add the areas of Grandpont and New Hinksey, south of the Thames, which were transferred from Berkshire to Oxfordshire.
New Hinksey is a suburb in the south of the city of Oxford.

Cambridge

Cambridge, EnglandCambridge, UKCambridge, United Kingdom
The sweating sickness epidemic in 1517 was particularly devastating to Oxford and Cambridge where it killed half of both cities' populations, including many students and dons.
In 1209, Cambridge University was founded by students escaping from hostile townspeople in Oxford.

Oxford Brookes University

Oxford PolytechnicOxford BrookesOxford Brooks University
Oxford's second university, Oxford Brookes University, formerly the Oxford School of Art, then Oxford Polytechnic, based at Headington Hill, was given its charter in 1991 and for ten years has been voted the best new university in the UK.
Oxford Brookes University is a public university in Oxford, England.

Iffley Road

Iffley Turn
On 6 May 1954, Roger Bannister, a 25-year-old medical student, ran the first authenticated sub-four-minute mile at the Iffley Road running track in Oxford.
Iffley Road is a major arterial road in Oxford, England.

Franciscans

FranciscanFranciscan OrderFriars Minor
A grandson of King John established Rewley Abbey for the Cistercian Order; and friars of various orders (Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites, Augustinians and Trinitarians) all had houses of varying importance at Oxford.
Beginning at Greyfriars at Canterbury, the ecclesiastical capital, they moved on to London, the political capital, and Oxford, the intellectual capital.

St John's College, Oxford

St John's CollegeSt. John's College, OxfordSt John
The skeletons of more than thirty suspected victims were unearthed in 2008 during the course of building work at St John's College.
The endowments which St John's was given at its foundation, and during the twenty or so years afterward, served it very well and in the second half of the nineteenth century it benefited, as ground landlord, from the suburban development of the city of Oxford and was unusual among Colleges for the size and extent of its property within the city.