Oxford Dictionary of English

New Oxford Dictionary of EnglishODEOxford DictionariesOxford Dictionary of the English LanguageThe New Oxford Dictionary of EnglishThe Oxford Dictionary of English
The Oxford Dictionary of English (ODE) is a single-volume English dictionary published by Oxford University Press, first published in 1998 as The New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE).wikipedia
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New Oxford American Dictionary

The New Oxford American DictionaryEsquivalienceNOAD
The New Oxford American Dictionary is the American version of the Oxford Dictionary of English, with substantial editing and uses a diacritical respelling scheme rather than the IPA system.
NOAD is based upon the New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE), published in the United Kingdom in 1998, although with substantial editing, additional entries, and the inclusion of illustrations.

Concise Oxford English Dictionary

Concise Oxford DictionaryThe Concise Oxford DictionaryCOD
However, starting from the 10th edition, it is based on the Oxford Dictionary of English (also known as the NODE) rather than the OED.

Oxford Dictionaries

Oxford Dictionaries OnlineOxfordDictionaries.comAskOxford.com
Buyers of the third edition of the Oxford Dictionary of English, also published in 2010, were granted a one-year subscription to the website's subscription content.

Dictionary

dictionariesonline dictionaryList of English dictionaries
The Oxford Dictionary of English (ODE) is a single-volume English dictionary published by Oxford University Press, first published in 1998 as The New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE).

Oxford University Press

Clarendon PressOUPOxford
The Oxford Dictionary of English (ODE) is a single-volume English dictionary published by Oxford University Press, first published in 1998 as The New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE).

Oxford English Dictionary

OEDOxford DictionaryThe Oxford English Dictionary
This dictionary is not based on the Oxford English Dictionary and should not be mistaken for a new or updated version of the OED.

Vuvuzela

vuvuzelashornsplastic hooters
The Third Edition was published in August 2010, with some new words, including "vuvuzela".

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
The first editor, Judy Pearsall, wrote in the introduction that it is based on a modern understanding of language and is derived from a corpus of contemporary English usage.

Corpus linguistics

corpuscorporacorpus analysis
The first editor, Judy Pearsall, wrote in the introduction that it is based on a modern understanding of language and is derived from a corpus of contemporary English usage.

Split infinitive

splitLayamon examplesplit infinitives
For example, the editors did not discourage split infinitives, but instead justified their use in some contexts.

British National Corpus

BNC
The first edition was based on bodies of texts such as the British National Corpus and the citation database of the Oxford Reading Programme.

Database

database management systemdatabasesDBMS
The first edition was based on bodies of texts such as the British National Corpus and the citation database of the Oxford Reading Programme.

Caribbean

the CaribbeanWest IndiesWest Indian
A network of consultants provide extensive coverage of English usage from the United States to the Caribbean and New Zealand.

International Phonetic Alphabet

IPAPronunciationInternational Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is used to present pronunciations, which are based on Received Pronunciation.

Received Pronunciation

RPQueen's EnglishBBC English
The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is used to present pronunciations, which are based on Received Pronunciation.

Oxford English Corpus

The Second Edition added over 3,000 new words, senses and phrases drawn from the Oxford English Corpus.

Pronunciation respelling for English

English Phonetic Alphabetdiacritical respelling scheme(/deɪ/)
The New Oxford American Dictionary is the American version of the Oxford Dictionary of English, with substantial editing and uses a diacritical respelling scheme rather than the IPA system.

Cat café

cat cafecat cafesCaturday Café
Cat café has been officially recognized in the online edition of the Oxford Dictionary of English since August 2015.

Dumbshow

dumb showdumb shows
Dumbshow, also dumb show or dumb-show, is defined by the Oxford Dictionary of English as "gestures used to convey a meaning or message without speech; mime."

Lord

lordshipseigneurseigneurs
According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word can be traced back to the Old English word hlāford which originated from hlāfweard meaning "loaf-ward" or "bread keeper", reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a chieftain providing food for his followers.